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Full text of "Annual Report of the Commissioner of the General Land Office to the Secretary of the Interior for the Fiscal Year ended June 30, 1904"

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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMISSIONER OF THE GENERAL 
LAND OFFICE 



TO THE 



SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR 



FOR 



THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1904. 



& it 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 
1904. 



e? 




REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONER OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE, 



Department of the Interior, 

General Land Office, 
Washington, D. C, Octobers, 190 % 

Sir: In submitting the annual report of this Office for the fiscal year 
♦ended June 30, 1904, I have to state that the business of the Office 
shows a small decrease from the year 1903, the total receipts being 
$9,283,341.98, a decrease of $1,711,101.67 from the preceding year, 
and the total area disposed of being 16,105,821.95 acres, a decrease of 
6,118,177.70 acres. With the exception of the year 1903, the cash 
receipts are, however, greater than for any } T ear since the fiscal 
year 1889. 

There were 56,386 patents of all classes issued during the fiscal year, 
an increase of 2,021 over the preceding; but there were 89,133 cases 
pending in the Office on July 1, 1901, and I have, therefore, included 
in my annual estimates an item for ten additional clerks at $1,200 per 
annum. 

ADDITIONAL SPACE FOR CLERKS AND RECORDS. 

By letters of February 27 and March 11, 1901, the needs of this 
Office in the matter of additional space were called to the attention of 
the Department. When the General Land Office was removed, in 
March, 1900, to the public building in which it is now located, the 
space then assigned to it was barely sufficient for the accommodation 
of the records and the clerical force. Since then the force has been 
increased by 65 clerks, without any increase in the number of rooms, 
and a proper regard for the orderly and convenient working of the 
clerical force, and trie health of its individual members, requires that 
some provision be made for additional space in the building, or in some 
other suitable building conveniently situated. 

The great and regular increase of the past few years in the sales of 
public lands has caused a consequent increase in the records. A very 
large part of the old records and files is stored away in boxes and piled 
in the attic, and the remainder is stored in the lower hall and passage- 
way under the court, adjacent to steam pipes, which so affect them that 
the binding of the books become destroyed, and papers so baked as to 
become brittle and break when handled. Inquiries are frequently 
received for information regarding transactions relating back to the 
organization of the Office and the intervening period, and access to 

3 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



the records is extremely difficult, causing a waste of time on the part 
of the clerical force. These old records and files are as valuable as 
the current ones, and reference has to be made to them very often in 
order to trace back titles, and their condition is such as to require 
three or four times the period for the examination of a particular 
record or file, as would be necessary if systematically arranged. To 
accommodate the clerical force, with a view to its efficiency, and pro- 
vide for the systematic arrangement of its records and files in such 
manner as to render them easy of access for the next ten years, it is 
estimated that it will require 28 additional rooms 16 by 20 feet (height 
of ceiling not less than 12 feet), and 1 can not too strenuously urge 
that the additional space be provided. 

DISPOSAL OF PUBLIC LANDS. 

The following is a statement of the acreage disposed of during the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1901: 

CASH SALES. Acres. 

Private entries 22, 308. 12 

Public auction 68, 603. 78 

Preemption entries 9, 675. 25 

Timber and stone entries 1, 306, 261. 30 

Mineral-land entries 88, 182. 55 

Desert-land entries ( original ) 753, 731. 33 

Excesses on homestead and other entries 22, 009. 87 

Coal-land entries 28, 827. 42 

Town sites 138. 55 

Supplemental payments 1. 79 

Abandoned military reservations „ . 2, 330. 79 

Under sundry special acts 5, 273. 98 

Total 2, 307, 344. 73 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Acres. 

Homestead entries (original) 10, 171 , 265. 97 

Entries with — 

Military bounty land warrants 32, 164. 44 

Agricultural college scrip 960. 00 

Private land scrip 7, 880. 00 

Eed Lake and Pembina scrip 480. 00 

Valentine scrip 80. 00 

Sioux half-breed scrip 400. 00 

Dodge scrip 40. 00 

State selections 1, 042, 398. 39 

Railroad selections 2, 353, 584. 96 

Wagon-road selections 77, 709. 10 

Indian allotments 4, 610. 19 

Small holdings 447. 93 

Donation act 320. 00 

Swamp lands patented 259, 207. 23 

13, 951, 548. 21 

Total area of public-land entries and selections 16, 258, 892. 94 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



INDIAN LANDS. 

Acres. 

Cherokee school 579. 62 

Southern Ute 11, 286. 27 

Ute 38, 426. 2:5 

Osage trust and diminished reserve 10, 998. 36 

Chippewa 120. 00 

Red Lake Indian Reservation ceded lands 73, 524. 27 

Otoe and Missouria 40. 00 

Omaha 360. 30 

Absentee Shawnee Indian school land 319. 50 

Umatilla 1 . 759. 68 

Sioux 41. 44 

Uinta and White River Ute lands 720. 38 

Colville Indian reserve 8, 752. 96 

146,929.0] 

Grand total 16, 405, 821. 95 

RECAPITULATION. 

Area sold for cash 2, 307, 344. 73 

Area miscellaneous entries 13, 951, 548. 21 

Area Indian lands 146, 929. 01 

Aggregate 16, 405, 821. 95 

Showing a decrease of 6,418,477.70 acres as compared with the aggregate of 
disposals for the fiscal year 1903. , 

The foregoing statement does not include the following entries, the 
areas of which have been previously reported in the original entries 
of the respective classes: 

Acres. 

Final desert-land entries 268, 913. 43 

Homesteads commuted to cash 2, 1 42. L85. 44 

Timber-culture entries commuted under act March 3, 1891 320. 00 

Abandoned military reservations 18, 804. 81 

Cash substitutions 2, 721. 49 

Supplemental payments 1 78. 14 

Under sundry acts 11, 913. 32 

Final homesteads 3, 232, 716. 75 

Final timber-culture entries 70, 640. 05 

5,748,393.43 

Commuted homestead and final desert entries, Indian lands SS, 860. 22 

Total. 5,837,253.65 



b EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

The number of filings and fees thereon will be found in the follow- 
ing table: 

Preemption declaratory statements 

Homesteads, soldiers' declaratory statements 

Coal land, declaratory statements 2, 985 

Reservoir, declaratory statements 

Valentine scrip applications 

Mineral-land applications 

Timber and stone applications 

Town-site applications 

Mineral adverse claims 



Number. 


Fees. 


297 


$857. 00' 


. 1, 097 


2, 307. 00 


. 2, 985 


8, 764. 00 


. 1,303 


2, 691. 00 


3 


3.00 


1,773 


17, 730. 00 


. 9, 582 


95, 820. 00 


2 


6.00 


17, 042 


128, 178. 00 


229 


2, 290. 00 



Total 17, 271 130, 468. 00 

Miscellaneous fees: 

For reducing testimony to writing, etc Ill, 660. 85 

For cancellation fees 4, 993. 00 



Aggregate of fees 247, 121. 85 

CASH RECEIPTS. 

The following' is a statement of the cash receipts of the Office from 
various sources during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904: 

Sales of land at private entry $28, 293. 84 

Sales of land at public auction 103, 198. 20 

Sales of land by preemption entry 12, 480. 96 

Sales of timber and stone land .. 3, 266, 142. 96 

Sales of mineral land 354, 064. 86 

Sales of desert land (original) 188, 405. 49 

For final desert land 268, 922. 12 

For commuted homesteads 2, 747, 659. 61 

For timber-culture entries commuted under act of March 3, 1891 . 

For excesses on homestead, timber-culture, and other entries 

For sales of coal lands 

For sales of town sites 

For sales of town lots 

Interest payments on commuted homesteads 

For competitive bids - 

For supplemental payments 

Cash substitutions 

Sales of abandoned military reservations 

Sales under sundry special acts 

Total 7,445,902.84 

FEES AND COMMISSIONS. 

For homestead entries (original and final) $1, 050, 551. 16 

For timber-culture entries (final) 1, 820. 00 

For entries with — 

Military bounty land warrants 805. 50 

Agricultural college scrip 24. 00 

Valentine scrip 2. 00 

Dodge scrip 1.00 



400. 00 


31,172.28 


395, 209. 90 


323. 20 


120.00 


8, 535. 71 


329. 25 


34. 18 


3, 263. 03 


26,726.82 


10, 620. 43 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



For State selections 

For railroad selections 

For wagon-road selections 

For lands entered under donation act 

For commissions on commuted homesteads (Indian 

ceded lands) 

For preemption, coal, reservoir, and other filings 

For mineral adverse claims 

For cancellation notices 

For reducing testimony to writing, etc 



812, 322. 00 

29, 542. 00 

976. 00 

10.00 

6, 815. 38 

128,178.00 

2, 290. 00 

4, 993. 00 

111, 660. 85 



-$1,349,990.89 

Total receipts from disposal of public lands 8, 795, 893. 73 

Total receipts from disposal of Indian lands 333, 757. 62 

Total receipts from depredations on public lands 72, 585. 08 

Total receipts from sales of timber under acts March 3, 1891, and June 

4, 1897 • 56, 691. 70 

Total receipts from sales of Government property (office furniture, etc. ) . 738. 85 

Total receipts from furnishing copies of records and plats 23, 675. 00 



Grand total 9, 283, 341. 98 

The total cash receipts for the fiscal year 1903 were $11,024,743.65, 
showing- a decrease in receipts for the year ended June 30, 1904, of 
$1,741,401.67. 

The total expenses of district land offices for salaries and commis- 
sions of registers and receivers, incidental expenses, and expenses of 
depositing public moneys during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904, 
were $842,975.51, an increase of $14,112.89. 

The aggregate expenditures and estimated liabilities of the public 
land service, including expenses of district land offices as stated, were 
$2,100,093.92, leaving a net surplus in the United States Treasury of 
$7,183,248.06. 

Statement showing a mounts covered into Treasury to the credit of the reclamation fund from 
sales of public lands, up to and including the fiscal year 1903, and an estimate of the 
same in the various States and Territories for fiscal year ended June SO, 1904. 

[See act June 17, 1902, 32 Stat., 388.] 



State or Territory. 


Total for three 
years ended 
June 30, 1903. 


Estimate for 
1904. 


Total for four 
years ended 
June 30. 1904. 


Arizona 


1130, 133. 71 
1,342,492.16 
1, 178, 807. 90 
1,157,780.58 
76, 972. 22 
1,330,449.29 

373, 926. 88 
37, 550. 84 

301,503.15 
2,472,412.78 
1,873,562.20 
2,807,931.74 

556,258.51 

235,696.76 
1,903,388.31 

665, 472. .01 


$36,270.15 
629,416.05 
412,359.66 

187, 748. 97 

20, 877. 36 
418,653.61 
104, 046. 54 

10, 602. ;>: 
118,699.11 
933, 687. 36 
678,575.18 
1, 122,728.01 
186,522.09 

66,654.27 
831,97 4.67 
209,781.87 


$166, 103.86 


California 


1.971. '.HIS. 'J 1 




1,591,167.56 


Idaho : 


1,645,529.65 


Kansas 


97,849.58 


Montana 


1,749,002.90 




477,973.42 


Nevada 


48, 153.4] 


New Mexico 


420, 202. 26 


North Dakota 


3,406,100.14 


Oklahoma 


2,552,137.33 




4,230,659.75 


South Dakota. .. 


742,780.60 


Utah 


302,351.03 


Washington 


2,735,362.98 




875. 2 






Total . 


16,444,339.04 


(i, 568, 497. 42 


23, 012,830. 46 







O REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

PATENTS ISSUED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1904. 

There were 56,386 patents of all classes issued during the year. Of 
this number 52,102 are classed as agricultural, 1,247 Indian allot- 
ments, 2,501 mineral land, 174 coal land, 95 private land claim, 210 
railroad, and 54 swamp land patents. This is an increase of 1,118 
agricultural patents over patents of the same character during the 
preceding year. 

Railroad and wagon-road patents. — During the year there were 
certified and patented under the several land grants for the construc- 
tion of railroads and wagon roads 4,551,071.66 acres, a decrease of 
1,265,885.38 acres from the preceding year. 

Swamp-land patents. — There were 259,207.23 acres of ordinary 
swamp lands patented to the various States during the year, a decrease 
of 2,650,540.65 acres, which decrease is accounted for by the fact that 
during the preceding year one patent was issued covering 2,862,280 
acres of lands situated in the Everglades and Mangrove Swamp in 
Florida. 

Military bounty land warrants. — There have been, approximately, 
30,960 acres of public lands located with military bounty land warrants 
during the year. 

DISPOSALS OF PUBLIC AND CEDED INDIAN LANDS. 

The records of the Public Lands Division show continued activity 
in the disposal of public and ceded Indian lands. 

On June 30, 1903, 255,724 original entries were pending in this 
division, and 98,948 entries were received during the year. Of these 
25,171 were canceled during the year, 47,786 were passed to final 
entry, and 8,789 were referred to other divisions, leaving a balance 
pending June 30, 1904, of 272,926. 

On June 30, 1903, there were 39,310 final entries pending in the 
Public Lands Division, and 67,386 final entries were received during 
the } T ear, making a total of 106,696. Of this number 167 were dis- 
posed of by cancellation during the year, 10,485 were referred to 
other divisions, and 58,420 were approved for patenting, leaving a 
balance pending on June 30, 1904, of 37,624, a decrease of 2,286 in 
the number of final entries pending at the beginning of the fiscal year. 

The number of final entries approved for patenting the past year was 
18,645 more than the preceding } T ear, and was larger than in any pre- 
vious year in the history of the division. There were also 49,161 
letters and decisions written in this division the past year, being more 
than in any other }^ear since its organization. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 9 

AGRICULTURAL LANDS IN INDIAN RESERVATIONS. 

Instructions and schedules of land were issued the past year for the 
sale and disposal of agricultural lands in the following ceded Indian 
reservations, viz: 

A.cres. 

Chippewa Reservations, Minnesota 1, 017, 618. 12 

Red Lake Reservation, Minnesota 256, 143. 58 

Rosebud Reservation, South Dakota 385, 887. 11 

Devils Lake Reservation, North Dakota 88, 948. 39 

Grande Ronde Reservation, Oregon 26, 264. 65 

Total ] , 774, 861. 85 

LEGISLATION IN REGARD TO ARID LANDS. 

On April 28, 1904 (see 33 U. S. Stat., 547), the act known as the 
Kinkaid Act became a law. This legislation is experimental, and is 
intended to solve the problem as to the disposition of lands not sus- 
ceptible of irrigation. The law provides, in brief, that homestead 
entries in the State of Nebraska, west and north of certain designated 
lines, shall not exceed in area 640 acres, and must be in as nearly com- 
pact form as possible, and in no event exceed 2 miles in extreme 
length, and provision is made for additional entries of contiguous 
land by persons who own and occupy lands previously entered by 
them. The law also provides for the exclusion from the effect of the 
act of such lands as, in the opinion of the Secretary of the Interior, it 
may be reasonably practicable to irrigate under the national irrigation 
law or by private enterprise. 

Instructions have already been issued under the Kinkaid Act for the 
disposal of 8,000,000 acres of land in Nebraska, and there have been 
withdrawn under said law 1,000,000 acres determined to be practically 
susceptible of irrigation. 

RECLAMATION OF ARID LANDS. 

Instructions were issued June 3, 1904, in regard to the Minidoka 
reclamation project in Idaho, under the act of June 17, 1902 (32 IT. S. 
Stat., 388). This project comprises land in thirteen different town- 
ships, viz: Townships 9, 10, and 11 south, of ranges 22 and 23 east; 
townships 8, 9, 10, and 11 south, of range 24 east; and townships s. :♦. 
and 10 south, of range 25 east, estimated to contain from 125,000 to 
150,000 acres. The "farm units 11 or limits of area allowed per entry 
in said project varies from 40 to 80 acres (except in fractional sub- 
divisions, which are more or less), lands situated within a radius <>!' 
li miles from the center of a town site, being divided into 40-acre 
units. The charge for the lands in this project will probably he from 
$25 to $35 per acre. 



10 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Instructions are also in course of preparation for the Truckee-Carson 
project in the State of Nevada. The lands included therein are in 
townships 18 and 19 north, ranges 28 and 29 east, Mount Diablo 
meridian, and embrace 21,580.89 acres. There are 239 "farm units" 
therein, varying in size from 40 to 160 acres. The price of lands in 
this project has been fixed at $26 per acre, payable in ten annual 
installments. 

The following statement obtained informally from the Geological 
Survey, shows, by States, the amount of land withdrawn under said 
act of June 17, 1902, up to June 15, 1901, the acreage thereof restored, 
and the lands remaining withdrawn after such restoration, viz: 



State or Territory. 


Withdrawn. 


Restored. 


Remaining 
with- 
drawn. 




Acres. 
3, 325, 000 
1,968,300 
2, 399, 000 
3, 694, 760 


Acres. 


Acres. 
3, 325, 000 
1, 968, 300 
904, 000 








1,495,000 




3, 694, 760 










9, 013, 600 
2, 599, 000 
4, 103, 040 
995, 000 
1,013,720 


1,035,000 

46, 000 

202, 920 

161,000 


7, 978, 600 


Nebraska 


2, 553, 000 


Nevada 


3, 900, 120 




834, 000 




1,013,720 








Oregon 


1,504,600 
1,680,290 
92, 000 
4,278,530 
3, 289, 200 


91,520 


1,413,080 


South Dakota 


1,680,290 


Utah 




92,000 


Washington 

Wyoming 


69, 000 
944, 690 


4, 209, 530 
2, 344, 510 






Total 


39,956,040 


4,045,130 


35, 910, 910 







EXAMINATION OF CEDED CHIPPEWA LANDS IN MINNESOTA. 

The work of examining the lands in the former Chippewa Indian 
reservations, ceded under the act of January 11, 1889 (25 Stat., 612), 
was brought to a completion March 31 last. There were examined 
during the past year 725,818.98 acres, embracing lands in the Pigeon 
River, Fond du Lac, Bois Fort, Deer Creek, Red Lake and Chippewa 
of the Mississippi reservations. Of the total lands examined 88,320 
acres were classified as "pine" lands, and the estimates indicated that 
there are 172,415,000 feet of merchantable pine timber thereon. 

All the lands in the different ceded Chippewa reservations classed 
by the examiners as "agricultural" have been opened to settlement 
and entry, except 20 townships in the Red Lake Reservation, the sur- 
veys of which have not yet been accepted, and except lands in the 
Fond du Lac and Leech Lake reservations, which, under section 5 of 
the act of June 27, 1902 (32 Stat., 100), can not be opened until the 
allotments to the Indians therein have been completed. 

The timber on all the lands classed as "pine" has been sold or 
advertised for sale, except the timber on lands reserved for the pur 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 11 

pose of allowing the Forester of the Department of Agriculture to 
complete the selection for forestry purposes under said act of June 27, 
1902. This selection on his part will be necessarily delayed pending 
the completion of allotments to the Indians and also until the flowage 
lines, caused by the construction of dams at the headwaters of the 
Mississippi River, have been definitelj T determined. 

SALES OF CHIPPEWA PINE TIMBER. 

There were two sales of pine timber on ceded Chippewa lands held 
at Cass Lake, Minn., in December last, 415.000,000 feet of timber 
being sold for $2,650,903, or an average of $6.38 per 1,000 feet. 
Twent} 7 per cent of the amount of the sales has already been paid. 

Instructions and schedules have also been issued for the sale at Cass 
Lake, Minn., on November 15 next, of the pine timber on 116,190.26 
acres of " pine" lands, estimated to contain 210,77-1,000 feet of timber, 
and for the sale at the same place on November 17, 1904, of 95 per 
cent of the pine timber on 16,833.96 acres, estimated to contain 
12,967,000 feet of timber. 

LOGGING OPERATIONS ON CEDED CHIPPEWA LANDS. 

During the past logging season, there were cut from ceded Chip- 
pewa lands 45,590,448 feet of timber, the price paid being $269,198.13, 
or an average of $5.90 per 1,000 feet. The expense to the Indians of 
logging said timber was $14,421.82, or a little over 5 per cent. 

Logging operations have, except as to about 1,400,000 feet still 
standing, been completed on the "pine" lands on fifteen of the school 
sections in the Red Lake and White Earth reservations, embracing 
6,912.33 acres, the timber on which was sold at Crookston, Minn., on 
March 2, 1903. On these sections the scalers' reports show that there 
were 16,495,587 feet of timber cut. These sections, except as to one 
section examined in 1899, in which case the estimates and amount cut 
are about equal, were examined in the years 1893, 1894, and 1895 by 
Government estimators, who reported that there were only 10,151,000 
feet thereon, or about 56 per cent of the amount of timber actually on 
the land. 

Nine sections in the Chippewa of the Mississippi reservations, involv- 
ing 2,440.49 acres, the timber on which was sold at Cass Lake. Minn.. 
on December 5 last, were cut clean the past season, there being 
4,789,115 feet cut, as against 4,241,000 feet estimated to be thereon 
by Government estimators. 

For the timber on the twenty-four sections cut clean, except as to 
1,400,000 feet as above stated and involving 9,352. 82 acres, the price 
paid was $109,847.61, or an average of $11.74 per acre. 



12 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

• 
THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT SHOWS THE RESULT OF THE OPENING OF 
INDIAN RESERVATION LANDS AUTHORIZED BY ACTS OF CONGRESS 
PASSED DURING THE LAST SESSION OF CONGRESS, UPON THE RED 
LAKE RESERVATION, MINN., THE GRANDE RONDE RESERVATION, 
OREG., THE ROSEBUD RESERVATION, S. DAK., AND THE DEVILS LAKE 
RESERVATION, N. DAK. 

As provided by the act of February 20, 1904 (33 Stat.. 16), the Red 
Lake Indian lands of Minnesota were offered at public sale at Thief 
River Falls, Minn., commencing at 9 o'clock a. m., June 20, 1901, and 
said sale was continued until July 14, 1901, at which time the same 
was adjourned to be resumed at Crookston, Minn., October 3, 1904. 

There were sold 610 tracts, aggregating in area 93,747.59 acres, 
amounting to $589,117.20, or an average price of |6.28 per acre. 

The amount received at this sale was #117,823.44, being 20 per cent 
of the total value of the land sold. 

At the continuation of the public sale of Red Lake lands at Crooks- 
ton, Minn., October 3 to 8, 1904, 1,035 tracts, containing 162,197.29 
acres, were offered. 

There were sold 129 tracts, containing 20,388 acres, for $90,559.65. 
The purchasers paid one-hfth of the purchase price, amounting to 
118,111.93. 

The highest bid received was $9.70 per acre; the lowest $4 per acre, 
and the average price was $4.44. 

The total acreage in this reservation offered at public sale was 255,- 
945. 16 acres, of which amount 114, 135. 87 acres were sold for $679, 676. 85, 
one-fifth of the purchase price, namely, $135,935.37, being paid by 
the purchasers. 

There remain unsold 141,809.29 acres. 

Sealed bids for the sale of a part of the Grande Ronde Indian Res- 
ervation lands in Oregon, as provided by the act of April 28, 1904 (33 
Stat., 567), were received at Oregon City", Ore., land office, from 9 
o'clock a. m. on Monday, August 1, 1904, until 11 o'clock on Monday, 
August 8, 1904. 

The total area of this reservation offered for sale was 26,021.54 
acres, divided into 181 tracts of approximately 160 acres each. 

Three hundred and thirty- three bids were received for 111 different 
tracts, aggregating in area 16,418.48 acres, and ranging in price from 
$1.25 to $11.75 per acre, or an average price of $4.05 per acre, amount- 
ing to $66,497.21. Checks and money orders for $13,215.44 were 
received, representing practically 7 20 per cent of the amount bid, and 
the recommendation of the acceptance of these bids has been approved 
by the Secretary of the Interior. 

There are 9,603.06 acres for which there were no bids. The act 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 13 

provided that no bids should be accepted until the sum of all bids 
received should equal or exceed $28,500, and as $66,497.21 were received 
for less than two-thirds of the lands offered for sale, the sale is consid- 
ered highty satisfactory. 

The unallotted and unreserved lands of the Rosebud Indian Reser- 
vation, S. Dak., aggregating in area 385,817.11 acres, divided into 
2,412 claims of approximately 160 acres each, subject to disposal under 
the provisions of the act of April 23, 1901 (33 Stat., 251), were opened 
to homestead entry by registered applicants only during the first 
sixty days, and thereafter by the first legal applicant, in the order 
established by the drawing of July 28, 1904, at Bonesteel, *S. Dak., 
August 8, 1904, and such opening continued for lands in that district 
until and including September 10, 1904, and thereafter at Chamber- 
lain, S. Dak. 

The law fixes the price of these lands at $4 per acre, to be paid in 
installments and provides for reduction to $3 and $2.50 per acre after 
periods of three and six months, respectively, after opening and for 
disposal, for cash, under rules and regulations and slightly different 
conditions after expiration of four years after opening. 

One hundred and six thousand three hundred and eight persons 
registered as applicants for said lands. 

During the month of August, 1904, 938 homestead entries were 
made for these lands, aggregating in area 147,838.68 acres, upon which 
the first payment required under the act of April 23, 1904, supra, of $1 
per acre, was made, aggregating $147,838.68. 

Thirteen applications, under the President's proclamation of May 13, 
1904, were received for the reservation from homestead entry for as 
many town sites in the ceded Rosebud Indian lands, South Dakota. 
After a careful investigation of the same and an examination of the 
tracts applied for in the field, the applications were, on July 28, 11*04, 
submitted to the Secretary of the Interior, and the reservation of four 
town sites, covering 1,079.24 acres, was recommended, and on August 
2, 1904, the recommendation was approved by the Acting Secretary 
of the Interior and the other applications were rejected. 

The unallotted and unreserved lands of the Devils Lake Indian Res- 
ervation, aggregating in area 88,948.39 acres, divided into 556 claims, 
of approximately 160 acres each, to be disposed of under the provisions 
of the act of April 27, 1904 (33 Stat., 319), were opened to homestead 
entry by registered applicants only during the first sixty days, and there- 
after by the first legal applicant, at the Devils Lake office. North 
Dakota, on Tuesday, September 6, 1904, at 9 o'clock a. m.. and in the 
order established by the drawing of August 24, 1904, as prescribed by 
proclamation of June 2, 1904. Fifteen thousand and eighty-six per- 
sons registered as applicants for these lands. 

These lands are to be paid for at the rate of *4..'>n per acre, as fol- 



14 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



lows: $1.50 when the entry is made, and the remainder in annual 
installments of 50 cents per acre. 

The monthly report for September, which would include entries 
under this act, has not yet been received. 

Public Surveys. 

The areas covered by the surveys accepted by this Office during- the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1904, are as follows: 



State or Territory. 


Acres. 

1 
430, 186 
211,524 
108, 590 
505, 166 
274,683 
2, 330, 007 
68, 159 
351, 148 


State or Territory. 


Acres. 




; North Dakota 


529, 805 






359, 809 






1, 159, 134 




Utah 


305, 043 




Washington 


332, 454 




Wyoming 


429, 141 




Total 






7, 394, 850 




1 







By the act of Congress approved March 3, 1903 (32 Stat., 1116), 
making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government 
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904, and for other purposes, there 
was appropriated "For surveys and resurveys of public lands" the 
sum of $400,000, of which amount the Commissioner of the General 
Land Office was authorized to expend so much as he might deem 
necessary for examinations in the field, etc. 

Out of said appropriation the sum of $80,000 was set apart to cover 
the cost of examinations in the field, the sum of $15,000 was reserved 
for emergencies, and the remainder, $3^5,000, was apportioned among 
the several surveying districts. 

The apportionments made to the several districts were as follows: 

North Dakota $15, 000 

Oregon 22, 000 

Utah 16, 000 

Washington 32, 000 

Wyoming 30, 000 

Examinations 80, 000 

Reserve 15, 000 



Alaska $50,000 

Arizona 14,000 

California 15, 000 

Colorado 6, 000 

Idaho 32, 000 

Minnesota 10, 000 

Montana 43, 000 

Nevada 10, 000 

New Mexico 10, 000 



Total 



400, 000 



Further apportionments were made from time to time to several sur- 
veying districts, and toward the end of the fiscal year contracts aggre- 
gating $50,000 were awarded from the uncontracted balance of the 
appropriation, for resurveys in Routt and Rio Blanco counties, Colo., 
authorized by the act of Congress approved April 28, 1904 (33 Stat., 
519). 

During the fiscal year surveying contracts were approved aggre- 
gating $444,789, payable from the regular appropriation for surveys 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 15 

and resurveys, deposits by individuals, deposits by railroad companies, 
railroad repayments, the continuing appropriations per act of March 
2, 1895, for surveys within railroad limits, and from the appropriation 
for the survey of abandoned military reservations, and appropriations 
for Indian survej^s. 

TRANSACTIONS IN THE SEVERAL SURVEYING DISTRICTS. 



The surveyor-general reports thirteen contracts for the survey of 
public lands and mission claims awarded during- the year, the aggregate 
liability of which is 116,000. 

He recommends an examiner of surveys be assigned permanently 
to his district for the purpose of expediting action upon surveys. 

Application for mineral surveys were received, covering 169 loca- 
tions. Deposits for mineral surveys and office work thereon amounted 
to $5,980. There were 59 non-mineral surveys completed and 31 of 
the same forwarded to this Office. 



Of the annual appropriation $28,000 was apportioned to this dis- 
trict. This is nearly treble the amount set apart the previous year 
and indicates the increased demands for surveys owing to the rapid 
development of the Territory. During the year all the surveys in 
San Francisco Mountain Forest Reserve have been completed and plats 
filed, except in the case of one contract, the surve} 7 s under which were 
rejected. 

The mileage of surveys approved during the year aggregated 1,666 
miles and the total acreage of lands surveyed 462,000. 

In the mineral division of the Office there were orders issued for 
surveys of 460 claims. 

The surveyor-general recommends that authority be given to connect 
the various mineral monuments with each other. 

The record of office correspondence shows that 3,547 letters were 
written and sent out during the year. 

CALIFORNIA. 

The surveyor-general reports surveys of public lands contracted 
for amounting to $9,557.30, and mineral surveys for which special 
deposits have been made aggregating $10,260. Instructions for 156 
mining surveys were issued. The business of the office has increased, 
both in miscellaneous and departmental letters, over the previous 
year. 

Eight applications for public land surveys are now awaiting ticld 
inspection as to the bona fides of settlement. If these lands were 
embraced in awarded contracts the liability would reach over $6,000. 



16 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

The lands included in surveys approved during the year have an 
area of 176,889 acres. 

Work upon the Spanish archives has progressed favorably, espe- 
cially the indexing of manuscripts. Eighteen thousand and forty-one 
pages have been condensed into 622 closely written pages of English 
index. There were 158 visitors to these archives during the year. 

COLORADO. 

The surveyor-general reports 111,915 acres of agricultural land sur- 
veyed and accepted during the last fiscal year. The number of miles 
of line established is 159. 

Contracts for resurveys especially authorized by Congress in Routt 
and Rio Blanco counties were let, amounting to $50,000, just before 
the close of the fiscal year, and no returns were received. 

In the mineral division there were 593 official orders for surveys of 
claims. They included 1,311 lode and 55 placer claims. The surveyor- 
general approved 610 surveys during the year, of which 1,563 were 
lodes and 57 placers, making this the banner State for mineral business. 

Deposits for office work on the survey of mineral claims amounted 
to $39,560. 

Work on the diagrams segregating mineral from agricultural land 
has been proceeded with to the extent of constructing 78 original and 
86 amended diagrams, together with 161 of same made on small scale 
and transmitted to this Office. 



. No apportionment from the regular appropriation for surveys was 
made to Florida. One contract amounting to $500 was entered into, 
and two small " special instructions" surveys were issued for surve}^s 
of islands. Lists of swamp-land selections by the State of Florida 
have been recommended to this Office for approval. The State also 
filed a list of swamp lands aggregating 9,581 acres, which was recom- 
mended for rejection. Upon appeal the tracts were examined by a 
special agent and 1,606 acres reported as properly swamp lands. Seven 
applications for the survey of islands were received during the year. 



The surveyor-general in his report states that Idaho is settling up 
more rapidly than any other State, and asks that the standard parallels 
and meridian lines be extended over all the unsurveyed areas of the 
State in order to connect mineral monuments and facilitate subdi vis- 
ional work. 

Thirty -two thousand dollars was apportioned to Idado out of the 
regular appropriation, all of which was contracted for in eight con- 



KEPOET OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 17 

contracts. Two contracts for surveys of railroad lands were awarded, 
the liability of which was $1,926. 

He reports 90 orders issued for surveys of mineral claims involving 
314 locations. 

There were 73 mineral surveys approved involving 204 locations. 

LOUISIANA. 

There were no contracts for surveys let during the year in this 
district. 

The work of the surveyor-general's office is mainly directed to the 
issuance of certificates of location under the act of Congress approved 
June 2, 1858, and the preparation of patent plats under the act 
approved December 22, 1854, which work requires a large office force. 

The surveyor-general states in his report that he has issued certifi- 
cates of location in satisfaction of 10 confirmed private land claims 
aggregating 3,995 acres of land, making 85 certificates. He has 
during the year made and issued 130 patent plats with descriptive 
notes. As there remain 10,546 plats to be produced, he recommends 
an increase of appropriation for clerk hire. 

MINNESOTA. 

The surveyor-general, in his report for the fiscal year, states that 
there have been surveyed 7 full and 4 fractional townships of public 
lands, the field notes and plats of which have been prepared; 1 full 
and 2 fractional townships have been resurveyed, and plats and field 
notes made. Two full and 2 fractional townships of public land have 
been surveyed, but the office work is not completed. 

There were resurveyed 7 townships of Indian reservation lands, the 
office work on which has been completed. In all, 1,257 miles of line 
were run and marked in the field. The area of the tract surveyed is 
180,287 acres. 

The work of finishing up the surveys in Minnesota is being pushed 
forward as rapidly as the appropriation and the force in the surveyor- 
general's office will warrant. 

MONTANA. 

This district received the largest apportionment for 1904, amounting 
to $45,717, all of which was contracted for. In addition to this sum. 
special deposits from individuals and railroad companies were made 
and surveys authorized under the act of March 2, 1895, involving con- 
tracts, the total liability of which amounts to $79,558. There were 
6,000 miles of lines run and marked. 

In the mineral department great activity is reported, the deposits 
for mineral surveys showing an increase of 10 per cent over the pre- 
ceding year. 

8970—04 2 



18 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

During the fiscal year orders have been issued to the surve3^or- 
general to invite proposals for the survey and subdivision of the Flat- 
head and Crow Indian reservations, the cost of the survey being 
estimated at about $90,000. The office work required to prepare 
advertisements and notices, inspect and tabulate bids for the surveys 
above outlined, prepare contracts and special instructions, examine 
returns, prepare plats and field notes in triplicate for transmission to 
this office combine to make this office the largest and most active of all 
the surveying districts. 

NEVADA. 

This district has a large amount of unsurveyed land. The original 
apportionment of $10,000 for surveys was increased upon the request 
of the surveyor-general. 

There were also surveys authorized from repayments by the Central 
Pacific Railway Company and from the Indian appropriation, contracts 
for all of which reached the aggregate of $26,353. 

During the year 62 orders were issued for mineral surveys, embrac- 
ing 91 lodes and 9 placers. Eighty mineral surveys were approved, 
comprising 198 lodes and 1 placers. The amount deposited for office 
work on mineral surveys amounted to $3,200, as against $7,600 the 
previous year, showing a falling off in mineral business. 

NEW MEXICO. 

The apportionment last year to this district was increased to $10,000, 
owing to the great demand for surveys and contracts amounting to 
this sum having been awarded. 

Under the act of March 3, 1891, which provides for the survey of 
tracts not exceeding 160 acres, which tracts are denominated "small 
holding claims," there were awarded contracts for the survey of some 
1,600 of these claims. When they are situated in townships to be 
surveyed, it is necessary to connect them with public-land corners, 
and the platting of the small holdings on a larger scale involves an 
immense amount of office work, as in some instances it requires 30 
separate claim plats to a township. It is estimated that there are 
8,900 small holding tracts to be surveyed. 

The surveyor-general recommends an increase of apportionment to 
his district and an increase of compensation for surveys under the 
small holding claims act. 

All the private land claims confirmed by the United States Court of 
Private Land Claims have been surveyed and approved. Survey of 
several private land claims confirmed b}^ Congress are still pending. 
There were 131 mineral claims ordered surveyed during the year and 
$3,760 deposited on this account, and the mileage of surveys, the 
returns of which were transmitted to this office, amounted to 1,865 
miles. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 19 



NORTH DAKOTA. 



In this district there appears, according to the report of the sur- 
veyor-general, surveys executed in the field during the year of 2,467 
miles of line; about the same amount as in the previous year. The 
survey of the Fort Totten Military Reservation and of Devils Lake 
Indian Reservation in preparation for the opening was completed 
before the end of the fiscal year. 

The surveyor-general reports that there remains but a very small 
part of the public lands in North Dakota to be surveyed, and he 
recommends that these lands as well as the unsunned lands in the 
Standing Rock and Fort Berthold Indian reservations be surveyed, 
which will complete all the surveys in that State. 



In this State there is a temporary lull in the surveying work. The 
surveyor-general reports outstanding contracts the liability of which 
amounts to $28,325. 

Contracts awarded during the fiscal year amounted to but §2,925. 
The remainder of the apportionment of $22,000 was transferred to 
other districts when the demand for surveys was in excess of the sum 
allotted. 

The amount of public land embraced in contracts, the returns of 
which were examined and approved by the surve} T or-general during 
the last year, was 540,975 acres, with a mileage of 1,860 miles. 
^Orders for 55 mineral surveys were issued, embracing 152 lodes and 
1 placer. He also platted and approved 41 mineral surveys, comprising 
155 locations. The deposits by individuals for office work on mineral 
claims amounted to $4,590. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

No apportionment was made to this district for public land surveys. 
The surveying operations have been confined to work upon Indian 
reservations and mineral claims. 

The aggregate number of miles of surveys upon which office work 
was completed and returns forwarded to this office is 2,995. In addi- 
tion to this, work has been done upon returns not yet ready for trans- 
mission, amounting to 1,200 miles of surveys. Considerable time has 
been spent in the preparation of township diagrams on a large scale 
showing in a connected scheme all mining surveys. Deposits for 
office work upon mineral surveys aggregated $8,030. 

The surveyor-general advocates field examination of mining surveys. 

Indian surveys were contracted for, the liability of which was $4,500, 
and public land surveys amounting to $1,000. 



20 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

The mineral business of this office is extensive. During the year 
there were 83 orders issued for surveys of claims, embracing 368 lodes, 
and there were surveys approved, platted, and delivered embracing 
457 locations. 

• UTAH. 

The work of this surveying district has been unusually large this 
3^ear, owing to the preliminary surve} T s required for the opening of 
the Uintah Indian Reservation. 

The sum of $15,000 was apportioned to Utah for regular surveys. 
There were 3,748 miles of lines, embracing 1,082,000 acres of land, 
surveyed and approved by the surveyor-general. 

The Indian reservation surveys contracted for amounted to $94,000, 
and there were 18 contracts let for the work. At the close of the fis- 
cal year all the contractors were in the field, and many of them had 
completed their surveys. In order to expedite the work, three exam- 
iners of surveys were assig-ned to inspect it. 

The mineral department of the surveyor-general's office is one of the 
most active of all the districts, as is shown by the record of 632 orders 
for surveys of mineral claims and deposits for office work under the 
mineral laws, amounting to $15,795. 

The surveyor-general renews his recommendation for the examina- 
tion of mineral surveys and restoration of mineral monuments. 

WASHINGTON. 

The sum of $32,000 was set apart for surveys in this district. The 
surveyor-general reports the number of miles surveyed during the 
past fiscal year to be 2,269. The acreage of accepted surveys reached 
the total of 315,000 acres. 

Contracts for surveys awarded during the year, payable from the 
regular appropriation, amounted to $10,125; those payable from Indian 
appropriation, $4,995; railroad surveys, $14,365; in all, $29,465. 

Special deposits for office work on mining claims amounted to 
$4,070. For surveys of railroad lands $13,700 was deposited. There 
were 142 mineral claims surveyed. 

WYOMING. 

The surveyor-general states in his report that he has approved 
returns comprising the survey of 6 townships and resurvey of 13 
townships, covering in all 1,607 miles of line and 402,542 acres. His 
office has issued orders for the survey of 54 mineral claims, embracing 
290 lode locations and 6 places. He has approved 99 lode locations 
and 4 placers. For office work on mining claims there were deposits 
aggregating $6,775. 

In his office 61 agricultural plats and 178 mineral plats were pre- 
pared, showing a slight decrease of business during the year. 



KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 21 



EXAMINATIONS OF SURVEYS IN THE FIELD. 

By the act of Congress making appropriations for sundry civil 
expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ended Jane 30, 1904, 
approved March 3, 1903 (32 Stat., 1116), there was appropriated for 
surveys and resurveys of public lands the sum of $400,000. Of the 
amount appropriated the Commissioner of the General Land Office 
was authorized by said act to expend so much as he might deem neces- 
saiy for examinations of surveys in the field, in order to test the accu- 
racy of the work of deputy surveyors, and the examination of surveys 
heretofore made and reported to be defective or fraudulent. Acting 
under this authority, the Commissioner, with the sanction of the 
Department, set apart the sum of $80,000 for field examinations. 

There were employed during the year fourteen examiners of surveys, 
to whom instructions were issued for the inspection of surveys reported 
by the several surveyors-general as being ready for examination in the 
field. A portion of these examiners were actively engaged during the 
entire year, and the remainder were employed in the field during a 
part of the year according to the exigencies of the service and the 
conditions of the weather during the winter season. One clerk (an 
experienced surveyor) of the Division of Public Surveys was detailed 
as an examiner during a part of the year. The compensation and 
expenses of the examiners of surveys and the expenses of the detailed 
clerk were paid out of the fund of $80,000 assigned for field examina- 
tions, except in the case of the examination of surveys of Indian res- 
ervations and surveys of private land claims, when the cost was paid 
from the proper appropriation for Indian surveys and from the appro- 
priation for the survey of private land claims, respectively. 

During the fiscal year surveys executed under contracts or special 
instructions issued in lieu of contracts in the several surveying dis- 
tricts were accepted after thorough inspection in the field by the 
examiners and subsequent critical examination of the surveying returns 
in this Office and comparison with the reports of the examiners, as 
follows: 



Surveying districts. 


Contracts. 


Special 
instruc- 
tions. 


Surveying districts. 


Contracts. 


Special 

instruc- 
tions. 




11 

13 
2 
8 
7 
23 
• 1 



3 
1 


1 



New Mexico 


8 
3 
6 
5 

8 
l(i 
4 







North Dakota 









1 




South Dakota 







Utah 









1 
















The surveys accepted during the fiscal year, as reported in the above 
table, consisted in most cases of complete surveys under given con- 
tracts; in other cases the acceptances covered partial surveys, the 
entire work not being returned during the fiscal year. In a number 



22 REPOKT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

of cases surveys were accepted which had been suspended during 
prior years on account of errors in the field work reported by the 
examiners of surveys, or on account of defects in the returns, and, in 
other cases, portions of the surveys under certain contracts returned 
during the year, which were found to have been in accordance with 
contract and instructions, were accepted, but other portions of the 
work under such contracts were suspended awaiting corrections in the 
field. In three cases the surveys were found to have been so poorly 
executed as to necessitate their being held for rejection. 

In addition to the surveys accepted during the fiscal year 1904, after 
examinations in the field, there were accepted, without field examina- 
tion, surveys executed under two sets of special instructions in Cali- 
fornia, one in Colorado, three in Idaho, five in Minnesota, three in 
North Dakota, and three in Washington. These surveys all involved 
small liabilities or were so inconveniently situated that the expense of 
examination in the field would have been disproportionate to the cost 
of the surveys. The evidence afforded by the office examination of 
the returns appeared to show that the surveys had been executed as 
required by the instructions given to the surve}^or, who in each case 
bore a record for correct surveys, and they were accordingly accepted. 

The surveys accepted during the fiscal year included surveys within 
the following Indian reservations, viz: Chippewa Indian Reservation, 
Minn.; Crow Indian Reservation, Mont.; Pine Ridge and Standing 
Rock Indian reservations, S. Dak., and Tulalip Indian Reservation in 
the State of Washington. 

PRIVATE LAND CLAIM SURVEYS. 

During the fiscal year there were received returns of the survey of 
the following private land claims in Arizona and New Mexico, con- 
firmed under the provisions of the act of Congress approved March 
3, 1891 (26 Stat., 851), entitled, "An act to establish a Court of 
Private Land Claims, and to provide for the settlement of private land 
claims in certain States and Territories," said surveys having been 
duly approved by the Court of Private Land Claims, viz: In Arizona, 
the San Jose de Sonoita grant and the San Rafael de la Zanza grant; 
in New Mexico, the Santa Teresa grant, Refugio Colony grant, and 
the San Miguel del Bado grant. 



There were a number of surveys accepted during the year which 
were executed under contracts made by and special instructions issued 
from this Office, viz: The resurvey of the boundary line between the 
State of Colorado and the Territories of New Mexico and Oklahoma; 
the completion of the survey of the east boundary of the Yellowstone 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 23 

National Park; the completion of the surveys in several townships in 
Oklahoma where lands were omitted at the time of the original survey 
because of their mountainous character, and the survey of eight islands 
in Wisconsin, two in Michigan, and one in Iowa. 

SUSPENDED AND REJECTED SURVEYS. 

A gratifying improvement in the surveying service is indicated by 
the diminution in the number of surveys found, upon examination in 
the field, to be defective in execution. 

The causes of nonacceptance of surveys are defects discovered in 
the returns either by the surveyor-generals or this Office; errors 
developed by the field examinations, such as imperfect alignment, 
insufficient memorials, faulty monumentation, excess of limit of error 
in measurements, failure to properly mark the monuments and bear- 
ing trees, general carelessness in the work, and fraudulent surveys,, 
bearing no evidence of an attempt to comply with contract and 
instructions. 

During the } 7 ear survej^s were suspended under two contracts in 
California, four in Nevada, one each in New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, 
and Wyoming. In all of these cases, with the exception of three con- 
tracts in Nevada, portions of the surveys under each contract were 
found to have been properly executed and were duly accepted, and the 
remainder suspended for necessary corrections in the field or in the 
returns. The entire work under three contracts in Nevada was sus- 
pended because of general failure to comply with the requirements of 
the Manual of Surveying Instructions, and a correction in the field 
was ordered. 

The surveys under one contract in Arizona were rejected because of 
the failure on the part of the deputy surveyor to execute the surveys 
in his own proper person, as required by the terms of his contract. 
An appeal to the Department was taken in this case, and the action of 
this Office in rejecting the surveys was affirmed. In the case of one 
contract in New Mexico, the surveys were suspended several years 
ago and thirty days were allowed the deputy surveyor to correct the 
work in the field. An extension of time for making- the corrections 
was requested by the deputy and granted by this Office. No steps 
having been taken by the deputy in the matter of perfecting his sur- 
veys, the same were, in February last, rejected by this Office and the 
surveyor-general was authorized to let a new contract for the work. 

SOUTH BOUNDARY OF COLORADO. 

During the last fiscal year the final returns of the resuryey of this 
boundary line were filed. 

The field work of the resurvey was thoroughly inspected by an 



24 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

examiner of surveys and the astronomical work tested by an experi- 
enced astronomical engineer connected with this Office. The monu- 
ments along the line were reported to have been well within the 
requirements of the contract and special instructions, and the exami- 
nation of the field observations in the astronomical determinations 
showed very great care and accuracy on the part of the astronomer 
who conducted the instrumental work. The resurvey was accepted and 
maps filed in the offices of the surveyors-general of Colorado and New 
Mexico. 

Since the re-establishment numerous inquiries have been received as 
to the effect of the new location of the line upon lands lying along the 
boundary which have been thrown into the Territory of New Mexico, 
and questions of jurisdiction have arisen in consequence. 

This Office responds to such questions by the statement that the mat- 
ter of adoption of this line as the true boundary between the State of 
Colorado and the Territories of New Mexico and Oklahoma and the 
change of jurisdiction over adjoining lands will have to be settled and 
determined by negotiations between the United States and the State 
of Colorado, or otherwise, and I recommend that Congress be invited 
to take appropriate action thereon, and also to provide at the same 
time for the closing of the lines of public surveys to the new line. 

IDAHO-MONTANA BOUNDARY. 

Congress at its last session authorized the survey and marking of 
the unsurveyed portion of the line between the States of Idaho and 
Montana, estimated at 450 miles, and there was appropriated for this 
purpose the sum of $50,000. 

Upon the recommendation of this Office, I was authorized by the 
Department to enter into contract with Howard B. Carpenter, whose 
experience and qualifications were of the highest character, and whose 
excellent work in surveying the south boundaries of Utah and Colo- 
rado has been noted in previous reports. 

The Idaho-Montana boundary line is the only one remaining unsur- 
veyed and unmarked of all the lines between States and Territories of 
the United States. It follows the divide or watershed of the Bitter 
Root Mountain Range southwardly until it reaches the Rocky Moun- 
tains, or Continental Divide, the crest of which it then follows to its 
intersection with the east boundary of Idaho. 

The problem of ascertaining the true watershed of these two moun- 
tain ranges is an interesting one, requiring accurate judgment and 
experience in mountain topography and involving a multitude of 
recpnnoissance surveys as the establishment progresses. 

This important work was begun by the contractor in the spring of 
1904, and will probably require two seasons to complete. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 25 

LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE OBSERVATIONS TO DETERMINE LIMITS OF 
PUBLIC LANDS IN NEW MEXICO AND OKLAHOMA. 

At the date of iny last report Mr. Arthur D. Kidder, examiner of 
surveys of this Office, who was detailed to ascertain the true location of 
the one hundred and third meridian (east boundary of New Mexico) 
and also the proper intersection of this meridian with the latitude of 
32° north and the intersection of the one hundredth meridian with the 
latitude of 36° 30' north had nearly completed his determinations. 

During the last fiscal year Examiner Kidder completed his work, 
all the observations and determinations have been finished, and the 
results worked up in a detailed report submitted by him to this Office. 
This report, which is very thorough and exhaustive, giving* all partic- 
ulars of astronomical observations, deductions, and calculations, exhib- 
iting very clearly the conditions which exist along the one hundredth 
and one hundred and third meridians and the above-named latitude 
lines, and giving the amount of variation from their proper positions, 
was forwarded to the Department, with the suggestion that it be 
transmitted to Congress for the basis of any legislative action look- 
ing toward a re-establishment of the boundary lines of Oklahoma, New 
Mexico, and Texas which that body may deem best to take. 

FIELD EXAMINATION OF SETTLERS' APPLICATIONS FOR SURVEYS. 

Under the "Timber and Stone Act'' lands can be entered only after 
having been surveyed, and as the demand for the entry of lands under 
this act had reached enormous proportions in heavily timbered regions, 
owing to the desire to secure the timber, large areas were surveyed 
upon affidavits of settlement which were afterwards discovered to be 
fictitious. Parties were found to be engaged in manufacturing appli- 
cations for surveys, and on rocky land covered with thick growth of 
valuable timber it became a business to erect rude cabins of logs and 
to make a pretense of clearing off the land in order to form a basis to 
sworn statements that bona fide settlement was accomplished. 

During the last year it was decided to use the corps of examiners of 
surveys to investigate in the field all applications for surveys which 
alleged settlement, and the result has proven the wisdom of this course. 

In the timbered regions no real settlement to any extent was found, 
but in most cases a mere camping hut, without furniture and destitute 
of the means of housekeeping, was all that the examiner could dis- 
cover on the ground. It was learned that these alleged settlers resided 
in distant towns and cities, and that they were induced to lend their 
names by promises of rewards after the survey was accomplished, 
evidently having no intention to make their homes on the land. 

This investigation has thus far resulted in materially checking (lie 
rapid absorption by unscrupulous persons of the valuable timber now 
standing on the public lands in the mountain districts. 



26 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 
WITHDRAWALS OF LAND UNDER THE RECLAMATION ACT. 

Under your direction, this office has charge of the withdrawals of 
land for irrigation purposes. It carries out the orders of the Depart- 
ment in these cases by directing the local land offices to note that 
entries are suspended in certain townships. 

Under the act two forms of withdrawal are authorized. 

The first form makes provision for absolute withdrawal from all 
forms of disposal, owing to the desire on the part of the Department 
to use the withdrawal tracts for reservoir sites. 

The second form suspends all disposals except for homesteads, and 
restricts the latter to certain limited areas and provides that the home- 
steader shall conform to requirements in respect to using the water. 
These withdrawn lands are the tracts intended to be benefited by the 
irrigation works, and they are made temporary at first so that in case 
the project is not found feasible the lands may be restored to entry. 

This office records and promulgates all withdrawals, which involves 
considerable clerical labor, as the amount of acreage of withdrawn 
lands at the close of the fiscal year was in excess of 33,000,000 acres, 
consisting of blocks of land set apart from time to time upon recom- 
mendation of the Director of the United States Geological Survey as 
the surveys progress. 

SURVEYS IN UINTAH INDIAN RESERVATION 1 . 

This large reservation, embracing over 2,000,000 acres, was by Con- 
gressional enactment authorized to be surveyed in its entirety and 
thrown open to settlement and entry on October 1, 1904. 

Township and subdivisional surveys had been made within the 
reservation twenty and thirty years ago for the purpose of allotment, 
and the additional surveys authorized were intended to complete the 
subdivision of the w T hole reservation. Contracts were let amounting 
to $94,000, but owing to early snows in 1903 only a small portion of 
the eighteen contracts was finished, and it was found that the field 
work of the remainder could not be finished in the season of 1904, 
examined, and field notes and plats prepared in time to admit of open- 
ing the reservation on October 1, 1904. Congress then extended the 
time to March 10, 1905. 

At the close of the last fiscal year many of the contracts were com- 
pleted and inspection was in progress. It is believed that all the 
surve}^s will be executed and allotments made before the end of the 
calendar year, so that the opening ma}^ take place at the time appointed. 
The only contingency that may arise, and it is one that accompanies 
all public land surveys, is that the surveys may upon inspection be 
pronounced defective in some particulars and require correction in 
order to conform to the requirements of the Manual, but as extraordi- 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 27 

nary precautions were taken to let contracts for this work only to 
reliable surveyors, it is thought that few erroneous surveys will be 
made. 

SURVEYS IN ALASKA. 

At the date of my last report this Office was awaiting the result of 
an investigation to be made by an examiner of surveys ordered to 
Alaska to inquire into the conditions there in respect to surveys of 
the public lands. 

Mr. J. Frank Warner was selected for this mission and has made a 
thorough investigation of Alaskan surveys. His report is appended. 

This Office had previously suspended action on numerous claims 
surveyed under the act of June 3, 1891. and the act of May 10, 1898, 
as the returns of such surveys seem to indicate that the law had not 
been strictly complied with. The examiner's report confirmed the 
correctness of this surmise, and this Office rejected the survej^s, requir- 
ing new and correct lines and the establishment of adequate corners. 

The matter of initiating the mission surveys was 'inquired into, and 
after receiving the examiner's report, contracts for the survey of all 
of the mission claims were authorized. Owing, however, to the dela} r s 
incident to the vast distance to the surveyor-general's office, and to 
misunderstandings on the part of the contractors as to compensation, 
this Office succeeded in perfecting only a small fraction of the contracts 
for the groups of mission surve}^s at the close of the last fiscal year. 
It is expected that this work will now proceed to completion by the 
close of another year.. 

The establishment of the base and meridian lines necessaiw to initi- 
ate the rectangular system of public land surveys in Alaska has been 
attended with much difficulty, owing to the reluctance of reliable sur- 
veyors to undertake such work in the face of the enormous obstacles 
found in this district. The report of an examiner was awaited prior 
to selecting a surveyor for the work. 

Upon his recommendation a contract was entered into with a deputy 
surveyor who, it is believed, is qualified to carry the work of the basic 
lines to a successful completion. The contract was let during the last 
fiscal year, but it is doubtful if the surveys will be finished during the 
season of 1904. 

Owing to insurmountable difficulties in the establishment of the reg- 
ular base, standard, and meridian lines, difficulties which were not 
met with outside of Alaska, the progress of public surveys in Alaska 
will necessarily be vexatiously slow, but as soon as the base and 
standard lines are surveyed it is expected that the surveys of the 
desirable lands will proceed with greater expedition than this office 
has up to the present time been able to attain. 



28 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 
RESURVEYS IN COLORADO. 

At its last session Congress authorized extensive resurveys in north- 
western Colorado, in Routt and Rio Blanco counties, there having been 
brought to the attention of Congress the fact long known to this office 
that grave defects existed in the original surveys executed many years 
ago at a time when no inspections were made prior to payment 
therefor. 

Nearl} 7 a hundred townships were involved. The surveyor-general 
of Colorado was directed in June last to enter into contracts for 
resurveys, the liability of which amounted to $50,000. Ten contracts 
were let, and the work is being vigorously prosecuted. 

RAILROAD GRANTS. 

During the fiscal year there were certified and patented under the 
several grants made by Congress to aid in the construction of rail- 
roads and wagon roads 4,551,071.66 acres, and 216 railroad and 
wagon-road patents were issued. 

Of the area embraced in railroad and wagon-road listings and selec- 
tions, 4,660 acres were canceled. 

There were docketed and reinstated during the year 461 cases, and 
348 were closed. Of the 1,200 cases pending at the close of the } r ear, 
178 only were ready for action, the balance having been already 
decided or suspended. Of the 1,130 entries on hand for action during 
the year, 418 were disposed of, leaving 712 pending June 30, 1904, 
of which 342 are included in docket cases and 345 are suspended, 
leaving 25 reacty for action. 

The 385 applications for lands within the State of Michigan which 
were pending at the beginning of the year have all been disposed of. 

Of the 10,577 letters that were on hand for action during the year 
all but 205 were disposed of. 

ADJUSTMENTS. 

The suit brought b} 7 the United States against the Northern Pacific 
Railroad Company and the Northern Pacific Railway to cancel patents 
issued to the railroad company, to which the railway company is suc- 
cessor, was decided by the United States Supreme Court February 
23, 1904 (193 U. S., 1), in favor of the company, and relieved from 
suspension a large number of claims for lands lying north of Portland, 
Ore., and within the overlapping limits of that company's grant b} r the 
joint resolution of May 31, 1870, and the forfeited portion of its grant 
by the act of July 2, 1864. All these claims have been examined with 
a view to their adjustment under the provisions of the act of July 1, 
1898 (30 Stat., 597, 620), excepting those wherein patents have issued 
and which for that reason do not come within the purview of said act; 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 29 

159 have been listed for approval and have been approved by the 
Department for relinquishment by the company, and the company has 
been called upon to make the relinquishments. The remainder, except- 
ing the few cases where the individual claimants have elected to relin- 
quish, and which have received appropriate action, have either been 
rejected as not coming within the law authorizing the relinquishment, 
or the settlers called upon to make their election to retain or relin- 
quish the land, or are ready for listing for submission to the Department 
for approval for relinquishment by the company. 

In addition to the above there have been before the Office for action 
during the year 84:9 cases under the act of July 1, 1898, in different 
localities, 244 of which have been closed, and 457 were considered and 
received action looking to the final disposal. The railroad company 
has filed relinquishments in 248 cases, embraced in 24 lists, approved 
by the Department, and relieved them from conflict. 

The act of March 2, 1899 (30 Stat., 993), provided for the relinquish- 
ment by the Northern Pacific Railroad Company to the United States 
and the selection of other lands in lieu thereof of the Mount Rainier 
National Park and the Pacific Forest Reserve, and the release and 
reconveyance was duly made. The lines of survey have been pro- 
tracted by calculation over said park and reserve, and the area of the 
odd-numbered sections therein and within the primary limits of the 
company's grant, which are the lands this Office has held the company 
is entitled to relinquish and select lieu for, has been computed and 
a complete examination has been made of all lists of selections filed 
by the company in lieu of the land relinquished, but the claims of the 
company under this act could not be finally adjusted and closed for 
the reasons that many of the selections are still unsurveyed and some 
are in conflict with other claims, and also that the company claims the 
right of selection in lieu of lands within its indemnity limits and the 
Pacific Forest Reserve, which question has not yet been determined 
by the Department. 

An examination has been made of the lands lying within the over- 
lapping indemnity limits of the grant to the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company, main line, and the primary limits of the forfeited Atlantic 
and Pacific Railroad grant, and lists prepared of all the lands therein 
which have been patented to the Southern Pacific Company, of all 
lands which have been selected by said company but not patented, and 
of all lands which have been applied for by it and the applications are 
pending, for the purpose of preparing a record for the institution of 
suit against the Southern Pacific Company for the recovery of the 
patented lands and for quieting the title in the United States in all 
other odd sections of lands within said overlap, the right of selection 
of which is claimed by said company, and the suit has been brought. 

Upon examination of the proofs made on their holdings by settlers 



30 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

in New Mexico, known as "small-holding claimants," under sections 
16, 17, and 18 of the act of March 3, 1891 (26 Stat., 854), as amended 
by the acts of February 21, 1893 (27 Stat., 470), and June 27, 1898 
(30 Stat., 495), it was found that their claims covered in whole or in 
part odd-numbered sections within the limits of the grant to the Atlan- 
tic and Pacific Railroad Company which had passed under said grant 
and could not be secured to the settlers. The railroad company was 
called upon to relinquish its claim under the provisions of the act of 
June 22, 1874 (18 Stat., 194), but declined to do so for the reason that 
the claims of the settlers in many instances covered but a small part 
of a section, and such part being the only, part fit for agricultural pur- 
poses would leave the balance of the section unsalable; and thereupon 
Congress passed the act of April 28, 1904 (33 Stat., 556). 

This latter act authorizes the railroad company, when requested b} T 
the Secretary of the Interior so to do, to relinquish to the United 
States any part or the whole of any section covered b}^ the claims of 
these settlers within the Territory of New Mexico and select other 
lands of equal quality in lieu thereof, as may be agreed upon with the 
Secretary of the Interior. Following this act, an examination was 
made of the records and plats of this office and a list of all the small- 
holding claimants shown by them was prepared, which, together with 
instructions for carrying the act into effect, was transmitted to the 
local land officers. 

Under the act of March 3, 1903, which provided for the relief of 
certain settlers in Alabama on lands within the limits of the^ grants to 
aid in the construction of the Mobile and Girard and the Tennessee 
and Coosa railroads by authorizing the relinquishment to the United 
States of any land recovered in any court of competent jurisdiction 
from such settlers, by either of said railroad companies or its assigns, 
releases have been made, submitted to, and accepted by the Depart- 
ment in 104 cases, and proper action looking to securing title to the 
homesteaders or the parties claiming under them have been taken. 

The large number of cases involving lands within the State of Min- 
nesota and within the limits of the grants by Congress to aid in the 
construction of the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railwaj r , 
main line and branches, which had been suspended pending the adjust- 
ments of said grants and were relieved from suspension during the 
previous year try the completion of the adjustment, have all been 
disposed of. 

Congress passed an act. which was approved February 26, 1904 (33 
Stat., 51), for "the relief of settlers on lands in Sherman County, in 
the State of Oregon." The lands referred to are those lying within 
the limits of the grant b\ T the act of February 25, 1867 (14 Stat., 409), 
to aid in the construction of The Dalles militaiy wagon road, and the 
withdrawal on that portion of the grant to the Northern Pacific Rail- 



REPOET OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 31 

road (now Railway) Company along the Columbia River between 
Wallula, Wash., and Portland, Ore., which was declared forfeited 
by the act of September 29, 1890. Under a departmental ruling 
these lands were held to have been excepted from the wagon-road 
grant, were opened to entry, and numerous parties settled upon them 
and made entries. Subsequently, the United States Supreme Court 
decided that they passed under the wagon-road grant, and the claims 
of the settlers having failed, it was with a view to the relief of per- 
sons who made settlement, entry, and improvement of these lands that 
the act of February 26, 1901, was passed. 

That act authorized and directed the Secretary of the Interior to 
make a very extensive investigation to determine what claimants there 
are, the reasonable value of the lands settled upon, the dates of the 
settlements, and the value of the improvements of the several classes 
at the several elates named. 

Instructions have been prepared and transmitted to the local land 
officers, and a special agent, who has been detailed to make the investi- 
gation, for their guidance in collecting the information desired by 
Congress. 

Instructions under the act of April 19, 1901 (33 Stat.. 181), "for the 
relief of certain settlers upon Wisconsin Central Railroad and The 
Dalles Military Road land grants," were prepared, approved by the 
Department, and issued. 

This act directed that certain persons who settled upon and improved 
lands in Wisconsin within the conflicting limits of the grants to the 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway and the Wiscon- 
sin Central Railroad grants, and the lands in Oregon above described, 
be given credit for the period of their bona fide residence upon, and 
the amount of their improvements made on the lands for which they 
were unable to complete title, when making proof on homestead 
entries of other lands; but it is not believed that the settlers on The 
Dalles Military Road lands will seek the benefits of this act, in view of 
the legislation contemplated by the act of February 26, 1904 (supra). 

RIGHTS OF WAV. 

By the act of March 3, 1875 (18 Stat., 182), Congress granted to 
railroads upon certain conditions right of way through the public 
lands. 

Rights of way for railroads, wagon roads, and tram roads in Alaska 
were granted upon certain conditions by the act of May 14. L898 (30 
Stat, 109). 

Under the provisions of these acts and special acts. 664 companies 
have filed articles of incorporation which have been accepted, 34 of 
which were accepted during the fiscal year ended June r><>. L904. 



32 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Right of way has been approved to 615 companies, 20 of which received 
their first approval during the same period. 

There were received during- the year 509 maps of locations of rail- 
roads, which, with those already pending, made a total of 628 maps on 
hand for action during the year; of these, 172 have been approved, 30 
have been filed (not requiring approval), and 397 have been otherwise 
disposed of, 21 of which were rejected, the rest having been returned 
for correction, leaving 33 awaiting action June 30, 1904. 

Under sections 18 to 21 of the act of March 3, 1891, as amended by 
section 2, act of May 11, 1898, rights of way have been approved to 
579 companies, individuals, and associations of individuals, of which 
138 received their first approval during the past year. 

There were received during the year 464 maps, which, with those 
already pending, made a total of 561 maps on hand for action during 
the year; of these, 151 have been approved, 20 have been filed (not 
requiring approval), and 288 have been otherwise disposed of, a few 
of which were rejected, the rest being returned for correction, leaving 
102 awaiting action June 30, 1904. 

Under the act of February 15, 1901, authorizing the Secretary of 
the Interior to permit the use of rights of way through public lands, 
reservations, or national parks for telegraph and telephone lines, elec- 
trical and water plants, canals, reservoirs, etc., for the storage and 
conveyance of water, and all beneficial uses, applications have been 
approved for 33 companies, individuals, and associations of individuals. 
Twenty eight maps filed under the provisions of this act were pending 
July 1, 1903; -56 maps were received during the year, of which 33 
were approved and 20 otherwise disposed of, most of the latter by 
returning for correction. 

By the act of January 13, 1897, the construction of reservoirs for 
watering live stock upon unoccupied public lands, not mineral or other- 
wise reserved, is permitted upon certain conditions. There were 
pending under this act at the beginning of the year 4,073 declaratory 
statements; there were received during the year 858 new applications, 
making a total of 4,931 applications susceptible of being acted upon 
during the year. Of these, 2,459 were acted upon as follows: Canceled 
or relinquished, 1,986; held for rejection or amendment, 419; approved, 
54. The foregoing number having been acted upon, there remained 
pending unacted upon on June 30, 1904, 2,472 applications of this 
character. 

Under the provisions of the tramroad act of 1895, as amended by 
the act of 1898, applications for permission to use right of way have 
been approved to 12 companies, individuals, and associations of indi- 
viduals, 2 of which received their first approval during the past year. 
There was received during the year under these acts 1 map, which, 
with those already pending, made a total of 3 maps on hand for 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 33 

action during the year; of these 2 were approved as aforesaid and 1 
returned for correction (since which time it has not been refiled), thus 
clearing- the docket of maps of this character. 

By section 4, act of August 18, 1894 (28 Stat. ,'372-422), provision 
is made for the donation to each of the States in which there may be 
situated desert lands of not more than 1,000,000 acres of such lands as 
the State may cause to be irrigated, reclaimed, occupied, and cultiva- 
ted by actual settlers. This act has been amended by a provision of 
the act of May 11, 1896, to the effect that a lien is authorized to be cre- 
ated by the State upon the lands segregated, and that when an ample 
supply of water is actually furnished to any tract or tracts thereof, 
patent shall issue to the State for the same without regard to settle- 
ment or irrigation; and a further amendment by section 2, act of 
March 3, 1901 (31 Stat,, 1133-1188), by which it is" provided that the 
time for the reclamation of the lands in each list shall be ten years 
from the date of its approval. If the land shall not be irrigated and 
reclaimed in that time, the Secretary of the Interior may continue the 
segregation of the land for a period not exceeding five years, or he 
ma}' restore such lands to the public domain. 

Lists have been filed by the States during the year, as follows: 

Acres. 

State of Colorado, 1, covering 1, 381. 27 

State of Oregon, 5, aggregating 17, 783. 60 

State of Wyoming, 5, aggregating 86, 019. 63 

State of Idado, 2, aggregating Ill, 130. 77 

Lists have been approved during the year, as follows: 

Acres. 

State of Idaho, 2, aggregating 24, 241. 22 

State of Montana, 1, covering 3, 675. 22 

State of Oregon, 2, aggregating 28, 284. 83 

State of Wyoming, 7, aggregating 236, 986. 93 

Patents have been issued under said act during the year, as follows: 

Acres. 

State of Montana, 1, covering 10,104.03 

State of Wyoming, 3, aggregating _• 18, 413. 03 

There have been relinquished, rejected, and otherwise disposed of 
lands in Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washing- 
ton, and Wyoming aggregating 610,334.35 acres. 

Private, Indian, School, and Arid Lands. 

The scope of the work of this division is the same as it was at the 
date of the last annual report. 

There have been 2,345 entries under the various public land laws 
approved for patenting, 41 small holding or donation claims, 45 pri- 
vate land claims, and 3,013 Indian allotments, making a total of 5.4 14 
cases approved for patent. Ten applications for scrip under the act 
8970—04 3 



34 KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

of June 2, 1858, have been approved, embracing 1,582.32 acres, and 
four applications have been rejected. 

Of original desert land entries 7,689 have been examined, 10,816 
yearly proofs, and 761 assignments, and 1,617 entries have been can- 
celed. 

Two thousand four hundred and twent} 7 -nine original timber-culture 
entries have been canceled, 131 contests decided, and 106 closed during 
the year. 

Selections under various grants to the different States have been 
approved for 487,061.51 acres. 

There are pending 70 preemption entries, 2,565 final desert-land 
entries, 427 final timber-culture entries, 78 commuted timber-culture 
entries, 108 town-lot entries, and 1,271 Indian allotments. The State 
selections pending embrace an area of 1,685,002.46 acres, of which 
1,177,338.08 acres are embraced in school-indemnit} 7 lists. For man} 7 
years a large number of private land claims have been reported as 
pending, but this does not correctly represent the situation. While 
man3 T private claims remain unpatented, they are not strictly pending 
before this Office; because, while duly confirmed and surveyed, they 
have never been called up by the confirmees or their legal representa- 
tives, and the owners being unknown to this Office, it has long been 
the practice to issue patents onl} 7 for such claims as are called up by 
the interested parties. Of these ca^es there are very few which have 
not been approved for patenting. 

A large proportion of the extensive private grants in the Territory 
of New Mexico have not been patented, for the reason that the own- 
ers have not reimbursed the Government for the cost of survey, as 
provided by law. 

Forty town-site entries have been received and approved for patent- 
ing, and 39 town-site entries have been received and are pending. 

Contests. 

The work of this division consists of the examination and decision 
of contests in homestead, timber culture, desert land, and timber and 
stone entries. 

The cases that are examined in this division as the result of contests 
initiated in the various local offices are classified as follows: 

First. Cases on appeal from decisions of the local officers on the 
merits thereof, called docket cases. 

Second. Cases on appeal from the rejection of application to con- 
test, applications to make entry, and other ex parte proceedings, 
called miscellaneous appeals. 

Third. Cases in which there is no appeal from the decision of the 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 35 

local officers, but which must be reviewed by this Office in order to 
determine whether the decisions are rendered in accordance with 
existing laws and regulations, called unappealed cases. 

Fourth. Applications to be permitted to contest an entry of record, 
or for hearings before the local officers where the same have been 
denied, or the local officers have no power under the rules and regu- 
lations to grant the same. 

Fifth. Motions for rehearing and review. 

During the last year there has been not only a large increase of 
land contests over any previous year, but the amount of work per- 
formed far surpasses that of any previous year, considering the num- 
ber of clerks engaged in this work. 

There were 1,128 appealed cases received from local offices during 
the year, an increase of 201: over the preceding year. There were 
1,231 appealed cases decided, an increase of 826 over the preceding- 
year. 

There were 4,786 unappealed cases examined and closed during the 
year, an increase of 782 over the preceding year. 

There were 3,000 more letters and decisions written in this division 
than during the preceding year and an increase of 200 appeals to the 
Secretary for the year. 

This division is about seven months behind on appealed cases and 
three months on unappealed cases, a gain of three months and one 
month, respectively, for the year. 

Swamp Lands and Swamp Land Indemnity. 

New claims to swamp land in place were reported during the year 
ended June 30, 1901, in favor of the several States to which the swamp 
land grants have been extended, amounting to 259,691.27 acres. This 
is an increase of 27,575.56 acres over the amount reported during the 
preceding year. The amount of swamp lands patented was 259,207.23 
acres, a decrease of 2,650,510.65 acres from the acreage patented the 
preceding 3 T ear, which is accounted for by the fact that during that 
3^ear one patent was issued covering 2,862,280 acres, in the Everglades 
and Mangrove Swamp of Florida. Claims to the amount of 128,795.80 
acres were rejected. 

Swamp land indemnity claims were finally disposed of as follows: 

Cash indemnity paid amounting to $1,926.20, on the basis of 1,510.96 
acres; land indemnity certified 200 acres; and cash and land indemnity 
rejected on the basis of 121,080 acres. 

The number of contests against swamp land claims decided was 90; 
and the number of entries and locations in conflict with swamp laud 
claims relieved or canceled was 118. 



36 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

United States and State Maps. 

The completion and delivery of the 1902 United States map was 
prevented after the receipt of only 200 copies by the Baltimore fire, 
and on March 1, 1904, the lithographers were advised of their release 
from further liability under the contract. By act of Congress 
approved March 28, 1904, the unexpended balance under this contract 
was made available for the 1904 edition. Steps were immediately 
taken to hasten the completion of the 1903 edition, and about 3,000 
copies of this map have been received up to June 30, 1904. 

The work of bringing the copper-plate base of the United States 
map up to date for the 1904 edition is being pushed as rapidly as may 
be. Contract for lithographing 63,000 copies of the 1904 map, more 
or less, has been entered into with a Philadelphia firm, who have 
expressed their readiness to take up the work promptly, as soon as 
transfers are delivered to them, which will be in a few weeks. The 
contract for printing this edition provides that within five weeks after 
order is received to print, the first 10,000 copies are to be delivered; 
that four weeks shall be allowed for the delivery of the second and 
each succeeding 10,000 copies, and that the entire edition is to be com- 
pleted within twenty-five weeks after the work of printing is begun. 

The compilation of a map of Washington is well in hand; maps of 
Wyoming and Minnesota have been revised and partly recompiled, 
and are read}^ for final tracing; while a new map of Michigan is now 
ready for the lithographers, as soon as contract is entered into for the 
new fiscal year. New editions of Nevada, New Mexico, and Arizona 
have been received since June 30, 1903. 

Mineral Lands. 

There were pending July 1, 1903, 2,967 mineral entries, and 1,821 
were received during the year, of which number 2,591 were approved 
for patenting and 42 canceled. And there were pending on July 1, 
1904, 2,155 entries, of which 1,221 are awaiting examination and 934 
have been examined and suspended. 

There were pending July 1, 1903, 129 coal entries, and 210 were 
received during the year, of which number 172 have been approved 
for patenting and 167 were pending July 1, 1904. 

On July 1, 1903, there were 141 mineral contests pending, and 83 
were received during the year, of which number 102 have been decided 
and closed, leaving 122 pending July 1, 1904, of which number 97 have 
been examined but not closed and 25 awaiting original examination. 

Protecting Public Lands. 

On July 1, 1903, there were pending in this division 18,341 entries 
and filings awaiting reports from special agents or action upon reports 
already received or hearings had under such reports. During the past 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 37 

year there have been received in the division 10,224 entries and filings. 
Of the total number, 1,290 entries were held for cancellation or sus- 
pended on special agents' reports; 540 hearings were ordered on such 
reports; 1,231 entries were canceled for various reasons; and 1,592 
entries were approved for patent; 7,285 entries were relieved from 
suspension and referred to other divisions for appropriate action, leav 
18,457 entries and tilings in this division July 1, 1904. Nearly all of 
the pending entries are in course of examination by either the special 
agents or the office with a view to their final disposition. The slight 
increase in the number of alleged fraudulent entries pending in this 
division over that shown b}^ my last annual report, is due largely to 
departmental instructions of November 18, 1902, directing investiga- 
tion of timber and stone entries in the States of Oregon, California, 
and Washington. The special agents have been directed to report the 
result of their investigations of this class of cases at the earliest possi- 
ble moment, and the office has been exerting every effort to lessen the 
number of entries under suspension. More than 6,000 of such entries 
have been relieved from suspension during the past year. 

With respect to unlawful inclosures, 137 reports were received, 
showing an area of 1,353,567 acres of public land unlawfully inclosed. 
Through the efforts of the special agents, 39 unlawful inclosures, 
embracing 717,505 acres of public land, have been removed, and pro 
ceedings are pending to compel the removal of the remaining cases 
reported. Specific instructions have been given the special agents to 
secure the removal of all unlawful inclosures upon the public lands, 
and the Office is pleased to say that material progress is being made in 
this direction, many of the maintainers of such inclosures proceeding 
to remove their fences as soon as their attention is called by the special 
agents to the requirements of the law. In some cases, however, legal 
proceedings have been found necessar} 7 to impress upon the violators 
of the law the determination of this Office to keep the public lands 
open to the home builder. 

In the matter of timber depredations there has been a notable 
decrease both in the value and amount of timber unlawfully taken 
from the public lands. During the year, 347 cases of timber trespass 
were reported, involving timber of the value of $337,515.43; 48 civil 
suits were recommended for the recovery of damages for such tres- 
passes; QS propositions of settlement, involving $53,398.40, were 
accept'ed; and the sales of timber unlawfully cut, and seized by special 
agents as Government propert}^, amounted to $9,668.43. There was 
turned into the public Treasury for tines imposed and judgments 
rendered in prosecutions for timber trespass the sum of $17,270.86, 
and the amount recovered through compromises of timber trespass 
suits was $25,733.90. On July 1, 1904. there were pending in the 
United States courts 125 civil suits for the recovery of $2,009,863.30, 



38 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

representing the value of timber alleged to have been unlawfully 
taken from the public lands, and 324 criminal prosecutions for cutting 
and removing such timber in violation of law. 

In my last annual report mention was made of the fact that the act 
of March 11, 1902 (32 Stat., 63), permitting the affidavits, proofs, and 
oaths required of applicants under the homestead, preemption, timber- 
culture, desert land and timber and stone laws to be made before cer- 
tain officers named in the act, other than the local officers, had facili- 
tated the making of entries in violation of law. To remedy this evil 
as far as possible the local officers have been directed to advise parties 
desiring to make final proof before other officers than themselves that 
the final proofs, if so made, would possibly be suspended until an 
examination thereof could be had by a special agent. The special 
agents have been directed, when parties insist upon making final 
proofs outside of the local offices, to arrange such times and places 
therefor as will permit of their being present to examine the claimants 
and witnesses. This plan it is hoped will result in materially reduc- 
ing the number of hearings in connection with alleged fraudulent 
entries, and every effort is being made to secure an investigation of 
all claims prior to the issuance of final certificates, in which the local 
officers and the special agents are not satisfied that the law has been 
complied with. 

With respect to soldiers' additional homestead rights, under sections 
2306 and 2307 of the Revised Statutes, the Office is vigorously prose- 
cuting an investigation of all assignments which are not absolutely 
perfect upon the face of the records. Experience has demonstrated 
the necessity for a rigid inspection of these claims. During the past 
year 237 of these applications have been canceled and 346 have been 
relieved from suspension. All soldiers' additional cases are now exam- 
ined by this division and are by it referred to special agents whenever 
investigation is deemed necessary. 

There is a growing need for a large and especially for an efficient 
force of special agents to protect the public interests in the unappro- 
priated portions of the public domain. During the past year the 
Office has exerted every effort to give the special service branch of 
the work the attention it deserves. Instructions have been issued in 
which the duties of the agents are clearly pointed out. Books for 
keeping their records in a business-like manner have been supplied. 
They have been made to feel that they are a part of the Office, and 
they have shown a gratifying disposition to heartily co-operate in the 
efforts of the office to attain a high standard of efficiency in this 
branch of the service. In appreciation of the work of the Office Con- 
gress has appropriated an amount sufficient to permit of the employ- 
ment of about seventy -five agents. The showing made by the detailed 
statement of the work of this division, with respect to the number of 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 39 

reports received from the special agents during the past year, has refer- 
ence only to those matters which required the making of formal reports 
as a basis for action by this Office. A large part of their work is per- 
formed in connection with matters, such as representing the Govern- 
ment at hearings in land cases; assisting the United States attorneys, 
and testifying in legal proceedings involving the public lands; pre- 
venting the spread of forest fires upon the public domain, and lessen- 
ing the causes in which the fires have their origin; supervising the 
cutting of timber upon the public lands under free permits, and 
investigating more or less unfounded complaints of timber trespass, 
fraudulent entries, and unlawful inclosures, in which it has been found 
to be impracticable to require them to make extended reports, and 
in which the action taken by them appears only in their weekly 
detailed statements of work done. The most efficient special agents 
are those who, by prompt and intelligent action in their field, put a 
stop, in their inception, to fraudulent and unlawful schemes in con- 
nection with the public lands, thereby rendering action by the Office 
unnecessar} 7 . 

FOREST RESERVES. 

Since June 30, 1903, nine additional forest reserves have been estab- 
lished under section 24 of the act of March 3, 1891 (26 Stat., 1095); 
one has been abolished (the Crow Creek Forest Reserve, in Wyoming); 
the areas of four have been somewhat reduced; two have been enlarged; 
and two have been consolidated, as follows: The Pine Mountain and 
Zaca Lake Forest Reserve and the Santa Ynez Forest Reserve, in the 
State of California, have been consolidated under the name of the 
Santa Barbara Forest Reserve. In effecting this consolidation an 
additional area consisting of a private land grant lying between the 
two reserves was included. 

There are now 59 forest reserves, created by Presidential proclama- 
tion under said act of March 3, 1891, embracing 62,763,494 acres. 

The total increase in the area of forest reserves since June 30, 1903, 
is 408,529 acres. 

The work in this Office connected with the extension of forest- 
reserve area and the adjustment of boundaries of existing reserves has 
now reached the stage where most careful deliberation is demanded, 
the most urgent need for establishing such reserves having been met. 
Both the importance of the objects to be accomplished by the reserves 
and the many local interests to be considered necessitate great care in 
proceeding further in this direction. The Government can well 
afford, at this juncture, to delay action in establishing additional 
reserves until the force of forest experts now engaged upon the work- 
can, by practical field examinations and the necessary scientific 
research, establish beyond reasonable doubt in what localities and to 
what exent further areas should be set apart for this purpose. 



40 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 
LANDS RELEASED FROM TEMPORARY WITHDRAWAL. 

The delay in determining what further reserves will be ultimately 
proclaimed has necessitated holding extensive areas temporarily with- 
drawn, in order to prevent speculative appropriation of the lands in 
advance of the creation of the reserves. As rapidly as the reserves 
are finally established these withdrawals are revoked as regards all 
lands not included therein. From June 30, 1903, to October 1, 1904, 
3,632,500 acres were restored to the public domain and thrown open 
to settlement and entry. By virtue of the authority vested in the 
Land Department and in accordance with an opinion of the Assistant 
Attorney-General for the Interior Department, all lands of this char- 
acter are now thrown open to settlement as soon as restored to the 
public domain, but are not open to entry or selection until after 
notice to that effect has been published for sixty days. . 

ENTRY OF AGRICULTURAL LANDS WITHIN FOREST RESERVES. 

In the preliminary report by the Commission on the Public Lands 
attention was drawn to the importance of having all the land within 
the borders of forest reserves put to the best use, in consequence of 
which it was recommended that such lands be opened to agricultural 
entry, under suitable restrictions and limitations prescribed by law. 

A bill (H. R. 13631), prepared in accordance with this recommenda- 
tion, was introduced in Congress on March 8 last, but failed of action. 
In view of the importance of this measure, its enactment into law is 
greatly to be desired, and I accordingly urgently recommend the pas- 
sage of the bill. 

FOREST RESERVE FORCE. 

The practical work of patrolling the reserves, and managing the 
many and varied interests connected with the administration of the 
same, has progressed satisfactorily, as far as the means at command 
for such work admitted. Following the usual policy, the force was 
expanded to its utmost during the danger or fire season, and corre- 
spondingl} 7 reduced when that had passed. As the result as many as 
484 rangers were placed in the field when most needed to protect 
certain of the reserves. The smallest number employed at any time 
during the year was 200. 

STOCK GRAZING IN FOREST RESERVES. 

All that was said in my last annual report relative to grazing in 
forest reserves applies with equal force at the present time. Owing 
to the enlargement of some of the reserves, and the creation of new 
ones during the past year, there has been an increase in the total num- 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 41 

ber of both sheep and cattle and horses allowed to graze in the reserves 
and in the number of permits issued. 

There are now 57 reserves, exclusive of the Afognak and Alexander 
Archipelago reserves in Alaska, containing an area of 57,853,614 acres. 
There have been issued 843 permits to graze 1,806,722 head of sheep 
in 20 of these reserves, and 5,822 permits to graze 610,091 head of 
cattle and horses in 48 of them. 

In addition, 16 conditional permits have been issued to graze 38,100 
head of sheep in the Washington Forest Reserve, to be delivered only 
in case the grazing areas desired are found by the forest superintendent 
to be as represented by the sheep owners. 

The following table shows the total permits and stock for each of 
the years 1901 to 1904, inclusive, and the tables under the business 
statement of my report show the details for each reserve: 





Num- 
ber of 

re- 
serve. 


Area in re- 
serves (ex- 
clusive of 
Alaska, ) 


Cattle and horses. 


Sheep. 


Total 

per- 
mits. 


Year. 


Re- 
st' rves 
open to. 


Per- 
mits. 


Stock. 


Re- 
serves 
open to. 


Per- 
mits. 


Stock. 


1901 


40 
52 
53 

57 


46,006,569 
55, 265, 885 
57,445,085 
57, 853, 614 


32 
37 
44 

48 


1,926 
2,642 
4,121 
5,822 


277,621 
357,552 
529,973 
610, 091 


8 

8 

14 

20 


391 
484 
433 

843 


1,214,418 
1,151,513 
1,432,567 
1,806,722 


2,317 
3,126 
4,554 
6,665 


1902 


1903 


1904 







In addition to the above, the cattle and horses that grazed last sea- 
son on the lands now in the Baker City Forest Reserve in Oregon 
are allowed to graze in the reserve informally during the season of 
1904, bat all sheep are prohibited; and in the Salt Lake City reserves 
in Utah all the stock that grazed on the lands last season are allowed 
in the reserves informally during the season of 1904, but thereafter 
sheep will be prohibited. 

The Department issued six permits, under paragraph 22 of the cir- 
cular of May 22, 1903, allowing 16,100 head of sheep to cross the 
reserve lands to reach 42,608 acres of private lands within the Sierra 
Forest Reserve. 

There have also been issued by the forest officers quite a large num- 
ber of permits, under paragraph 23 of said circular, allowing stock, 
principally sheep, to cross certain reserves to reach shipping points or 
grazing grounds outside of the reserves, from four to fifteen da} r s 
being allowed each band of sheep to make the crossing. These cross- 
ings usually occur twice a year, the stock going one way early in the 
season and back again in the fall. In some instances, however, they 
go but one way to reach some shipping point. I have therefore, 
divided these crossings into two periods, one from July 1 to Decem- 
ber 31, 1903, and the other from January 1 to June :'><», L904. The 
following table shows these crossings for each reserve: 



42 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Sheep crossing permits. 



Reserve. 


July 1 to December 
31, 1903. 


January 1 to June 30, 
1904. 




Permits. 


Sheep. 


Permits. 


Sheep. 




52 
19 


185, 965 
59, 800 


57 
8 
2 
23 
30 
1 
1 


178, 950 




42, 150 
6,400 




Stanislaus, Cal 


12 
30 


30, 580 
79, 400 


72, 640 

83, 600 

1,800 


Madison, Mont 








1,900 




3 

1 

32 


9,600 
5, 700 






j 




160, 630 








Total 


149 


531,675 122 


387, 440 









At the second session of the Fifty-eighth Congress there was intro- 
duced H. R. 6480 (Report No. 1148) "A bill to control grazing in 
forest reserves" as follows: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That every person who knowingly pastures or causes to be 
pastured any live stock upon public lands of the United States situated within a 
forest reserve without first having obtained a permit so to do under rules and regu- 
lations prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior shall, upon conviction, be pun- 
ished by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars, or by imprisonment for not 
longer than one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment. 

The reasons making desirable the passage of this bill were set forth 
in my last annual report, and 1 now again recommend that the Con- 
gress be requested to pass it. 



FIRES IN THE FOREST RESERVES. 

The eleven reserves in Arizona and New Mexico and the San Ber- 
nardino, San Gabriel, Santa Barbara, San Jacinto, and Trabuco Can- 
3 T on in southern California are designated the southern reserves, and 
all others as the northern reserves. One year with another about 6 
per cent of the fires in the southern reserves occur in the first quarter 
of the calendar year, 32 per cent in the second quarter, 48 per cent in 
the third quarter, and 18 per cent in the last quarter. In the northern 
reserves 0.25 per cent of the fires occur in the first quarter, 8 per cent 
in the second quarter, 84 per cent in the third, and 7.75 in the fourth 
quarter. 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904, there were extingushed 
231 fires which had passed the incipient stage when discovered. 
The area burned over before the fires were put out aggregated 
112,817 acres, and the cost of extinguishing them, exclusive of the 
salaries of the forest-reserve employees, was $4,127. This is a 
decrease from the prior year of 48 in this class of fires, a decrease 
in the area burned over of 166,917 acres, and a decrease in the extra 
cost of $2,036. The large decrease in the area burned over is partty 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 43 

accounted for by the fact that a large fire in the Mount Rainier Reserve 
in Washington in September, 1902 (fiscal year, 1903), burned over 
129,018 acres. 

A report by quarters for the calendar year is probably a more satis- 
factory showing than one for the fiscal year. Under the business 
statement of my report will be found a table showing the number of 
fires which had passed the incipient stage when discovered, and the 
area burned over for each reserve b}^ quarters of the calendar year 
1903 and the first half of the year 1904. 

AUTHORITY TO MAKE ARRESTS. 

In regard to the bills heretofore recommended by this Department, 
and successively introduced in the Fifty-sixth, Fifty-seventh, and 
Fifty-eighth Congresses, to confer authority upon forest officers to 
make arrests for violation of the laws and regulations relating to forest 
reserves, it is a matter for serious regret that as yet no legislation has 
been secured on the subject. 

A bill for this purpose was introduced in the House at the last session 
of Congress (H. R. 7296), received favorable action by that body, and 
is now before the Senate. 

The management of the reserves is so hampered by the want of such 
authority that the passage of this bill is greatly desired by this Office. 

FREE USE OF TIMBER. 

The people are rapidly coming to understand the free-use permit 
system in procuring timber needed for individual use of settlers, 
miners, prospectors, and residents, for firewood, fencing, building, 
mining, prospecting, and other domestic purposes, and the number 
who take advantage of the privilege is rapidly increasing. 

There has been some dissatisfaction expressed because of delays in 
securing these permits, but in almost all cases this has been found to 
be the fault of the applicant rather than of the forest officers, due to 
the fact that the applications are not sent in until the timber is wanted, 
and then the stormy season sets in or the harvest time has come on 
before the work can be completed. 

The quarterly reports of the forest officers show 3,265 applications 
submitted, while but 2,221 applications were reported for the preceding 
fiscal year. 

The applications were for the removal of both living and dead tim- 
ber to the amount of 5,764,683 feet B. M. and 53,569 cords. 

The amount of dead timber allowed during the year was in excess 
of the amount of living timber allowed to be taken under the free-use 
provisions of law. Areas of dead timber are allotted to the free-use 
applicants in small tracts, which they are required to clear up 



44 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

thoroughly. This and much green timber wastefully cut in former 
years and now utilized under the free-use s} 7 stem has been removed, 
to the great benefit of the forest reserves. 

SALES OF TIMBER WITHIN FOREST RESERVES. 

Three hundred and seventy petitions for sale of timber from lands 
in the forest reserves have been presented, involving 69,257,710 feet 
of timber B. M. and 87,032 cords of wood. 

One hundred and eighteen petitions were pending before the Office 
at the date of last report. 

Three hundred and seventy-seven sales have been effected and of the 
proceeds of such sales and amounts received on previous sales in which 
there were deferred payments, there has been realized and paid into 
the Treasury $58,436. 19, and a very considerable amount arising from 
such sales is held in the hands of receivers of public moneys at the 
several United States land offices, as unofficial moneys pending approval 
of agreements and other necessary proceedings in several cases. 

Twenty cases have been refused or abandoned by petitioners for vari- 
ous reasons, and 91 petitions are pending necessar} r official action or 
the compliance of petitioners with Department orders relative thereto. 

The timber sought and sold has been largely dead, or, as in the case 
of the Black Hills Forest Reserve, so seriously affected by insects as 
to make its early destruction certain, as well as to seriousl} 7 imperil the 
surrounding timber not so affected, and every effort has been made to 
clear the reserves of dead and insect^infested timber wherever located. 
Ver}' general success has attended such efforts and the use of such 
timber has been accepted by consumers in all cases where it could be 
made available, and while the prices realized for this class of timber 
have not been large, it will be observed that the results show a very 
considerable increase in receipts over any previous year's business. 

Little difficulty has been experienced in inducing economical use of 
timber, and in securing a suitable clearing up of the cut-over areas, so 
indispensable to the future welfare of the reserves, and it may be said 
that the improvement in conditions has been so marked as to be very 
satisfactory. 

SAWMILLS IN FOREST RESERVES. 

The policy of recommending the granting of permits for the instal- 
lation of sawmills in the reserves where the conditions seemed to 
demand such action has been persisted in, and a considerable number 
of such permits have been issued to persons of undoubted character 
and responsibility under such restrictions as appeared to be demanded 
by the conditions. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 45 

The results have justified such action. 

So far as known, not one case has resulted unfortunately, but, on 
the contrary, the practice of locating such mills near the cutting area 
in sale cases has tended to promote a more economical use of timber, 
better facilities for supplying the products to the consumer, and a 
more satisfactory understanding with all concerned. It may be said 
in addition that this practice has resulted in more careful methods in 
the management and control of fires, and has furnished a corps of 
trained assistants in cases where fires have attained proportions 
beyond the control of the forest officers. 

EXPORT OF FOREST RESERVE TIMBER ACROSS THE STATE LINE. 

In my report last year it was pointed out that the requirement in 
the act of June 4, 1897 (30 Stat., 34-36), that all timber procured from 
forest reserves must be used in the State or Territory in which the 
reserve lies needs to be modified. Report to that effect, recommend- 
ing that, while leaving the restriction operative in general, the Secre- 
tary of the Interior be given discretional powers in exceptional cases, 
was made to the Department b}^ this Office on December 28, 1901, 
submitting the draft of a bill which, upon your recommendation, was 
subsequently introduced as H. R. 9202 (Fifty-seventh Congress, first 
session), and was favorably reported upon, with a slight amendment, 
by the Public Lands Committee of the House. As so amended it was 
introduced in the Senate at the next session of Congress, but failed of 
passage. On February 26 last it was again introduced as H. R. 13095 
(Fifty-eighth Congress, second session), but was not acted upon. 

In the reports upon this bill above referred to the importance of its 
passage has been urged upon the ground that the practical operation 
of the forest reserve administration act of June 4, 1897, has clearly 
shown that, while the limitation in question is undoubtedly advisable 
on the whole, yet it has resulted in many instances in working serious 
hardship, especially in cases in which forest reserves contain the nat- 
ural sources of timber supply for persons living on prairie lands across 
the State line. In such cases the effect of the limitation is to deprive 
the people of timber. 

Again, it has been shown that the practical working of this restric- 
tion in the timbered districts of Washington, Oregon, California and 
Idaho results in much of the timber being left to waste, since there is 
not a sufficient demand in the local market in each State to utilize all 
of it. 

The failure to modify this restriction in the manner proposed in the 
bill now before Congress causes such serious embarrassment in 
administering certain of the reserves that it is to be hoped that (he 
bill will be enacted into law at the coming session of Congress. 



46 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

REVENUE FROM SALE OF TIMBER AND OTHER MATERIAL AND RENTING 
OR LEASING LANDS WITHIN FOREST RESERVES. 

Under the present laws the only resources on forest reserves which 
may be utilized by the Government for a money consideration are the 
timber thereon and mineral and other springs; the sale of forest 
reserve timber being provided for in the acts of June 1, 1897 (30 
Stat., 35), and June 6, 1900 (31 Stat., 661), and the leasing of springs 
in forest reserves being authorized by the act of February 28, 1899 
(30 Stat., 908). 

Already the beneficial results from authorizing sales of timber within 
the reserves have full} 7 demonstrated the advisability of such legisla- 
tion, the receipts from sales made in the reserve in which a system of 
timber sales is now well under way (the Black Hills Forest Reserve, 
in South Dakota) having produced, during each of the last three 
years, a revenue in excess of the total outlay for the administration of 
the reserve. 

The use of timber is, however, only one of the privileges which form 
a proper source of revenue in administering the reserves. Of as great 
importance in certain localities is that of grazing. The revenue that 
should be derived from a reasonable charge for grazing within certain 
of the reserves would be in proportion to the magnitude of the great 
wool industry in those localities; and there certainly appears to be no 
good and sufficient reason for allowing that industry use of the herb- 
age within the reserves free of charge while requiring that the lumber 
trade shall pay for its supplies drawn from the same source. 

There are also now numerous sawmills, hotels, road ranches, sum- 
mer resorts, stores, and other establishments within the reserves, all 
of which should pay a small charge each year for the privileges granted 
of so occup\nng and using forest reserve lands. 

Under such management it would not be long before the reserves 
would become more than self-supporting. Yearly appropriations for 
their care would cease to be necessary. It accord ingly appears advis- 
able that Congress should take the proper action to this end at an early 
date. 

In considering legislation on this subject, I deem it well to call atten- 
tion to the fact that so far all money received from forest reserves 
has been paid into the Treasury of the United States, where it ceases 
to be available for reserve work without a special appropriation by 
Congress. 

That a change from this policy is desirable is evident, and was fully 
recognized in the above-mentioned act of February 28, 1899, which 
provides, in the matter of leasing mineral and other springs, as follows: 

That all funds arising from the privileges granted hereunder shall be covered into 
the Treasury of the United States as a special fund to be expended in the care of 
public forest reservations. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 47 

Similar provision should be made in all further legislation of this 
kind. 

In addition, it is desirable that the States and Territories in which 
these reserves are located should have a certain money interest in the 
management of such reserves; and it is believed that this could be 
best accomplished by having a certain portion (25 per cent) of the net 
income from each reserve go to the State or Territory in which it is 
situated. 

This provision would do much, it is believed, to win the good will 
and enlist the co-operation of the people where the reserves are located, 
and thus would aid materially in the administration and care of the 
reserves. The people would have an interest in the protection of the 
timber and range which would greatly assist the field force. 

As meeting all of the desired ends, I wish to invite attention to the 
bill, drafted in this office, which was introduced in the Fift3 r -seventh 
Congress, in both the House and Senate, but failed of action; and 
which was subsequently reintroduced in the last session of Congress 
as H. R. 7295 (Fifty-eighth Congress, second session). 

In view of the importance of this measure I recommend that this 
pending bill receive favorable consideration at the coming session of 
Congress. 

MISCELLANEOUS PRIVILEGES. 

Applications to be allowed the occupancy and use of forest reserve 
lands for various special privileges have exceeded by about two-thirds 
the number filed during the preceding fiscal year, and with four excep- 
tions they pertain to the old forest reserves existing at the date of the 
last annual report. As against the 166 applications then reported as 
having been received and considered, 226 have been filed during the 
past fiscal year. Of these more than one-half have been submitted to 
the Department with recommendation for favorable action in most 
cases. Upon departmental instructions returned, permit has been 
granted on one-half of the applications filed and one-seventh have 
been rejected. 

A large number of the remaining portion of the applications filed 
have been returned to the forest officer for amendment or supple- 
mental report required before they could be properly submitted for 
departmental action. About one-sixth of the applications received 
are awaiting action by this office. 

The applications rejected have been mainly those seeking fencing 
privileges prohibited b}^ the statute, or applications for irrigation and 
telephone right of way- erroneously submitted under the law applicable 
in the cases. In the latter class the rejection was, therefore, not an 
actual denial of the privilege sought, but a notice to the applicants of 
the statutory requirements in procuring the desired franchise. 



48 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



The rejected applications also embrace requests made for permission 
to conduct road houses for which there was no real or great demand 
from the traveling' public, and to establish road houses, hotels,, and 
stores with saloons, which latter feature is disallowed in the interests 
of proper forest reserve administration. No applications have been 
refused wherein the privilege sought was deemed essential to the 
development of legitimate mining enterprises, or to the well-being of 
the settler and home maker, and at the same time shown not to be 
detrimental to forest reserve interests. 

SELECTIONS IN LIEU OF LANDS WITHIN FOREST RESERVES. 

The following tables exhibit the progress of the work during the 
year ended June 30, 1904, in the adjustment of selections made in 
lieu of patented lands and unperfected claims within forest reserves, 
under acts of June 4, 1897 (30 Stat. , 36), and June 6, 1900 (31 Stat., 614): 

PERFECTED CASES. 



Items. 



Pending June 30, 1903 

Received during year ended June 



Approved for patent during year ended June 30, 1904 
Rejected during the year ended June 30, 1904 



Total pending June 30, 1904. 



Approved by Commissioner, but not for patent (unsur- 
veyed) 

Hearings ordered in 

To Secretary on appeal 

Cases suspended under various orders, or awaiting addi- 
tional proof called for 

On which no action has been taken 



Cases. 



2,910 
134 



204 
29 
92 

2,841 
2,450 



Total 
cases. 



5,404 
3, 256 



,660 



8, 044 



5,616 



5,616 



578, 793. 20 
23, 040. 10 



784, 856. 17 
343,171.26 



Total areas. 



1, 263, 236. 93 
466, 623. 80 



1,729,860.73 
""66i"833."36 



1,128,027.43 



1,128,027.43 



Acres. 

Average acreage of selections approved for patent 195. 46 

Average acreage of selections rejected 171. 90 

UNPERFECTED CASES. 



Items. 


Cases. 


Total 

cases. 


Areas. 


Total areas. 






35 

'"io" 




5, 752. 02 




3 

7 


480. 00 
1, 123. 76 




Rejected up to June 30, 1903 


1, 603, 76 




Pending June 30, 1903 




25 
11 




4, 148. 26 








1, 711. 82 










Approved for patent during year ended June 30, 1904 


11 
5 


36 

""ie" 


1, 769. 00 
800. 00 


5, 860. 08 


2, 569. 00 










20 




3, 291. 08 




3 

17 


20 


440. 00 
2,851.08 




Cases suspended awaiting additional evidence called for, 
reports from forest officers and determination of hearings 
ordered 


3, 291. 08 















REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 49 
MISCELLANEOUS CASES AND APPEALS. 

In connection with such selections there have been received, dock- 
eted, and acted upon, mainly during the year ended June 30, 1904, 
appeals, contested, and miscellaneous cases as follows: 

Cases. 

Received and docketed 538 

Acted upon and finally closed 314 

Acted upon but not yet closed 49 

Awaiting action 175 

538 

The work on these selections, appeals, etc., during the year involved 
the preparation and dispatch of 19,999 letters and decisions covering 
31,565 pages. 

All selections received at this Office prior to November 1, 1903, 
except only cases held under orders of suspension, have been exam- 
ined and either approved or rejected, or are awaiting receipt of addi- 
tional evidence called for. 

The following tables present a general summary of all selections 
received under said acts, in lieu of both patented lands and unper- 
fected claims, up to June 30, 1904, with the acreage of land selected 
and the action had thereon : 

PERFECTED CASES. 





Cases. 


Total 

cases. 


Areas. 


Total areas. 






10,853 
"*5*237" 




2, 287, 746. 92 


Patented 


4,502 
735 


1,028,363.36 
131,356.13 


Rejected 


1,159,719.49 








5,616 


1, 159, 719. 49 


1,128,027.43 







UNPERFECTED CASES. 



Cases. 



Total 
cases. 



Areas. 



Total areas. 



Received 

Approved for patent . 
Rejected 



26 



2, 249. 00 
1,923.76 



Cases pending 



20 



7,463.84 



4, 172. 76 



3,291.08 



PRESERVATION OF GAME AND FISH. 



In my last report I recommended that the attention of Congress be 
called to the need for a Federal statute that would tend to harmonize 
State legislation upon the subject of protection of game and fish within 
the several Federal forest reserves, without creating a divided juris- 
diction over such reserves, and which would not encroach upon the 
proprietary rights of the States to control the game and fish within 
their respective boundaries. 
8970—04 4 



50 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

The bill (H. R. 8135) subsequently introduced in Congress for the 
protection of game and fish in the forest reserves of the United States 
is in line with this suggestion. It is, accordingly, to be hoped that it 
will be enacted into law at the next session of Congress. 

TRANSFER OF FOREST RESERVES TO THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

I desire to renew the recommendation heretofore made by this office 
that the work connected with the administration of forest reserves 
he transferred to the Bureau of Forestry, in the Department of 
Agriculture. 

The advisability of this action becomes more apparent as the work 
of administering the reserves progresses, as development of the 
service is clearly retarded by the present distribution of the work 
among different bureaus in two Departments. It is plainty not prac- 
ticable to attain the best results under such conditions. If the appli- 
cation of scientific methods to the numerous forest problems arising 
in connection with the various industries affected by the reserves is to 
be properly undertaken and carried forward, it is essential to consoli- 
date all the features of the work in one bureau, equipped with officers 
who have had the special scientific and practical training needed for 
the work. 

With the intent of devising a scientific system of forestry adapted 
to meet the peculiar needs of this country, the Government has set 
apart considerably over fifty millions of acres of land for that purpose, 
and is now confronted with the task of working out the many prob- 
lems involved in establishing such a system. The work is proving to 
he one o>f great magnitude, such industries as agriculture, grazing, 
minings lumbering, transportation, manufactures, and commerce, in 
general, having a most intimate and dependent relation to it, as has 
been pointed out by President Roosevelt, in connection with express- 
ing the opinion that "The forest problem is in many ways the most 
vital internal problem of the United States." 

Plainly, work recognized as involving interests of such magnitude 
should be intrusted to a branch of the Government which can com- 
mand the expert talent needed to cope with the intricacies and diffi- 
culties of the problems involved. 

It is needless to state that the General Land Office is neither organ- 
ized nor equipped for such work. The utmost that can be done in this 
office beyond handling matters pertaining to titles to the lands is to 
conduct the work incident to the establishment and policing of the 
reserves, and to regulate their occupancy and use, to a limited degree, 
along practical lines. The application of scientific methods in the 
development of a system of national forestry is altogether outside of 
and beyond its scope. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 51 

I, therefore, most earnestly desire to see this work placed by Con- 
gress in the charge of a scientific branch of the Government, in which 
it can be expanded properly along the lines essential to its success. 

Public Lands Commission. 

Under date of October 22, 1903, the President appointed a Commis- 
sion on the Public Lands to report to him upon the condition, opera- 
tion, and effect of the present land laws, and the use, condition, and 
disposal of the public lands. This commission consists of W. A. Rich- 
ards, chairman, F. H. Newell, and Glitford Pinchot. The commission 
was authorized and directed by the President to avail itself of all 
means of information in the Executive Departments, and, especially, 
in the General and local land offices, the reclamation service, and the 
Bureau of Forestry. The commission was directed to report either in 
whole or in part as early as the importance and extent of the questions 
to be considered would permit, and in any event not later than Decem- 
ber 1, 1904. 

The commission has held numerous meetings in this city and a num- 
ber of clerks and special agents from the General Land Office have 
been and are now engaged in making investigations in the field and 
compiling statistics for the use of the commission. In several cities in 
the public land States public meetings for .the purpose of discussing 
the operation of the land laws have been participated in by the com- 
mission. On March 7, 1901, a partial report of the commission was 
made to the President and by him submitted to Congress, where it is 
now under consideration. A cop}^ of this report is herewith submitted. 

Partial Report of the Public Lands Commission. 

Washington, D. C. , March 7, 1904. 
Sir: This Commission, appointed October 22, 1903, to report to you upon the con- 
dition, operation, and effect of the present land laws, and to recommend such changes 
as are needed to effect the largest practicable disposition of the public lands to actual 
settlers who will build permanent homes upon them, and to secure in permanence 
the fullest and most effective use of the resources of the public lands, respectfully 
submits the following partial report: 

meetings of commission. 

During the month of December, 1903, the Commission sat in the office of the Com- 
missioner of the General Land Office to receive recommendations and hear the argu- 
ments of all who might appear before it. Notice of these sittings was published 
through the press and special invitations to be present were extended to the public 
lands committees of the Congress. Senators and Representatives and others appeared 
before the Commission. 

In January, 1904, Messrs. Pinchot and Newell, of the Commission, attended the 
meetings of the National Livestock Association and of the National Woolgrowers' 
Association in Portland, Oreg., and participated in the sessions of those associations. 
Returning, they also visited Sacramento, Cal.; Reno, Nev.; Salt Lake City, Utah; 



52 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Denver, Colo.; Cheyenne, Wyo., and conferred with governors, State land boards,, 
public officials, and citizens generally, and discussed the questions under consider- 
ation by the Commission. Upon the return of Messrs. Pinchot and Newell to- 
Washington the meetings of the Commission were resumed. 

MAGNITUDE OF PROBLEM. 

In approaching the question of attaining the largest practicable disposition of the 
public lands to actual settlers, and the equally important question of securing the 
most effective use of these lands, we appreciate that extremely difficult and far- 
reaching problems are involved. The public lands embrace in area very nearly one- 
third of the entire extent of the United States and are widely scattered, extending 
from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific and from Canada to Mexico, including every 
variety of topography and climate. Excluding Alaska there are 23 States and 3 
Territories containing public land. This includes approximately from 5 to 95 per 
cent of the area of these States. 

Often in any one State the conditions are so diverse that the man who argues for 
certain points is usually found to base his argument upon conditions which exist in 
his locality. If not limited by geographical environment the view point is almost 
always that of a special industry, such as sheep or cattle raising, irrigation, etc., and 
the arguments are based upon a knowledge of conditions which affect that industry. 
It is this condition which has led to the presentation before the Commission of irrec- 
oncilable statements of existing conditions, and the divergence of opinion as to the 
remedies to be adopted. Certain able men insist that the public land laws are suffi- 
cient, and that however the lands are disposed of they will ultimately be put to the 
best use. 

Others go to the other extreme and assert that nearly all of the public land laws 
should be repealed or modified, that they are incompatible with good administration, 
and that the lands now being disposed of are held in such a way that they will never 
furnish homes to people who might otherwise enjoy their use. 

Between these two extremes there is a broad middle ground, occupied by the 
majority of persons who have carefully considered the subject and who agree that 
changes should be made and that the land laws should be simplified and codified. 

ANTIQUATED LAND LAWS. 

The information obtained by the Commission through the conferences in the West 
and the hearings in Washington discloses a prevailing opinion that the present land 
laws do not fit the conditions of the remaining public lands. Most of these laws and 
the departmental practices which have grown up under them were framed to suit 
the lands of the humid region. The public lands w T hich now remain are chiefly arid 
in character. Hence these laws and practices are no longer well suited for the most 
economical and effective disposal of lands to actual settlers. 

The States and Territories where lies the greater part of the public domain are pro- 
gressing rapidly in population and wealth, but not in proportion to the disposal of 
land. In spite of this fact and of the recognition that the land laws might be 
improved, there is a general fear of change and a wide demand that the present laws 
be allowed to stand. This is due to dread of the introduction of unfamiliar require- 
ments and to the fear that new enactments may recognize physical conditions even 
less than the present ones, and may be even less suited to the needs of the country. 
By the use of practices sanctioned by custom, the people have heretofore been able 
to get along fairly well ; any change in their minds is associated with more difficult 
requirements, and they dread innovations which may hinder rather than help 
home making. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 53 

The changes suggested at this time have principal bearing upon the control, use, 
and disposal of the forest lands, as these are among the most valuable of the lands 
remaining in public ownership. The repeal of the timber and stone act will unques- 
tionably cure the most obvious defect in the administration of the public lands. 
Next in importance to this is the desert-land law. The Commission is not at pres- 
ent prepared to suggest radical changes in this law, but we believe that the change 
recommended hereafter in this report, together with a more careful enforcement of 
the law itself, and especially of those provisions which relate to the adequacy of the 
permanent w r ater supply, will suffice to insure good results. 

TIMBER AND STONE ACT. 

Under the act of June 3, 1878, generally known as the timber and stone act, there 
has lately been an unusual increase in the number of entries, which can not be 
accounted for by an increase in the demands of commerce or by any unusual settle- 
ment of the localities in which the greater part of the entries were made. In 1902 
there were 4,022 entries under this act, aggregating 545,253 acres, while in 1903 there 
were 12,249 such entries, aggregating 1,765,222 acres. A very large proportion of 
these entries were upon timbered land. The law was enacted to meet the demands 
of settlers, miners, and others for timber and stone for building, mining, and other 
purposes. There is much evidence, however, going to show that many entries have 
been made for purposes not contemplated by the Congress. 

Under this law no residence upon nor cultivation of the tract entered is required. 
An application is made at the local land office in the district in which the land is 
situated to purchase 160 acres, or less, of land which it is alleged is chiefly valuable 
for the timber or stone, as the case may be, which it contains. Advertisement is 
made for sixty days, naming a date upon which evidence will be offered before the 
local land officers to prove the character of the land. Upon the day named such 
proof is offered, and, if deemed sufficient and there being no protest nor allegation 
of fraud or collusion, payment at the rate of $2.50 per acre is made and final receipt 
is issued. This practically concludes the transaction, the issuing of the patent fol- 
lowing in due course of time. 

The only grounds upon which the entry by a qualified entryman would be refused 
are either that the land is not chiefly valuable for timber or stone, or that entry is 
not being made for the sole use and benefit of the entryman, but for speculative pur- 
poses. As the entries under this act are generally made for the timber which the 
land contains, proof is seldom lacking that the land is chiefly valuable for timber. 
It is very difficult to prove collusion or that the entry was made for speculative pur- 
poses, although it is apparent that many such entries have been made. 

In the case of United States v. Budd(144 U. S., 154), in a decision made in March, 
1892, the United States Supreme Court said (syllabus quoted): 

"(1) That all the act of June 3, 1878, denounces is a prior agreement by which the 
patentee acts for another in the purchase. 

"(2) That M. might rightfully go or send into that vicinity (the vicinity of the 
land) and make known generally to individuals a willingness to buy timber land at 
a price in excess of that which it would cost to obtain it from the Government, and 
that a person knowing of that offer might rightfully go to the land office and pur- 
chase a timber lot from the Government and transfer it to M. for the stated excess 
without violating the act of June 3, 1878." 

The Commission believes that Congress did not intend that this law should be used 
for the acquisition of large tracts of valuable timber land by individuals or corpora- 
tions, but it has been used for such purposes. Carefulness and vigilance in its admin- 
istration can not prevent its being so used. A great number of such entries were 
recently suspended, but the most rigid investigation failed to show that any consider- 



54 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

able proportion of them had been made in violation of the law, and the suspensions 
were removed. The fact remains, however, that many of these entries were made 
by nonresidents of the State in which the land is situated, who could not use the 
land nor the timber upon it themselves, and it is apparent that they were made for 
speculative purposes, and will eventually follow the course taken by many previous 
similar entries and become part of some large timber holding. 

While this law is adapted to and chiefly used for the acquisition of timber land, 
many entries have been made under it where it was alleged that the land is chiefly 
valuable for stone. There is no doubt that the land in a very large proportion of 
such entries was not desired on account of the stone which it contained, but for the 
purpose of obtaining control of water or to add to other holdings. There are, more- 
over, other laws under which land containing stone may be entered. 

Our conclusion is that the law is defective, because even when properly adminis- 
tered it may be used for purposes for which it was never intended, and we recom- 
mend its repeal. 

If the timber and stone act is repealed some legislative enactment will be necessary 
providing for acquiring timber upon the public lands. The manner in which timber 
upon Indian lands has recently been disposed of suggests a plan for the disposition 
of this timber upon the public lands. The timber is advertised and sold to the 
, highest bidder, with the result that the market price has been obtained. 

In December, 1903, there were two sales of timber upon the ceded portion of the 
Chippewa Indian Reservation in Minnesota. At the first sale, on December 5, the 
timber upon 103,027 acres sold for $1,432,771, an average price of $13.90 per acre. 
At the second sale, on December 28, 95 per cent of the timber upon 72,856 acres sold 
for $1,218,132, an average price of $16.70 per acre. The amounts to be received from 
the various purchases are calculated upon the estimated amount of timber upon the 
land at a stated price per thousand feet, board measure, but the payments will be 
based upon an actual scale of the logs when cut. Logging operations now in progress 
indicate that more than the estimated amount of timber will be cut from these lands. 
It will be observed that but 95 per cent of the timber was sold at the last sale, the 
remaining 5 per cent being reserved for reforestation. 

The average price per acre of both sales is $15.06, and the land is retained for sub- 
sequent disposition. Had this land been disposed of under the timber and stone act 
the price would have been $2.50 per acre for both land and timber. Under these 
sales the timber on 175,883 acres sold for $2,650,903, and the Government still owns 
the land. If this land had been disposed of under the timber and stone act the 
Government would have received for both land and timber the sum of $438,707, a 
difference of $2,211,196. 

Some means should be provided by which the matured timber upon the unre- 
served public lands may be sold, not only for the use of individuals, but also to supply 
the demands of commerce. There is now a provision of law for the free use of timber 
in limited quantities for domestic and mining purposes which meets the requirements 
of those needing small quantities, but there is no provision for the sale of timber 
except from forest reserves. 

RECOMMENDATION OF SALE OF TIMBER. 

We recommend the enactment of a law under which it shall be lawful for the Sec- 
retary of the Interior to sell to the highest bidder, at public outcry or otherwise, 
under such rules and regulations and subject to such conditions and restrictions and 
in such quantities as he may prescribe, the right to cut and remove, within such 
period of time as he may fix, any timber from any unappropriated, nonmineral, sur- 
veyed public lands, after first having had such timber duly appraised, and after giving 
public notice of the time, terms, manner, and place of such sale; that he shall have 
power and authority to reject any and all bids offered at any such sale, and that it 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 55 

shall be unlawful for any purchaser at such sale to sell, transfer, assign, or in any 
manner alienate the rights secured by him under this act, except as authorized by 
said Secretary; that the act entitled "An act for the sale of timber lands in the States 
of California, Oregon, Nevada, and Washington Territory," approved June 3, 1878, 
and all acts amendatory thereof be repealed, and that no lands valuable chiefly for 
timber shall hereafter be patented under the commutation provisions of the home- 
stead laws; that any person who violates any of these provisions, or any regulation 
or requirement prescribed pursuant thereto, shall forfeit to the United States ail 
benefits conferred, and all moneys paid by him, and that any right to cut and 
remove timber which he may then hold shall be canceled and revoked. 

COMMUTATION CLAUSE OF THE HOMESTEAD ACT. 

Much evidence has been submitted tending to show that in the prairie States, 
where it has been most used, the commutation clause of the homestead act has been 
of advantage to the settler without causing serious loss to the Government. On the 
contrary, the Government has been pecuniarily benefited by it, because under this 
act the land is paid for in cash after fourteen months' residence, while without com- 
mutation the entryman would receive a patent after five years' residence without 
paying for the land. It is no doubt true that the great majority of commutations 
are made in order to get a title to the land upon which money could be borrowed 
for its improvement. 

There have been abuses of this law as of other land laws, but principally in con- 
nection with entries made upon timber lands. It has furnished a convenient means 
by wdiich an individual could obtain title to 160 acres of valuable timber land which 
could be readily sold for more than it had cost. In this way large holdings have 
been acquired. 

The timbered areas of the public lands of to-day are generally in mountainouf 
regions, and are not susceptible of a high state of cultivation after being cleared of 
timber. Entries of such land are seldom made for farming purposes, but if it is 
desired to do so the settler is permitted, under the law and regulations, to sell any 
surplus timber upon his claim, the proceeds of which can be used in its improve- 
ment. This is a source of revenue available immediately after entry and one which 
is not enjoyed by the settler upon prairie land. 

Our investigations respecting the operations of the commutation clause are still in 
progress, and we are not prepared at this time to recommend its repeal. We are, 
however, satisfied that no serious hardship will be imposed upon the actual settler 
by prohibiting the patenting, under its provisions, of lands chiefly valuable for 
timber. 

DESERT-LAND LAW. 

The Commission is of the opinion that the desert-land law should, for the present 
at least, be allowed to stand, with a few changes in detail. With the experience of 
the past for guidance it is possible to enforce this law so that its essential provisions 
shall be complied with. When this is done it is evident that the entryman will have 
earned a patent at an expense too great for speculative purposes. 

The number of entries is not so large as to preclude actual inspection of each by an 
agent of the Government before final proof is accepted, and the required expendi- 
tures for reclamation are of such a character as to be easily ascertained. Km 
attention should be directed to the proof that an adequate and permanent water 
supply has been provided. 

There is one defect in this act which should be remedied at once. The act of 
March 3, 1891 (26 Stat., 1095), permits the assignment of entries, and to invalidate 
an entry the illegal intent must assume some tangible form prior to entry. The 
mere fact that a contract to sell is made after the entry, or any other arrangement 



56 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

whereby the lands are held for some other person, does not warrant cancellation. 
This feature of the law is the chief objection that might be urged against it. 

The right to assign an entry is not in harmony with the fundamental principle 
underlying the public-land laws that entries should be made for the exclusive bene- 
fit of the entryman and not for the benefit of any other person, and its existence 
practically abrogates the restriction of the act limiting one person to one entry in a 
compact form, the only actual limitation being to 320 acres, which might embrace a 
number of noncontiguous tracts taken by assignment. 

The interest of the Government and of the actual settler will be protected and 
promoted by a repeal of so much of the act of March 3, 1891, as permits the assign- 
ment of desert-land entries. 

AGRICULTURAL LAND IN FOREST RESERVES. 

However carefully the boundaries of forest reserves may be selected, it is practi- 
cally inevitable that more or less agricultural land should be included. Such land 
usually lies in the narrow valleys of the rivers. Its occupation for agricultural pur- 
poses is in the interest of the region in which it lies and of the settlers who would 
make homes upon it. The presence of the latter in the reserves w T ould, under wise 
laws, operate distinctly for the protection and general advantage of the reserves. It 
is essential to the prosperity of the public-land States both that the forest reserves 
should be maintained and that all of the land within their borders should be put to 
its best use. To exclude all agricultural lands by Presidential proclamation is not 
feasible because of their small area, scattered location, and irregular boundaries. 
Therefore we recommend that such lands be opened to agricultural entry in the fol- 
lowing way: 

That the Secretary having supervision of forest reserves may, upon application or 
otherwise, ascertain, list, and describe, by metes and bounds or otherwise, lands 
within such reserves which are chiefly valuable for agriculture, and that the lands so 
listed may, at the expiration of ninety days from the filing of such lists in the land 
office of the land district in which they are situated, be disposed of to actual settlers 
under the homestead laws only, in tracts not exceeding 160 acres in area and not 
exceeding 1J miles in length; that when such lands are ascertained and listed upon 
the application of any person qualified to make homestead entry, such applicant may 
settle upon and enter such lands thirty days after the date of such filing; that no 
person settling upon, entering, or occupying such lands shall thereby have a right to 
use any other lands within such reserve for grazing or other purposes; that any entry- 
man desiring to obtain patent to any lands, described by metes and bounds, entered 
by him under the provisions of this act, may do so by filing, with the required proof 
of residence and cultivation, a plat and field notes of the lands entered, made by or 
under the direction of the United States surveyor-general, showing accurately the 
boundaries of such lands, which shall be distinctly marked by monuments on the 
ground, and shall post a copy of such plat, together with a notice of the time and 
place of offering proof, in a conspicuous place on the land embraced in such plat 
during the period prescribed for the publication of his notice of intention to offer 
proof, and that a copy of such plat and field notes shall also be kept posted in the 
office of the register of the land office for the land district in which such lands are 
situated for a like period; and further, that any agricultural lands within forest 
reserves may, at the discretion of the Secretary, be surveyed by metes and bounds 
but that no lands entered under these provisions shall be patented under the com- 
mutation provisions of the homestead laws or be exchanged for other public lands. 

To open the reserves to homestead entry without restriction would be in effect to 
abolish them. We therefore recommend that the agricultural character of the lands 
should be officially ascertained, as has been the habit hitherto in the case of agricul- 
tural and mineral lands. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 57 

The effect of the foregoing provisions is to give an intending settler the right to 
■apply for the particular agricultural land he wants and sixty days' preference in 
•entering it. Through survey by metes and bounds the settler is enabled to take the 
full amount of 160 acres of actual agricultural land. The principal danger in the 
administration of this plan is likely to arise from the desire of others than actual set- 
tlers to get possession of valuable timber lands on the plea that they are agricultural 
in character, to cut the timber from the lands, and then abandon them, to the serious 
injury of the interests which the reserves are created to serve. 

Such an abuse would be greatly facilitated by the commutation clause of the home- 
stead act, whereas actual settlers on agricultural lands in forest reserves would sel- 
dom or never suffer hardship from the requirement of five years' residence. Agri- 
cultural lands in forest reserves are not wholly on the same plane as such lands 
outside, because their use must be subservient to the purposes for which the reserves 
were created. Their actual occupation by permanent settlers is of the first import- 
ance to this object, and shifting of ownership during the first years of settlement and 
development would be of serious injury to the reserves. We are of the opinion that 
to allow the application of the commutation clause of the homestead act to lands in 
the forest reserves would tend to defeat the object of the opening of these lands to 
agricultural entry and would embarrass the administration of the reserves. 

LANDS RELEASED FROM TEMPORARY WITHDRAWAL. 

In making forest reserves it is usually necessary to withdraw temporarily, pending 
•segregation, considerable areas of land which are known to contain forest growth. 
These temporary withdrawals are made usually of areas larger than will ultimately 
be proclaimed as forest reserves, in order to enable the officers of the Government to 
ascertain what are the existing conditions and to draw the boundaries with care and 
without interference growing out of speculative entries or selections made not for 
settlement, but to secure certain advantages which may grow out of the creation of 
the forest reserve. For this reason temporary withdrawals are essential for the care- 
ful delimiting of the forest reserve. When the limits of a forest reserve are deter- 
mined upon, the excluded lands are restored to entry and settlement. 

Experience has shown that speculative entries or large filings of so-called scrip are 
frequently made upon such excluded land, to the detriment of actual settlers. 
Therefore provisions should be made to give, actual settlers ample time in which to 
exercise their rights. Accordingly, the Commission recommends that in the event 
of the modification or revocation of any order temporarily withdrawing lands from 
settlement and entry resulting in the release of such lands from such withdrawal, or 
in the event of the exclusion or release of lands from any forest reserve established 
by the President, under section 24 of the act approved March 3, 1891, entitled "An act 
to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," the nonmineral public lands 
so released from a forest reserve, and not otherwise appropriated or reserved, shall 
become subject to settlement from the date of the order or proclamation so releasing 
or excluding them, but shall not become subject to entry, filing, or selection under any 
law providing for the disposal of nonmineral public lands until after sixty days' n< >tice 
by such publication as the Secretary of the Interior may prescribe, nor shall they 
become subject to entry, filing, or selection under any law except the homestead 
laws until ninety days after said notice. 

The Commission will continue its investigations and make further report. 

Respectfullv submitted. 

W. A. Richards. 

F. II. Newell. 

GlPFORD PlNCHOT. 

The President. 



58 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

National Parks, 
proposed petrified forest national park, arizona. 

The bill, which was passed by the House of Representatives in both 
the Fifty-sixth and Fifty-seventh Congresses, for the protection 
of the region containing what is known as the Petrified Forest, in 
the Territory of Arizona, was reintroduced in the first session of the 
Fifty- eighth Congress as H. R. 2529, and was again passed by the 
House with certain amendments. 

In view of the well-known importance of securing efficient protec- 
tion for the natural wonders of this region, 1 hope that this bill, which, 
as shown, has already been passed by the House of Representatives 
in no less than three successive Congresses, may not fail to receive 
favorable action by the Senate at its approaching session. 

PROPOSED PAJARITO CLIFF DWELLERS' NATIONAL PARK, NEW MEXICO. 

In reference to the matter of pending legislation to establish the 
proposed Pajarito Cliff Dwellers' National Park, in the Territory of 
New Mexico, containing extensive cliff dwellers' ruins, this office, on 
February 25, 1904, transmitted to the Department a copy of a report, 
received through the Department of Agriculture, by Mr. S. J. 
Holsinger, of the Bureau of Forestry, in that Department, submitting 
the result of a recently made investigation of the region; from which 
it appeared that a national park established with boundaries as pro- 
posed in the bill pending in Congress, viz, H. R. 7209 (Fifty-eighth 
Congress, Second session), slightly amended, would include the most 
important of the ruins, without in any manner conflicting with other 
interests, public or private. 

In view of this showing of facts, it was suggested that the cop} r of 
Mr. Holsinger's report upon the matter be transmitted to Congress, 
with the recommendation that the pending bill, viz, H. R. 7269, be 
amended as suggested by Mr. Holsinger. 

As the bill is still pending, I desire to renew this recommendation, 
and respectfully urge that, as so amended, it be passed at the coming 
session of Congress. 

PROPOSED MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK, COLORADO. 

It is of record in this Office that the finest specimens of true cliff 
dwellings in this country are to be found in the Mesa Verde region, 
in the extreme southwestern corner of the State of Colorado. This 
region has the distinction of containing w 7 hat is known as u Cliff Pal- 
ace," which is considered one of the most famous works of prehistoric 
man in existence. 

A bill to establish a national park containing a portion of these valu- 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 59* 

able ruins was introduced in the Fifty-sixth Congress, second session, 
as H. R. 14262; which has since been reintroduced as H. R. 6270 and 
S. 7461 (Fifty-seventh Congress, first session), and H. R. 6784 (Fifty- 
eighth Congress, second session). This latter bill is still pending. 

On February 25, 1904, this Office made report thereon to the Depart- 
ment, and submitted a draft of a new bill and recommended that the 
same be introduced in Congress as a substitute for said bill H. R. 6784. 

In view of the undoubted importance of preserving objects of such 
interest to science as are known to exist in this region, I renew the 
recommendation made in said report from this Office of February 
25 last. 

As this is onty one of numerous tracts containing ruins of former 
cliff dwellings, 1 respectfully suggest that in introducing this new 
bill the name of the proposed park be changed from the "Colorado 
Cliff* Dwellings National Park," which lacks sufficient definiteness, to 
the u Mesa Verde National Park," which would specifically indicate, 
under a w T ell-known local designation, the particular locality set apart. 

ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIONAL PARKS. 

This Office has repeatedly drawn attention to the need for action on 
the part of Congress in respect to making provision for the proper 
care of those portions of the public lands which, for their scenic 
beauty, natural wonders or curiosities, ancient ruins or relics, or other 
objects of scientific or historic interest, or springs of medicinal or 
other properties, it is desirable to protect and utilize in the interest of 
the public. 

The policy of the Government in reserving from appropriation of all 
kind and setting apart, in the interest of science and for the benefit of 
the public at large, regions containing objects of such general interest 
as the Yellowstone, Yosemite, Sequoia, Crater Lake, and other 
national parks, should undoubtedly be extended to include other 
world wonders discovered within the limits of the public domain. 
The mention of such wonders as the Grand Canyon and the Petrified 
Forest in Arizona, the Big Trees in California, the recently discovered 
Natural Bridges in Utah, and also the interesting ruins of prehis- 
toric races scattered throughout portions of the southwest, is suffi- 
cient argument in favor of such action. 

It is clearly the duty of the Government to protect these objects 
from appropriation under the various public land laws, and also to 
preserve them from spoliation and injury of all kinds. Upon this 
point there appears to be no room for doubt. The only question at 
this time is as to the course to be pursued in doing so. Heretofore it 
has been the policy of the Government to make each cum 1 the subject 
of a special act of Congress. 



'60 EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

This course, however, has proved to be far from satisfactory, owing 
to the manifold delays to which measures of this nature are subject. 
The failure to secure legislation, though urgently pressed in successive 
sessions of Congress, to protect such localities as the Petrified Forest 
in Arizona and the Pajarito and Mesa Verde Cliff Dwellers' regions in 
New Mexico and Colorado has sufficiently proved the futility of 
attempting to accomplish, by means of a special act of Congress in 
each instance, the protection of all the localities throughout the public 
domain requiring such action. 

The number of such cases now known to this office makes it evident 
that the time has come for some general enactment on the subject 
which shall enable action to be taken promptly, in each instance, as 
the cases arise from time to time. 

This, it seems, can best be done by Congress empowering the Presi- 
dent to set apart, as national parks, all tracts of public land which, 
for any of the reasons above stated, it is desirable to protect. A bill 
to this end has been urged by this office for some years. As drafted 
and laid before the Department on March 29, 1900, it was introduced 
in the Fifty-sixth Congress and subsequently reintroduced at the last 
session of Congress as House bill 13478, but as yet it has received no 
action. 

Recently the great necessity which exists for this Department to be 
placed in a position to provide proper care and service for portions of 
the public domain containing objects of interest to scientists, has been 
f orcibly brought to ni3 r attention by the receipt of documents, prepared 
by Prof. Edgar L. Hewett, formerly president of the New Mexico 
Normal University, at Las Vegas, N. Mex., presenting a comprehen- 
sive and detailed statement regarding the prehistoric ruins in Arizona, 
New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah, and urging immediate and effective 
measures on the part of the Government for their preservation. 

These papers contain so much valuable information of a specific 
nature regarding the distribution and great seats of culture of the pre- 
historic tribes of the Southwest, with such admirable suggestions 
respecting required action for the preservation and utilization of the 
ruins, that I have appended the same in full to this report. (See 
Appendix.) 

The information furnished in these documents leaves no room to 
doubt that immediate measures should be taken to preserve these inter- 
esting ruins. I have, accordingly, included in my annual estimates for 
this office, a recommendation for an appropriation of not less than 
$10,000 for their care and custody. 

In addition to such action, Professor Hewett clearly sets forth the 
need for general legislation authorizing the setting apart, as national 
parks, such of these regions as are of leading importance, and pro- 
viding for their proper exploration. 



KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 61 

In doing so he advocates the passage, with certain amendments, of 
the above-mentioned Department bill, viz, H. R. 13478 (Fifty-eighth 
Congress, second session), in regard to which he states as follows: 

I should favor, and I believe the scientists and the country at large will favor, a 
simple measure authorizing the creation of national parks, as mentioned above, the 
creation of the small reservations for the protection of the few isolated ruins, or 
small groups of ruins, that demand permanent protection, and the establishment of 
a system of supervision of all ruins on the public domain and Indian reservations by 
the Department of the Interior, all details of which should be left in the hands of the 
Secretary of the Interior to develop, as information and experience direct. It seems 
to me that one section added to H. R. 13478, known as the Lacey Bill, providing for 
the protection and utilization of ruins not included in such national parks as may be 
created under that act, w r ould make it perfectly adequate to cover every condition 
expressed above, and entirely satisfactory to all concerned. 

I concur in Professor Hewett's suggestion, and accordingly recom- 
mend that the bill be amended to meet his views, as follows: 

A BILL to establish and administer national parks, and for other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That the President of the United States may, from time to 
time, set apart and reserve tracts of public land, which, for their scenic beauty, nat- 
ural wonders or curiosities, ancient ruins or relics, or other objects of scientific or 
historic interest, or springs of medicinal or other properties, it is desirable to protect 
and utilize in the interest of the public; and the President shall, by public proclama- 
tion, declare the establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof. 

Sec. 2. That such reservations shall be known as national parks, and shall be under 
the exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior, who is hereby empowered to 
prescribe such rules and regulations and establish such service as he shall deem 
necessary for the care and management of the same. Such regulations shall provide 
specially for the preservation from injury or spoliation of any and all objects therein 
of interest or value to science or history. 

Sec. 3. That the Secretary of the Interior be, and is hereby, authorized to per- 
mit examinations, excavations, and the gathering of objects of interest within such 
parks by any person or persons whom he may deem properly qualified to conduct 
such examinations, excavations, or gatherings, subject to such rules and regulations 
as he may prescribe: Provided, That the examinations, excavations, and gatherings 
are undertaken for the benefit of the Smithsonian Institution, or of some reputable 
museum, university, college, or other recognized scientific or educational institution, 
with a view to increasing the knowledge of such objects. 

Sec 4. That the Secretary of the Interior be, and is hereby, authorized, in the 
exercise of his discretion, to rent or lease, under rules and regulations to be made by 
him, pieces or parcels of ground within such parks for the erection of such buildings 
as may be required for the accommodation of visitors. 

Sec. 5. That all funds arising from the privileges granted hereunder shall be cov- 
ered into the Treasury of the United States as a special fund to be expended in the 
care of such parks. 

Sec 6. That all natural wonders or curiosities, ancient ruins or relics, or other 
objects of scientific or historic interest, or springs of medicinal or other properties, 
on such of the public lands as are not set apart as national parks, under the provi- 
sions of this act, are hereby declared to be under the care and custody of the Secre- 
tary of the Interior, whose duty it shall be to protect and preserve the same from 
unauthorized in j Cry or waste, in any form whatsoever, so long as shall be necessary 



62 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

in the interest of the furtherance of knowledge of any of such objects, or for the 
utilization thereof, and the Secretary of the Interior is hereby empowered to pre- 
scribe such rules and regulations and establish such service as he shall deem neces- 
sary for the care and management of the same, and he is hereby authorized to 
permit examinations, excavations, and the gathering of objects of interest on such 
lands, in the same manner and for the same purposes as in the case of national parks 
established under the provisions of this act. 

Sec. 7. That all persons who shall unlawfully intrude upon such parks, or who 
shall without permission appropriate, injure, or destroy any game, fish, timber, or 
other public property therein, or injure or destroy any caves, ruins, or other works or 
relics therein, or commit unauthorized injury or waste, in any form whatsoever, upon 
the lands or other public property therein, or upon any of the lands or objects referred 
ito in section six of this act, or who shall violate any of the rules and regulations 
prescribed hereunder, shall, upon conviction, be fined in a sum not less than fifty 
dollars nor more than five thousand dollars, or be imprisoned for a period not less 
than fifteen days nor more than tw T elve months, or shall suffer both fine and impris- 
onment, in the discretion of the court. 

As so amended, it is desirable that this bill be passed as a substitute 
for all other bills now pending on the subject. 
Respectfully submitted. 

W. A. Richards, 

Com missioner. 
The Secretary of the Interior. 



DETAILED STATEMENT 



OF THE 



BUSINESS OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE, 

BY DIVISIONS AND IN SURVEYING DISTRICTS, 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1904 



63 



DETAILED STATEMENT 

OF THE 

BUSINESS OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE, 

BY DIVISIONS AND IN SURVEYING DISTRICTS, 

FOR THE 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1904. 



A detailed statement of the work performed in the General Land 
Office and surveying districts during- the year is given under the fol- 
lowing heads: 

1. A. Report of the chief clerk. 

2. B. Recorder's division. 

3. C. Public lands division. 

4. E. Surveying division. 

5. F. Railroad division. 

6. (L Preemption division. 

7. H. Contest division. 

8. K. Swamp-land division. 

9. L. Drafting division. 

10. M. Accounts division. 

11. N. Mineral division. 

12. P. Special service division. 

13. R. Forestry division. 

11. Report of the surveyor-general of Alaska. 

15. Report of the surveyor-general of Arizona. 

16. Report of the surveyor-general of California. 

17. Report of the surveyor-general of Colorado. 

18. Report of the surveyor-general of Florida. 

19. Report of the surveyor-general of Idaho. 

20. Report of the surveyor-general of Louisiana. 

21. Report of the surve} T or-general of Minnesota. 

22. Report of the surve}^or-general of Montana. 

23. Report of the surveyor-general of Nevada. 

24. Report of the surveyor-general of New Mexico. 

25. Report of the surveyor-general of North Dakota. 

26. Report of the surveyor-general of Oregon. 

27. Report of the surveyor-general of South Dakota. 

28. Report of the surveyor-general of Utah. 

29. Report of the surveyor-general of Washington. 

30. Report of the surveyor-general of Wyoming. 

8970—04 5 65 



66 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



A. -REPORT OF THE CHIEF CLERK. 

Department of the Interior, 

General Land Office, 
Washington, D. C., August 1, 190/+. 

Sir: The total number of communications received in the letter regis- 
tering room of this office for the fiscal year was 224,054, an increase 
of 6,010 over the preceding year. 

On July 1, 1904, there were 459 employees on the rolls of this office, 
an increase of 18 civil service clerks and 4 per diem clerks over the 
preceding year, although 12 of the civil service clerks were authorized 
by the urgency deficiency act of February 18, 1904, and entered on 
duty shortly after the passage of said act. 

There are also 3 inspectors of district land offices and the offices of 
the United States surveyors-general, 1 inspector of special agents, 70 
special agents, 12 examiners of surveys, 181 clerks employed in the 
116 district land offices, 210 clerks in the IT offices of United States 
surveyors-general, and 3 forest inspectors, 5 superintendents, 50 super- 
visors, and 492 rangers employed in the protection and management 
of 59 forest reserves, embracing an area of approximately 62,763,494 
acres. 

CONDITION OF BUSINESS IN THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

On July 1, 1904, there were 89,628 cases pending, while on July 1, 
1903, there were but 78,938. This increase in cases pending is 
accounted for b} T the fact that on July 1, 1904, there were 17,378 
entries pending in the recorder's division which had been examined in 
other divisions and approved for patenting, but upon which patents 
had not yet issued, while on July 1, 1903, there were only 5,964 cases 
pending in the recorder's division. 

There were 56,386 patents of all classes issued during the fiscal 
year, an increase of 2,021 over the preceding year. 

There were 2,504 mineral patents issued during the year, an increase 
of 1,400 over the preceding year. One year ago the examination of 
mineral entries was eighteen months in arrears, while now it is only 
six months in arrears; and mineral contests were eight months in 
arrears July 1, 1903, while now they are but two months in arrears. 

There were 2,612 forest lieu-selection patents issued during the 
year, while during the preceding year there were but 742 such patents 
issued. 

There were 58,420 cases approved for patenting during the year, an 
increase of 18,622 over the preceding year; and on July 1, 1904, there 
were pending in the public-lands division 37,624 final entries awaiting 
examination looking to their approval for patenting. 

The greatest volume of business pending in the office Jul} 7 1, 1904, 
was in the public-lands division and in the recorder's office, where 
there were 55,002 final entries awaiting examination or patenting. 
There are also 18,444 entries of various kinds pending in the special 
service division against which fraud has been alleged. In addition to 
the foregoing there were 2,205 mineral and coal entries, 4,965 forest 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 67 

lieu selections, 2,978 private land claims, 1,271 Indian allotments, 2,565 
desert entries, 505 timber-culture entries, 2,862,340 acres of school 
land and other State grant selections, 2,271 appealed and unappealed 
contest cases, and 611 timber trespass cases pending. In the swamp- 
land division there are 1,039,711 acres of swamp land in place and 
1,923,235 acres for which indemnit}^ is claimed awaiting adjudication. 

The drafting and surveying divisions are practically up to date in 
their w T ork. Division G (State selections and desert entries) is about 
ten months in arrears. The public lands division is nine months in 
arrears, the special service division fifteen months, the mineral division 
six months, the railroad division four months, and the contest division 
seven months on appealed and three months on unappealed cases. The 
repayment work of the accounts division is five months in arrears, and 
the forestry division is about one month, except the forest lieu-selec- 
tion section, which is about ten months in arrears. 

In the recorder's office the work is over two months in arrears. The 
work of this division consists mainly of issuing patents after the entries 
have been examined and approved in other divisions and making cer- 
tified copies, and also the custody of the office files of patented entries. 
The work of this division should be current, but the available force of 
clerks has not been sufficient. 

From the fact that there were but 56,386 patents issued during the 
past year, and that on July 1, 1901, there were 89,628 cases pending, 
it is apparent that there is more business now pending before this office 
than it will be possible to perform during the next year with the present 
force, and the large number of original entries that have been made at 
the various district land offices during the past three or four years 
would not indicate that there will be any immediate diminution in the 
number of final entries coming in from the district land offices for 
examination and patenting by this office. 

ADDITIONAL FORCE. 

In view of the above statements, the large amount of data to be pre- 
pared for the Land Commission appointed by the President to investi- 
gate and report in regard to the public-land laws, and that 36 clerks 
were detailed on July 1, 1901, to proceed to Minnesota, South and 
North Dakota to assist in the opening of Indian reservations, and the 
probable opening, during the summer of 1905, of the Crow and Flat 
Head Indian reservations in Montana, I am of opinion that an addi- 
tional force of 10 clerks, at a salary of $1,200 per annum, should be 
provided for in the first deficiency bill of the next Congress, and that 
they should also be included in the estimates for the legislative bill. 

ADDITIONAL SPACE. 

The question of additional floor space for clerks is a very important 
one, as with the present congested condition it is impracticable for 
the clerks to perform as much or as satisfactory work as could be 
attained if additional space were provided for 30 clerks. 

The question of adequate space for the files is also a very important 
one. At present practically every available foot of space is occupied, 
and considering the large volume of records and papers coining in 
each month from the 116 district land offices, and the offices of 17 



68 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

surveyors-general, it is very urgent that appropriate action be taken 
with a view to obtaining additional tile space. I estimate that at least 
57,600 cubic feet of space should be provided. 

I append hereto office letter of March 11, 1904, to the Secretary of 
the Interior, which sets forth fully the necessity for additional space. 
Very respectfully, 

J. T. Macey, Chief Clerk. 
Hon. W. A. Richards, 

Commissioner, General Land Office. 



Department of the Interior, 

General Land Office, 
Washington, D. C, March 11, 1904. 

Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt, by departmental reference for 
report as to the necessities of this office, and return of copy of letter dated February 
15, 1904, from Hon. Charles W. Fairbanks, chairman of the Committee on Public 
Buildings and Grounds, United States Senate, requesting information as to what 
additional building accommodations are required by the Department in this city. 

In reply I have to state that the space assigned to the General Land Office on its 
removal in March, 1900, to the public building in which it is now located was at that 
time barely adequate to the accommodation of the clerical force and the voluminous 
and valuable records of the office. Since then the force has been increased by 59 
clerks, and will very probably be still further increased on July 1 , 1904, by the addi- 
tion of 6 more, and a proper regard for the orderly and convenient working of the 
clerical force and the health of its individual members require that additional space be 
assigned to the office, if not in the building in which it is now located, then in some 
other suitable building conveniently situated. 

The great and regular increase of the past few years in the sales of public lands has 
caused a consequent increase in the records, until the congestion has become so em- 
phasized that great difficulty is experienced in the examination of old records for 
reply to inquiries. It is found to be almost impossible to detine what would be 
considered " dead" files. Inquiries are frequently received for information regarding 
transactions relating back to the organization of the office and subsequent years. 
The very old records have been from necessity, in order to make room for current 
files and" records and those of recent years, stored away in boxes and piled in heaps 
in the attic, to which access is difficult, thus causing a practical waste of time of 
clerks. A portion of them are also stored in the lower hall and passageway under 
the court, adjacent to steam pipes which so affect them that the binding of the books 
becomes destroyed, necessitating their rebinding at great expense, while the papers 
become so baked that they become brittle and break when handled. 

These old records and files are as valuable as the current, and while not so frequently 
referred to as the latter, a reference to them has very often to be made in order to 
trace back titles, etc., and their condition is such as to require three or four times 
the period for the examination of a particular record or file as would be necessary if 
they could be systematically arranged. For such purpose it is estimated that at least 
57,600 additional cubic feet of space will be required to accommodate the present and 
contemplated force, as well as to provide for the systematic arrangement and safety 
of the present records and the accumulation thereof for the next ten years. To 
reduce the above estimate to room, or floor space, at least 15 rooms 16 by 20 feet 
(height of ceiling not less than 12 feet) should be provided for the accommodation 
of the files alone. There will be, approximately, 450 employees in the General Land 
Office on July 1, 1904, and it is now occupying 137 rooms of varying dimensions. 
Many of these rooms are occupied solely as file rooms for old records, thus reducing 
the actual working rooms to so small a number as to interfere greatly in the transac- 
tion of the public business. It is therefore recommended that 13 additional rooms 
of the same dimensions as above be provided for the clerical force, making in all 
28 rooms that are required to place the office on a convenient and systematic 
working basis. 

The copy of Senator Fairbanks' s letter is herewith returned. 
Very respectfully, 

W. A. Richards, Commissioner. 

The Secretary of the Interior. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 69 



B.— RECORDER'S DIVISION. 

The recorder is required by statute, after the Commissioner has 
approved the issuance of a land patent, to attend to its correct engross- 
ing, recording, and transmission, to countersign the same, and affix the 
seal of the General Land Office thereto. 

He has charge of the records of patents issued and the certificates, 
proofs, and other muniments of title on which they are founded, pre- 
pares exemplified copies of these records and papers, and answers all 
communications relating to the same; also has charge of the records 
and papers pertaining to the various divisions of the office which have 
been discontinued because the work for which they were organized 
has been practically performed. 

Under the above statutory requirements and official regulations the 
following work was performed during the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1904: 

Patents issued as follows: 

Cash patents 21, 383 

H omestead patents 26, 646 

Timber-culture patents 999 

Forest-reserve lieu selection patents 2, 612 

Military bounty land patents 309 

Agricultural college scrip patents 3 

Sioux half-breed scrip patents 5 

Supreme Court scrip patents 10 

Surveyor-general's scrip patents 127 

Valentine scrip patents 2 

Porterfield scrip patents 1 

State desert lands, segregation patents 4 

Private land claim patents 95 

Mineral patents „ 2, 504 

Indian patents 1, 247 

Coal patents 174 

Swamp patents 54 

School patents 1 

Railroad patents * 210 

Total 56, 386 

Cases approved and awaiting patent July 1, 1903 5, 964 

Cases received during the year for patenting 67, 800 

Total 73, 764 

Patents issued 56, 386 

Cases approved and awaiting patent June 30, 1904 .-. . . 17, 378 

Total 73, 764 

Letters pending July 1, 1903 ^ 499 

Letters received during the year 26, 01 3 

Total 26,512 

Letters answered 1 £, 636 

Letters referred to other divisions ■ ~- 048 

Letters no answer required lj 469 

Letters pending June 30, 1904 359 

Total 26,512 



70 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Exemplified copies furnished 11, 913 

Fees for copies $15, 319. 56 



Attorneys' cards received and answered 
Index cards written . . . 
Index cards examined. 

Circulars sent out 

Pages of recording. 

Letters written 

Patents transmitted . . . 



21,396 

30, 547 

18, 680 

655 

75, 077 
25, 370 
54. 678 



REVOLUTIONARY BOUNTY LAND SCRIP. 

[Acts of August 31, 1852, and June 22, 1860, founded on Virginia military land warrants granted for 
services in the war of the Revolution.] 

The number of such claims for scrip now pending for want of additional evidence 
is 307, aggregating 97,054ff acres. 

PORTERFIELD WARRANTS. 

[Act of April 11, I860.] 

The original number of warrants issued under this act, and aggregating 6,133 acres, 
w T as subdivided into 153 warrants. 

One hundred and twenty-five of said warrants have been patented, leaving 28 out- 
standing and unsatisfied, each calling for 40 acres. 

Condition of bounty-land business under acts of 1812, 1847, 1850, 1852, and 1855, showing 
the issues and locations from the commencement of operations under said acts to June SO, 
1904. 



Grade of warrants. 


Warrants issued. 


Warrants located. 


Warrants outstand- 
ing. 




Number. 


Acres. 


Number. 


Acres. 


Number. 


Acres. 


Act of 1812: 

160 acres 


28,085 
1,101 


4,493,600 
352, 320 


27, 978 
1,034 


4, 476, 480 
330, 380 


107 
67 


17, 120 


320 acres 


21,440 






Total 


29, 186 


4, 845, 920 


29, 012 


4, 806, 860 


174 


38, 560 




Act of 1847: 

160 acres 


80, 687 
7,585 


12, 909, 920 
303, 400 


79, 174 
7,101 


12, 667, 840 
284, 040 


1,513 

484 


242,080 




19, 360 




Total 


88, 272 


13,213,320 


86, 275 


12,951,880 


1,997 


261, 440 




Act of 1850: 

160 acres 


27, 449 
57,717 
103, 978 


4, 391, 840 
4, 617, 360 
4, 159, 120 


26, 899 

56, 428 

100, 902 


4,303,840 
4, 514, 240 
4, 036, 080 


550 
1,289 
3,101 


88, 300 


80 acres 


103, 120 




124, 040 




Total 


189, 144 


13, 168, 320 


184, 229 


12,854,160 


4,940 


315, 460 






Act of 1852: 

160 acres 


1,223 
1,699 
9,070 


195, 680 
135, 920 
362, 800 


1,196 
1,667 
8,891 


191, 360 
133, 360 
355, 640 


27 

32 

179 


4,320 


80 acres 


2,560 




7,160 






Total 


11, 992 


694, 400 


11, 754 


680, 360 


238 


14,040 






Act of 1855: 

160 acres 


115,648 

97, 077 

49, 480 

359 

542 

5 


18, 503, 680 

11, 649, 240 

3, 958, 400 

21, 540 

21, 680 

50 


110, 715 

91, 128 

48, 341 

317 

468 

3 


17, 714, 400 

10, 935, 360 

3,867,280 

19, 020 

18, 720 
30 


4,933 

5, 938 

1,139 

42 

74 

2 


789, 280 


120 acres 


712, 560 


80 acres 


91, 120 




2, 520 




2,960 




20 






Total 


263, 111 


34, 154, 590 


250, 972 


32, 554, 810 


12, 128 


1, 598, 460 







SUMMARY. 



Act of 1812 


29, 186 
88, 272 

189, 144 
11, 992 

263,111 


4, 845, 920 
13, 213, 320 
13, 168, 320 
694, 400 
34.154.590 


29, 012 
86,275 

184, 229 
11,754 

250, 972 


4, 806, 860 

12, 951, 880 

12, 854, 160 

680, 360 

32, 554, 810 


174 

1,997 

4,940 

238 

12, 128 


38, 560 


Act of 1847 


261, 440 

315, 460 

14,040 


Act of 1850 


Act of 1852 


Act of 1855 


1, 598, 460 








Total 


581,705 1 66.076.550 


562, 242 


63, 848, 070 


19, 477 


7, 227, 960 











REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 7l 



The following is a statement of the number of acres represented by 
military bounty land warrants located in the several public land States 
and Territories for the year ended June 30, 1904, or not heretofore 
reported, which warrants were issued under the acts of 1847, 1850, 
1852, and 1855. The aggregate number of acres is computed at the 
rate of $1.25 per acre. It does not show the exact area of the lands 
located with the warrants. 



Arkansas 
Alabama. 
Louisiana . 
Michigan 



Acres. 

12, 720 
1,280 
3,540 

680 



Acres. 

Minnesota 680 

Mississippi 12, 060 



Total 



30, 960 



Denomination of warrants. 


40 acres. 


80 acres. 


120 acres. 


160 acres. 


Total. 


Act of 1847 


9 

45 
3 
1 






14 

7 

1 

99 


2,600 
4 520 


Act of 1850 


20 

1 

41 




Act of 1852 




360 


Act of 1855 


36 


23, 480 






Total 


58 


62 


36 


121 


30,960 





72 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



C.— PUBLIC LANDS DIVISION. 

This division has charge of the permanent tract books in which space 
is allowed for the posting of each legal subdivision established bj- sur- 
veys and shown by the official plats which has heretofore been or is 
now a part of the public domain. In these books are noted descrip- 
tions of all entries, filings, selections, grants, reservations, and cancel- 
lations thereof, either by relinquishment or by action of this Office, 
and all restorations to the public domain. Therefore all claims to 
public lands must be recorded in these books, as well as every contest, 
conflict, and anything affecting the status of any tract, to the end that 
the status of any particular tract, entry, filing, selection, grant, or 
reservation ma} r be known upon reference to these records. 

It devolves upon this division to examine the greater portion of all 
entries made with regard to the regularity of the entiy papers, the 
qualifications o^f the en try men, and the final papers as to the sufficiency 
of the proofs submitted, and to furnish the status showing any appar- 
ent conflicts at the date of posting of all entries, selections, filings, and 
applications which are referred to other divisions for final action. All 
final and commuted homesteads, timber land, cash, private cash, grad- 
uation cash, and various other classes of entries, including scrip loca- 
tions and Indian homesteads, are, if contested, finally adjudicated and 
disposed of by this division. 

This division also prepares instructions to the district land officers 
in regard to the reclamation projects under the act of June 17, 1902 
(32 Stat., 388), and passes upon entries of such lands. It also has 
charge of the sales of timber on ceded Chippewa lands, and of the log- 
ging operations on said lands, under the act of June 27, 1902 (32 Stat., 
400). 

There is also allotted to this division a great deal of important mis- 
cellaneous work, such as the making of reports and recommendations 
relative to legislation affecting public lands and work incidental to the 
disposal of great areas of ceded Indian lands and lands restored to the 
public domain from a state of reservation imposed by railroad grants, 
reservoir sites, abandoned militaiy reservations, etc., in which numer- 
ous complicated questions are constantly arising as to the legal rights 
accruing under the special laws providing for the disposal thereof and 
the instructions in regard thereto, requiring decisions and new rulings 
covering nice points of law. 

During the past year 58,420 final homestead entries were approved 
and sent to Division B for patenting, being an increase over the pre- 
vious year of 18,645. The number of letters and decisions written in 
the division was 49,161, an increase of 3,696 over the previous year. 
These two items are in excess of any previous year in the history of 
the division. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 73 

Instructions and schedules were prepared and issued by this division 
during the past year for the sale and disposal of agricultural lands in 
the following reservations, viz: 

Acres. 

Chippewa, Minnesota 1, 017, 618. 12 

Red Lake, Minnesota 256, 143. 58 

Rosebud, South Dakota 385, 887. 11 

Devils Lake, North Dakota 88, 948. 39 

Grand Ronde, Oregon 26, 264. 65 

Total 1, 774, 861. 85 

Instructions have also been issued under the act of April 28, 1904 
(33 Stat., 547), known as the Kinkaid Act, for the disposal of 8,000,000 
acres of land in Nebraska. One million acres of land were withdrawn 
under said law as being practically susceptible of irrigation. 

There were issued, on June 3, 1901, instructions in regard to the 
Minidoka irrigation project in Idaho, and instructions are being pre- 
pared concerning the Truckee-Carson reclamation project in Nevada, 
in accordance with the provisions of the act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 
388). 

The examination of lands in the various ceded Chippewa reservations 
was completed the past \^ear under the direction of this division, the 
reports showing that 725,818.99 acres were examined, of which 88,320 
acres were classified as pine lands. 

There were two sales of pine timber on ceded Chippewa lands, 
Minnesota, the past year, 115,000,000 feet of timber being sold for 
$2,650,903, of which amount 20 per cent was paid to secure the bids. 

Instructions and schedules have also been prepared for the sale on 
November 15 next 4 of the pine timber on 116,190.26 acres of "pine" 
lands in the ceded Chippewa reservations, and for the sale on Novem- 
ber 17 next of 95 per cent of the timber on 16,833.96 acres. 

Logging operations have been carried on under the direction of this 
division on 63 different sections of ceded Chippewa lands. There have 
been cut and paid for 45,590,118 feet of timber, the price paid for the 
same being $269,198.13. 

The expense to the Indians of logging said timber, in the way of 
salaries, room rental, transportation, etc., has been $14,421.80. 

Work performed in the division during the year ended June 30, 1904- 

Letters pending June 30, 1903 . 5, 861 

Letters received during the year 55, 835 

61, 696 

Letters disposed of: 

By answer 26, 744 

By reference 7, 420 

By filing (no answer) 22, 844 

57, 008 

Balance pending June 30, 1904 4, 688 

61,696 

Miscellaneous letters written 32, 769 

Decisions written 16, 392 

Appeals transmitted to Secretary 212 

Cancellations and relinquishments noted 41 > 832 

Entries, filings, and selections posted .(. 244, 952 



74 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

ORIGINAL ENTRIES. 

Pending June 30, 1903 255, 724 

Received during the year 98, 948 

Cancellations 25, 171 

Disposed of by final entry 47, 786 

Sent to other divisions 8, 789 

81, 746 

Balance pending June 30, 1904 272, 926 

FINAL ENTRIES. 

Pending June 30, 1903 39, 310 

Received during the year 67, 386 

Disposed of by cancellation 167 

Posted and sent to other divisions for action 10, 485 

Approved for patent 58, 420 

69, Q72 

Pending June 30, 1904 37, 624 



CLASSIFICATION OF PENDING FINAL ENTRIES. 



354, 672 



354, 672 



106, 696 



106, 696 



Commuted and final homesteads 25, 928 

Other cash 10, 041 

Miscellaneous 1, 655 

Total 37,624 

FINAL HOMESTEADS. 

Statement of the number and area of final homestead entries made from the passage of the 
homestead act {May 20, 1862) to June 30, 1904. 



Fiscal year ending June 
30— 


Number. 


Acres. 


Fiscal year ending June 
30— 


Number. 


Acres. 


1868..! 


2,772 
3, 965 
4,041 
5,087 
5,917 
10,311 
14, 129 
18, 293 


355, 086. 04 

504, 301. 97 

519, 727. 84 

629, 162. 25 

707,409.83 

1,224,890.93 

1,585,781.56 

2, 068, 537. 74 

2, 590, 552. 81 

2, 407, 828. 19 

2, 662, 980. 82 

2, 070, 842. 39 

1 , 938, 234. 89 

1, 928, 004. 76 

2, 219, 453. 80 
2, 504, 414. 51 
2, 945, 574. 72 
3,032,679.11 
2, 663, 531. 83 
2, 749, 037. 48 


1888 


22,413 
25, 549 
28, 080 
27, 686 
22, 822 
24, 204 
20, 544 
20, 922 
20, 099 
20, 115 
22, 281 

22, 812 
25,286 
37, 568 
31, 627 
26, 373 

23, 932 


3, 175, 400. 64 


1869 


1889 


3, 681, 708. 80 


1870 


1890 . . . 


4, 060, 592. 77 


1871 


1891 


3, 954, 587. 77 


1872 


1892 


3, 259, 897. 07 


1873 


1893 


3, 477, 231. 63 


1874 


1894 


2, 929, 947. 41 


1875 


1895 


2, 980, 809. 30 


1876 

1877 


22, 530 
19, 900 
22, 460 


1896 


2, 790, 242. 55 


1897 


2, 778, 404. 20 


1878 


1898 


3, 095, 017. 75 


1879 


17, 391 
15, 441 
15,077 
17,174 
18, 998 
21,843 
22, 066 
19, 356 
19, 866 


1899 . . . 


3, 134, 149. 44 
3, 477, 842. 71 


1880 


1900 . . . 


1881 


1901 . . 


5,241,120.76 


1882 


1902 


4, 342, 747. 70 


1883 


1903 


3, 576, 964. 14 


1884 


1904 


3,232,716.75 


1885 


Total 




1886 


718, 930 


96, 495, 414. 86 


1887 











No. 1064. — Notice of the discontinuance of the Oklahoma City, Okla., land district and 
•the transfer of the lands embraced therein to the Guthrie, Okla., land district, and the 
records and business of the Oklahoma City, Okla., land office to the Guthrie, Okla., land 
office. 

Notice is hereby given that the President of the United States, by Executive 
Order, dated January 15, 1904, has, pursuant to the provisions of sections 2250, 2252, 
2253 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, directed that — 

First. The Oklahoma land district, Oklahoma, be discontinued and the lands 
therein be consolidated with and made a part of the Guthrie land district, Oklahoma. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 75 

Second. The Oklahoma land office, Oklahoma, be discontinued and its business 
and archives be transferred to the Guthrie land office, Oklahoma. 

In pursuance of said Executive Order the land office at Oklahoma City, Okla., will 
be permanently closed and discontinued at the close of business hours on March 31, 
1901, and its business and archives transferred to and made a part of the land office 
at Guthrie, Okla., on April 1, 1904. 

Given under my hand at the city of Washington, this 28th dav of Januarv, A. D 
1904. 

By the President: 

W. A. Richards, 
Commissioner of the General Land Office. 



No. 1071. — Notice of the creation of an additional land district in the State of North Dakota, 
to be known as the Dickinson land district, and the location of the land office thereof at 
Dickinson, N. Dak. 

Notice is hereby given that by an act of Congress approved March 16, 1904, it was 
enacted : 

That all that portion of North Dakota lying south of the twelfth standard parallel 
and west of the range line between ranges ninety and ninety-one west of the princi- 
pal meridian be, and the same is hereby, created into a separate land district, to be 
known as the Dickinson district, and the land office for said district shall be located 
at the town of Dickinson until such time as the President may, in his discretion, 
remove the site of said land office from said town. * * * 

The land office at Dickinson, N. Dak., will be open for the transaction of public 
business on July 1, 1904. 

Given under my hand, at the city of Washington, this 25th day of March, A. D. 
1904. 

By the President: 

W. A. Richards, 
Commissioner of the General Land Office. 



No. 1070. — Notice of definite location of the boundary between the Boise and Lewiston land 
districts in the State of Ldaho. 

Notice is hereby given that the President of the United States, by Executive Order, 
dated March 18, 1904, has, pursuant to the provisions of section 2253 of the Revised 
Statutes of the United States, and by the authority therein given, directed that the 
boundary line between the Boise and Lewiston land districts, in the State of Idaho, 
be established as follows: 

Beginning at the point where the line between townships 24 and 25 north of the 
base line, when produced, will intersect the Snake River, at the western boundary 
of Idaho, thence east between said townships 24 and 25 north to the point of inter- 
section of said township line with the Salmon River, thence up said Salmon River 
to the point of intersection of the line between ranges 9 and 10 east of the Boise 
meridian, the same being the northeast corner of the Boise land district. 

In pursuance of said Executive Order, the change of boundary line directed will 
take effect on May 2, 1904, and registers and receivers of the land offices at Boisoand 
Lewiston are hereby instructed to make the proper notation of the definite establish- 
ment of this boundary upon their records and, in the acceptance of entries of public 
lands in their respective districts, to be governed accordingly. 

Given under my hand, at the city of Washington, this 24th dav of March, A. D. 
1904. 

By the President: 

W. A. Richards, 
Commissioner of the General Land <>jHc> \ 



76 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



No. 1084. — Notice of change of boundaries of the Grand Forks and Devils Lake land dis- 
tricts, in the State of North Dakota. 

Notice is hereby given that the President of the United States, by Executive Order, 
dated June 2, 1904, has, pursuant to the provisions of section 2253 of the Revised 
Statutes of the United States, and by virtue of the authority therein given, directed 
that the lands included within the following boundaries and being a portion of the 
Grand Forks land district, in the State of North Dakota, be transferred to and made 
a part of the Devils Lake land district in said State: 

Beginning at the southeast corner of township 149 north, range 62 west of the fifth 
principal meridian; thence north to the northeast corner of said township; thence 
east to the southeast corner of township 150 north, range 61 west; thence north on 
the line between ranges 60 and 61 to the northeast corner of township 150 north, 
range 61 west; thence west to the nortlrwest corner of the same township; thence 
north on the line between ranges 61 and 62 to the northeast corner of township 152 
north, range 62 west; thence west on the line between townships 152 and 153 to a 
point in the lake which, if established, would be the northwest corner to township 
152 north, range 63 west; thence south on the line between ranges 63 and 64 to its 
intersection with the twelfth standard parallel; thence east on said standard parallel 
to the place of beginning. 

In pursuance of said Executive Order, the transfer of the lands included within 
the boundaries above indicated will take effect on August 1, 1904. 

Given under my hand, at the city of Washington, D. C, this 6th day of June, 
A. D. 1904. 

By the President: J< H j^ 

Acting Commissioner of the General Land Office. 



List of United States district land offices June 30, 1904- 



Name of office. 


State or Territory. 


Date of act 
or Executive 

order 
authorizing 
the estab- 
lishment. 


Date of 
opening.** 


Huntsville 




Mar. 3,1807 
July 10,1832 
Apr. 2, 1902 
Nov. 3, 1868 
Apr. 22,1881 
Jan. 10,1871 
July 14,1870 
do 


July 27,1810 
bJan. 1,1834 


Montgomery 


do 


Juneau 




June 20, 1902 


Preseott 


Arizona 

do 


Oct. 1, 1870 


Tucson 


July 1,1881 


Camden 




Mar. 20, 1871 


Darda nelle 


do 


May 31,1871 


Harrison 


do 


Feb. 27,1871 


Little Rock 


...do ... 


Feb. 17,1818 
Mar. 29,1858 
Apr. 22,1886 
June 12,1869 
Mar. 3, 1853 
May 13,1890 
Julv 26,1866 
Jan. 16,1857 
Mar. 29,1858 
Feb. 10,1871 
Mar. 29,1858 
Feb. 6, 1890 
June 20,1874 
June 4, 1864 
Apr. 20,1882 
July 3, 1884 
Oct. 20,1882 
Feb. 6, 1890 
Aug. 4, 1886 
Apr. 5, 1879 
Jan. 4, 1888 
May 27,1870 
Feb. 6, 1890 
June 8,1872 
Sept. 3,1886 
Julv 26,1866 
Julv 14,1884 
Jan. 24,1883 
July 26,1866 
Aug. 2, 1852 
Dec. 20,1893 
. do. 


Sept. 1,1821 
Julv 24,1858 
Mar. 22,1887 


Eureka 




Independence 


do ... 


Los Angeles 


...do ... 


Sept, 22, 1869 
Apr. 27,1858 
Julv 15,1890 


Marysville 


do 


Redding 


...do.. 


Sacramento 


do 


Nov. 12,1867 


San Francisco 


do 


Nov. 3, 1857 


Stockton 


...do ... 


July 1, 1858 
Mar. 2, 1871 
July 10,1858 
Aug. 1,1890 
Mar. 22,1875 


Susanville 


...do ... 


Visalia 


...do ... 


Akron 




Del Norte 


do 


Denver 


do 


Aug. 15,1864 
Oct. 2, 1882 


Durango 


...do 


Grleuwood Springs 


do 


Nov. 10,1884 


Gunnison 


...do ... 


Apr. 2, 1883 
Sept. 7,1890 
Jan. 3, 1887 


Hugo 


...do ... 


Lamar 


do ... 


Leadville 


do ... 


July 1,1879 
Sept. 1, 1888 
Jan. 16,1871 
Aug. 1, 1890 
Apr. 30,1873 
Nov. 16,1886 
Jan. 13,1868 
Dec. 21,1885 


Montrose 


do... 


Pueblo , 


...do 


Sterling 


...do 


Gainesville 




Blackfoot 




Boise 


do... 


Cceur d' Alene 


do... 


Hailev 


...do 


July 16,1883 
Sept. 26, 1871 
Jan. 28,1853 
Feb. 5, 1894 
Feb. 3, 1894 
Sept. 10,1861 

Opt 90 187Q 


Lewiston 


...do ... 


Des Moines 




Colby 




Dodge City 


do.... 


Topeka 


do 


July 24,1861 
July 8 1879 


Wakeenev 


...do ... 


a Where date of opening is not known, < 


late of first entry made at the 


office is given, b About. 



EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 77 



List of United States district land offices June 30, 1904 — Continued. 



Home of office. 


State and Territory. 


Date of act 
or Executive 

order 
authorizing 
the estab- 
lishment. 


Date of 
opening. 






July 7,1838 
Mar. 3,1811 
Mar. 19,1857 
Apr. 1, 1903 
Apr. 29,1878 
Mar. 27,1862 
Feb. 23,1858 
June 23,1836 
Mav 18,1857 
Mav 20,1861 
June 26, 1834 
June 20, 1874 
Mav 8, 1902 
Mar. 2,1867 
Mar. 2,1897 
Apr. 1, 1890 
Apr. 30,1880 
Apr. 1,1890 
Apr. 16,1890 
do 


Oct. 12,1838 




do 






July 11. [857 








do 


May 5, 1879 
Jan. 15,1863 

Apr. 29,1858 
July 2.".. 1836 
Aug. 1,1857 
July 8,1861 
Oct 4 1838 


Duluth 


do... 


St. Cloud 


do ... 












do ... 




do 










do 


Aug. 1,1902 
Apr. 27,1867 
July 1 1897 




do ... 




do 




do 


Nov. 26, L890 
Oct 19 1880 




do ... 




do ... 


Apr. 20,1891 
July 1 1890 








do ... 


July 7 1890 




do... 


July 7,1868 
June 19,1882 
Apr. 22. 1872 
Apr. 7. 1888 
Mav 3,1886 
June 19,1882 
July 2,1862 
Dec. 18,1888 
Mar. 10,1883 
Mar. 1, 1889 
May 24,1858 
Apr. 24,1874 
Mar. 3,1883 
Mar. 16,1904 
Dec. 29,1873 
Jan. 21,1880 
Sept. 26, 1890 
Aug. 25,1893 
July 4,1901 
Mar. 3, 1889 
do 


Sept. 7, 1868 
June !■"•. L883 
Apr. 11,1873 
July Hi, 1888 
July 2,1887 


McCook 


do... 


North Platte 


do 


O'Neill 


do 


Sidnev 


do 




do 


Julv 7 1883 






Mar. 1 L864 






Aug. 12,1889 




:do 


May 1,1883 
Dee. 9,1889 
Nov. 24,1858 




do... 


Santa Fe 


<lo 






Oct. 12,1874 




do ... 


Aug. 21. L883 




do ... 


Julv 1,1904 




do 


Sept, 1 . 1 874 


Grand Forks 


do 


Apr. 20, 1880 




...do ... 


Oct. 1,1891 






Sept. 16,1893 




do 


Aug. 6,1901 




do 


Apr. 22, L889 




...do 


Apr. 23,1889 




...do ... 


July 4,1901 
Jan. 18,1897 
Aug. 25,1893 
July 3,1866 
June 6, 1877 
Aug. 24, 1854 
June 1,1889 
Sept. 15, 1859 
Jan. 11,1875 
Mar. 2::, 1882 
Feb. 10,1890 
Mar. 23,1882 
July 14,1880 
Feb. 10,1890 
Dec. 13,1888 
Apr. 5,1879 
July If,. L868 
Apr. 11,1885 
May 16,1890 


Aug. 6, 1901 




do 


June 24,1897 




..do . 


Sept. 16,1893 






Nov. L5, L867 




do 


Aug. 6,1877 




...do 


Jan. 1,1855 




do 


Sept. 2, 1 889 




...do 


Jan. 3,1860 


The Dalles 


...do ... 


June 1,1875 






Oct. 2, 1882 




do 


Apr. 3,1890 




.do 


Oct. 9,1882 


Mitchell 


...do... 


Jan. 3,1882 




...do 


May L2.1890 




....do 


Jan. 




do 


Mav 1,1880 




Utah 


Nov. 1,1868 






Apr. 24,1885 




do 


Oct. 1,1890 




do 


June 27. L887 
June 2:-!, L883 
May 16,1860 
Mar. 3,1871 
Mav 16,1890 
Sept. 28, L886 
Mar. 3,1857 
June 19,1872 
Mar. 3,1887 
Feb. 5,1870 
Apr. 23,1890 
Aug. 9,1876 
Apr. 23.1890 
Apr. 3,1890 


Dec. 3,1887 




...do 


Oct. 1,1883 




...do 


Julj 3,1861 


Walla Walla 


...do 


July 17,1871 




.. do 


Nov. 6,1890 




Wisconsin 


Nov. 13, 1886 




do 


July 1,1857 




do 


Aug. L9, L872 


Buffalo .. 


Wyoming 


Mav 1,1888 




do 


Aug. 10, L870 




do 


Nov. 1 L890 




....In 


Aug. 13, 1877 




...do 


Nov. 


Sundance 


do 


Oct. 27.! 890 



a About. 

Note.— By act of July 31, 1876, the land offices in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois were abolished, and 
bvact of March 3, 1877, the vacant tracts of public lands in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois ai 
subject to entry and location at the General Land Office. Washington. D. C. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



VACANT PUBLIC LANDS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

The following tables are based on reports furnished by the district 
land offices and are arranged to show, by States, Territories, land dis- 
tricts, and counties, the area of unappropriated and unreserved public 
lands, surveyed and unsurveyed; the area of lands reserved; the area 
of lands appropriated, and the total area of each county or part of 
county in the respective land districts, to which is added a brief 
description of the character of the vacant lands. 

The areas in the column of reserved lands include all lands reserved 
for any purpose whatsoever which may be eventually restored to the 
public domain, and those in the column of appropriated lands include 
all lands embraced in selections, tilings, and entries, perfected and 
unperfected, and also the area of lands granted for school purposes. 

The quantity of appropriated lands does not show an increase over 
the quantity reported for the preceding year to the extent of the lands 
entered during the liscal year covered by this report, because the areas 
embraced in entries, filings, or selections which have been canceled 
for any reason decreases the quantity of appropriated lands. If the 
area relieved from appropriation by cancellation of entries, filings, or 
selections should exceed the area entered, selected, or filed upon, 
there would be a decrease in the area of appropriated lands and a 
corresponding increase in the area of vacant lands. 

While the figures contained in the tables may not be absolutely cor- 
rect, owing to liability to error in a work of such magnitude and to the 
necessity of making estimates of unsurveyed lands, it is believed that 
they are a close approximation of the actual areas. The statement is 
intended to inform correspondents and the general public as to whether 
there is much, little, or no public land in the several land States and 
Territories and the land districts therein, and in particular counties or 
localities. 

It will be borne in mind that the greater portion of the vacant land 
is in the timbered regions of the Southern States, the lake region, the 
Pacific coast, and the mountainous and arid regions of the Far West, 
and that the portion of lands cultivable without clearing or irrigation 
is comparatively small. It is a reasonable conclusion, however, that 
vast bodies of the arid lands will in time be reclaimed by irrigation as 
the result of the efforts of the Government to construct storage basins 
and ditches for the purpose, as provided in the act of Congress 
approved June 17, 1902, seconded, as undoubtedly it will be, by pri- 
vate enterprise. 

In naming the land districts in the following statement the names of 
the present offices are adopted as the names of the districts, for the 
reason that districts are thus named and known by settlers, and because 
it would be inconvenient to give the statutory names of the different 
districts created by Congress in addition to the names of the offices. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 79 



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Total area 
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REPORT OF. COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 131 



E.— DIVISION OF PUBLIC SURVEYS. 

The work performed in this division during- the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1904, was as follows: 

Letters: 

On hand unanswered July 1, 1903 205 

Received during the year 7, 124 

Written during the year 6, 201 

Disposed of during the year 7, 060 

Remaining on hand July 1, 1904 269 

Pages of press copy typewritten 15, 190 

Pages of record copied 2, 171 

Copies of field notes : 

Pages of field notes for official and individual use 992 

Surveying returns: 

Returns pending July 1, 1903 107 

Received during the year 1 77 

Acted on during the vear 171 

On hand July 1 , 1904. 113 

Reports of examinations of surveys: 

Reports pending July 1, 1903 109 

Received during the year 136 

Acted on during the year 144 

On hand July 1, 1904 101 

Surveving contracts: 

Pending July 1, 1903 

Contracts received during the year 127 

Special instructions (in lieu of contracts) received during the year 63 

Supplemental instructions received and approved 39 

Contracts acted on during the year 127 

Special instructions acted upon and approved during the year 63 

Contracts canceled during the year 1 

Contracts pending July 1, 1904 



132 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement showing the number of acres of public lands surveyed in the following land States 
and Territories up to June 30, 1903, during the past fiscal year, and the total of public 
lands surveyed up to June 30, 1904; cdso the total area of the public domain remaining 
unsurveyed within the same. 



Land State and 
Territories. 


In acres. 


In square 
miles. 


Up to June 
30, 1903. 


Under 
contracts 
madeprior 

to June 
30, 1903, 
and not 
heretofore 
reported 
because 
accepted 
since June 
30, 1903. 


Under 
contracts 
made for 
the fiscal 
year end- 
ing June 

30; 1904. 


Total up to 

June 30, 

1904. 


Total area 
of public 
and Indian 
lands re- 
maining 
unsurvey- 
ed, includ- 
ing the 
area of pri- 
vate land 
claims sur- 
veyed up 
to June 30, 
1904. 




32, 657, 920 
33, 543, 680 
99, 969, 920 
66, 348, 160 


51,028 
52, 412 

156, 203 

103, 669 
54, 801 
56, 004 
35, 860 
55, 697 
83, 271 
81, 848 
45, 399 
57, 530 
79, 997 
46, 383 
68, 431 

146, 240 
76, 777 

109, 901 
70, 172 
40, 723 
95, 746 
76, 885 
82,096 
55,117 
66, 792 
97, 552 

575, 162 

113, 738 
30, 717 

122, 545 
38, 710 


32,657,920 
33,543,680 
76. 943, 485 
62,454,648 
30,841,141 
35, 842, 560 
22, 950, 400 
35,646,080 
20, 965, 555 
52. 382, 720 
27, 175, 362 
36, 819, 200 
48, 270, 519 
29,685,120 
43, 795, 840 
37,335,059 
49, 087, 856 
37, 933, 815 
39, 735, 632 
26, 062, 720 
47, 505, 894 
46, 404, 415 
20, 700, 412 
35,274,880 
28, 133, 427 
55,112.211 
6,476 
18, 723, 442 
19, 658, 880 
51, 178, 187 
24, 695, 192 






32, 657, 920 
33, 543, 680 
77, 155, 009 
62, 563, 238 
30,841,141 
35, 842, 560 
22, 950, 400 
35, 646, 080 














211, 524 
108, 590 




22,814,911 

3, 784, 922 








35. 07°. 640 




4,231,499 


Illinois... . 35,842,560 








Indiana . . 22,950,400 








Iowa < 35, 646, 080 








Idaho 53,293,440 

Kansas 52,382,720 

Louisiana . i 29,055,360 


505, 166 




21,470,721 
52, 382, 720 
27, 175, 362 
36, 819, 200 
48,545,202 
29, 685, 120 
43, 795, 840 
39. 665, 066 
49,087,S56 


31,822,719 








1, 879, 998 


Michigan . . 36.819.200 


«40 
274, 636 


„. 


Minnesota 


51, 198, 080 
29,685,120 


2, 652, 878 




43, 795, 840 
93, 593, 600 
49,137,280 
70,336,640 
44, 910, 080 
26,062,72(1 
61,277,440 
49, 206, 400 
52,541,440 
35,274,880 
42, 746, 880 
62, 433, 280 
368, 103, 6S0 
72, 792, 320 
19,658,880 
78, 428, 800 
24,774,400 










233, 000 




53, 928, 534 
49, 424 








68, 159 
529, 021 




38, 001 , 974 
40, 265, 437 
26,062,720 
17,865,703 
47, 563, 549 
21,005,455 

35. 274. 880 

28. 465. 881 
55,541,382 

6,477 
19,153,628 
19, 658, 880 
51,529,335 


32, 334,666 


North Dakota 

Ohio 


784 


4, 644, 643 




359, 809 

1, 159, 134 

305, 043 

ad 

331,959 

429, 141 

1 

430, 186 




13,411,737 






1,642,851 


Utah .. 




31,535,985 




a 125 

495 




Washington 

Wyoming 


14, 280, 999 
6,891,898 




368. 097, 203 






53,638,692 








351,148 




26, 899, 465 






24, 695, 192 


79, 208 










Total 


1,809,539,840 


2, 827, 406 


1,127,522,758 


7, 393, 524 


1,326 


1,134,917,608 


''074,622,232 



a This area appears to have been counted in former reports and is therefore not added in this 
column. 

i> This estimate is of a very general nature and affords no index to the disposable volume of land 
remaining, nor the amount available for agricultural purposes. It includes Indian and other public 
reservations, unsurveyed private land claims, as well as surveyed private land claims in the districts 
of Arizona, California, Colorado, and New Mexico; the sixteenth and thirty-sixth sections reserved 
for common schools; unsurveyed lands embraced in railroad, swamp lands, and other grants: the 
great mountain areas; the areas of unsurveyed rivers and lakes, and large areas wholly unproductive 
and unavailable for ordinary purposes. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 133 









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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 135 
MILITARY RESERVATIONS. 

Names and locations of existing military reservations in the public-land States and Terri- 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office. 



Name and location of reservation. 



Area in 
acres. 



Date of President's order or other 
authority, and remarks. 



ALASKA. 

Fort Wrangell: 

In the town of Fort Wrangell, a tract of land 
upon which are the buildings now occu- 
pied by the civil government, described 
as follows: Beginning on the south side 
of Main street, at the northwest corner of 
the warehouse occupied by Sylvester & 
Reid; thence in a northwesterly direction 
by land occupied by Rufus Sylvester, 210 
feet to a post in picket fence; thence in a 
northeasterly direction along said picket 
fence, old stockade blockouse, and lands 
occupied by Rufus Sylvester, '214 feet to a 
post; thence in a northwesterly direction 
at a right angle with aforesaid line by 
lands of the United States, 240 feet to a 
post; thence in a southwesterly direction 
and .parallel with the northwest wall of 
the old fort and 40 feet distant from said 
wall by lands of the United States, 550 feet 
to low tide-water mark; thence along low 
tide- water mark in a southeasterly direc- 
tion by the sea 450 feet to the south side 
of Main street: thence along south side of 
Main street to place of beginning. 
Sitka: 

The plat of ground marked No. 20 on the map. 
but more particularly described as follows: 
Commencing at the northern corner of 
that plat of ground which we hereafter 
ask shall be reserved as a public common 
and now known as the "parade ground,' 
near the Presbvterian Church, and run- 
ning N.33° E. 64. G8 feet; thence W. 35° N. 
59.73 feet; thence N. 39° E. 87.79 feet to a 
road 26.40 feet Wide, crossing this and con- 
tinuing the line (N.39° E.) 59.40 feet; 
thence E.39° S. 104.28 feet: thence S. 104.28 
feet; thence S.30° W. 46.20 feet to a road 
26.40 feet wide: thence on south side of 
said road E.30° S. 86.46 feet; thence S.29° 
W. 111.54 feet: thence W. 4° N. 150.40 feet to 
point of starting, for marine or military 
baracks and garden. 

Ten acres of land, including that now desig- 
nated on the plat of land as surveyed and 
claimed by Rev. Sheldon Jackson for the 
Presbyterian Board of Home Missions, as 
the same appears of record in the office of 
the recorder ex officio for this district and 
marked "Military cemetery," and more 
particularly described as follows; Begin- 
ning at corner mark No. 8 on said plat, 
running northwesterly 660 feet; thence at 
right angles southwesterly 660 feet; thence 
southeasterly 660 feet; thence northeast- 
erly 660 feet, for a military and naval 
cemetery, subject to any rights which said 
Board of Home Missions may have. 

Two hundred and fifty feet of land on each 
side of the stream of water running into 
Jamestown Bay, on the south side thereof, 
on Baranoff Island, now used for watering 
purposes by the U. S. Navy and mercan- 
tile vessels," for a wharf and such other- 
purposes as may be necessary for use of 
the U. S. Navy and mercantile marine; 
also all of that island situated directly 
opposite the town of Sitka, known as Ja- 
ponsky Island, for naval and military 
purposes. 
Fort St. Michael: 

St. Michael Island, and all other lands and 
islands within a radius of 10 miles of the 
flagstaff of the postof Fort st. Michael. 

a About. 



a 4. 00 



10.00 



(*>) 



(*) 



President's order, June 21. 1890. 



President's order .Tune 21, 1890. 



President's order. Oct. 27. 1900 



/' Area not known. 



136 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Names and locations of existing military reservations in the public-land Spates and Terri- 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office — Continued. 



Name and location of reservation. 



Area in 



Date of President's order or other 
authority, and remarks. 



alaska — continued. 

In the vicinity of Dyea: 

1. Beginning at a point about 200 yards north 

of thedockof theDyea Klondike Trans- 
portation Co.; thence northerly along 
the shore of Lynn Canal 2 mile<: thence 
westl mile; thence south 2 miles; thence 
east 1 mile to point of beginning. 

2. Beginning at point on shore of Lynn ('anal 

just north of where road from Haines 
Mission turn- westerly toward- Chilkat; 
thence southerly along coast line of 
Lynn Canal 2 miles; thence west 1 mile; 
thence northerly 2 miles; thence east 1 
mile to point of beginning. 

1. Beginning at northwest corner of -aid 

military reservation (corner 4of existing 
reservation); thence south 2,007 feet to 
corner 2on the east shore of Chilkat In- 
let: thence meandering along the said 
shore of the Chilkat Inlet s. 41 c W E. 
18.945 feet to corner 3: thence across the 
peninsula to the west shore of Lynn 
Canal, fast 7.300 feet, more or less to 
corner 4: thence meandering along the 
shore of Lynn Canal X. 41° 06' \V. 11.943 
feet, more or less, to corner 5 (corner 2 
of existing reservation); thence along 
the south boundary of said reservation 
west 5.280 feet to corner 6 I corner 3 of ex- 
isting reservation); thence along the 
west boundary of said reservation X.47° 
os' W. 10,560 feet to point of beginning. 

2. All the land within the following limits to 

secure a clay deposit for making roads 
on the reservation: Beginning at a post 
situated about 4,ii40 feet west of the ap- 
proach to the present wharf at Haines. 
Alaska: thence east 500 feet to corner 2: 
thence north 500 feet to corner 3: thence 
west 500 feet to corner 4: thence south 
500 feet to corner 1. the point of begin- 
ning. 
At junction of the Tanana and Yukon riwr-: 
Beginning at a post marked " D. 8. M. R.." 
situated on the north or right bank of the 
Yukon River, opposite the mouth of the 
Tanana River;thence ranningduenorth 
from -aid post 10 miles, thence due west 
10 mile-: thence due south to a point at 
low-watermark on the north bank of 
the Yukon River: the net- easterly along 
the north bank of said Yukon River at 
low-water mark to a point due south of 
said beginning post; thence north to 
the place of beginning. 
Fort Egbert: 

Commencing at a post at the mouth of Mis- 
sion Creek, marked "U. 8. M. R.:" 
thence due west 2 miles: thence due 
south 2 miles: thence due east 3 miles; 
thence due north to the left bank of the 
Yukon River; thence along the left bank 
of said river to the place of beginning. 
On recommendation contained in letter from 
the Secretary of War, so much of the penin- 
sula embracing Point Spencer a- lie- north of 
the southern boundary as hereinafter de- 
scribed was reserved for public purposes, viz: 
Commencing at the extreme north end of 
the peninsula embracing Point Spencer, 
shown by the General Land Office mapot 
Alaska. 1898, as being in approximate lat- 
itude 65° 17' X.. longitude 166 c 45' W. from 
Greenwich: thence to a point due south 
from Point Spencer, 2 mile- to a point 
east or west from the west >hore of Port 
Clarence Bay: thence to a point due east 
or west, as the case may be. to a point at 
low-water mark on the west shore of Port 



ol.280. 00 President's order, Dec. 31, 1898. 



"1.2-n. 00 



(&) 



President's order, Nov. 21. 1902. 



5.74 



c 64. 000. 00 Pre-idenfs order. July 10. 1899. 



(d) 



President's order. Jan. 25. 1904. 



(<*) 



President'.- order. Jan. 2 



a Estimated area. 
b Area not known. 



Courses and distances do not close within 15 chains 



c About. 

d Area not known. 



EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 13' 

Names and locations of existing military reservations in the public-land States and Tern 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office.— Continued. 



Name and location of reservation. 



alaska— continued. 

On recommendation contained in letter from 
the Secretary of War, etc.— Continued. 

Clarence Bay; thence due west, crossing 
said peninsula from the pointat low-water 
mark on the west shore of Port Clarence 
Bay, to a point at low-water mark on 
Bering Sea, the last-named course to con- 
stitute thesouthern boundary of the tract. 
Fort Liscum: 

Beginning at an iron post 2 inches in di- 
ameter, •"> feet long, driven 3 feet in the 
ground, marked " U. S. M. R. Post No. 1," 
which is near the center of a neck of 
land 24 feet wide, which connects Swan- 
port Peninsula with the mainland, and 
which isN. 67° 50' W., 26.50 chains distant 
from large rock about 12 by 12 by 14 feet 
above ground, standing in front of Fort 
Liscum, said iron post being situated at 
the initial point or northwest corner of 
the reservation as declared by said Exec- 
utive order of July 18, 1900; thence S. 
80° 30' E. to the shore, and following the 
shore line of Valdez Bay at low water in 
an easterly direction to a point on the 
shore N. 9° 30' E. from an iron post 2 inches 
in diameter, 5 feet long, marked " U. S.M. 
R. Post No. 2," placed 3 feet in the ground, 
on a bluff 30 feet above sea level; said post 
bearing S. 80° 30' E., 2 miles distant from 
post No. 1. the place of beginning, and 
west 6.50 chains from the mouth of Solo- 
mons Gulch Creek, said point being also 
the northeast corner of the original res- 
ervation as declared bv said Executive 
order of July 18, 1900; thence S. 9° 30' W., 
through said post and along the eastern 
boundary of the original reservation, 43.05 
chains from the said iron post No. 2 to cor- 
ner No. 3, which is an iron post 2 inches 
in diameter, 5 feet long, 3 feet in the 
ground, marked "U. S. M. R. Post No. 3:" 
thence N. 83° 20' W., 160.32 chains to cor- 
ner No. 4, which is an iron post 2 inches in 
diameter, 5 feet long, 3 feet in the ground, 
marked U. S. M. R. Post No. 4," said 
corner being situated on the western line 
of the original reservation as declared 
by said Executive order of July 18. 1900; 
thence N. 9° 30' E. along the original res- 
ervation 50.97 chains to corner No. 1, the 
place of beginning. 
A tract of land for military purposes, particu- 
larly as a site for a signal station and base of 
supply for Fort Liscum- Fort Egbert military 
telegraph line, viz: All that tract ot land sit- 
uate near the easterly shore of Valdez Bay, 
district of Alaska, bounded as follows: 
Beginning at a point on the northern bound- 
ary line of the present town of Valdez, 
situated, with respect to surrounding ob- 
jects, as described in a survey of said tract 
made by George E. Baldwin, U. S. deputy 
surveyor, in January, 1903; tin nee N. 
61° 27' E., along the present northern 
boundary of the town of Valdez, 261 feet, 
to corner No. 2: thence N. 28° 33' W., 92 
feet, to corner No. 3: thence S. 61° 27' W., 
261 feet, to corner No. 4; thence S. 28° 33' 
E., 92 feet, to corner No. 1, the place of 
beginning. 
A tract of land on Skagway River near Skagway, 
known as Survey No." 177, as surveyed by 
Alfred Williams, U. S. deputy surveyor, and 
shown upon a blueprint diagram accompany- 
ing the order, viz: 
Starting at station Kean, of the Coasl and 
Geodetic Survey, from winch station Garb, 
of same survey, bears S. 3°59'W.: thence 

"Area not known. 



Area in 
acres. 



(a) 



b 466. 12 



Date of President's order or other 
authority, and remarks. 



President's order,, Dec. 31, 1903. 



President's order, Mar. 10, 1903. 



President's order, May 21. 1903. 



& About 



138 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Names and locations of existing military reservations in the public-land States and Terri- 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office — Continued. 



Name and location of reservation. 



Alaska— continued . 

A tract of land on Skagway River near Skagway, 
known as Survey No. 177, etc.— Continued. 
N. 52° 05' E., 111.62 chains, to corner No. 1, 
the place of beginning; thence N. 47° 12' 
W., 80 chains, to corner No. 2; thence N. 
42° 48' E., 80 chains, to corner No. 3; thence 
S. 47° 11' E., 48.79 chains, to corner No. 4; 
thence S. 30° 03' W.. 32.81 chains, to corner 
No. 5; thence S. 46° 27' E., 0.37 chain, to 
corner No. 6; thence S. 43° 22' W., 36.03 
chains, to corner No. 7; thence S. 47° 12' 
E., 24.30 chains, to corner No. 8; thence S. 
44° 26' W., 11.96 chains, to corner No. 1, 
the place of beginning. Variation at all 
corners, 32° 30' E. The bearings are true. 

Total in Alaska, as far as known or esti- 
mated. 

ALABAMA. 

At entrance to Mobile Bay, the small islands 
between the north point of Dauphin Island 
and Cedar Point, Grant, Heron, Tower, and 
other islands, and so much of Cedar Point as 
lies in fractional sees. 25 and 26, T.8S..R.2W.: 

Cedar Point 

Fort Gaines, on eastern end of Dauphin 

Island 

Fort Morgan, in T. 9 S.. R. 1 E 

ALABAMA AND MISSISSIPPI. 

All of Ship Island, Hurricane, and Dog islands 
(Dog and Hurricane islands estimated at 100 
acres). 

Total in Alabama and Mississippi, as far 
as known. 



ARIZONA TERRITORY. 

Camp Apache, within the limits of the White 

Mountain Indian Reservation. 
Camp Grant (new), in Tps. 8, 9, and 10 S., Rs. 23 

and 24 E. 
Fort Huachuca, in southern Arizona, adjacent 

to Babacomari private land claims. 
Fort Whipple, in T. 14 N., R. 2 W 



Total in Arizona, so far as known 

ARKANSAS. 

Fort Smith National Cemeterv, in sec. 17, T. 8 IS . 
R. 32 W. 



Total in Arkansas 

CALIFORNIA. 

Angel Island, in San Francisco Bay 

Alcatraz Island, in San Francisco Bay 

Drum Barracks, at Wilmington Cal 

Benicia Barracks and Arsenal, in Tps. 2 and 3 N., 
Rs. 2 and 3 W. 

Deadman's Island, being lotl, sec. 19, T. 5S., R. 13 
W., San Bernardino meridian. 

Camp Gaston, in T. 8 N., R. 5 E., of Humboldt 
meridian, within Hoopa Valley Indian Reser- 
vation. 

Fort Hill or Monterey, at Monterey 

Island called Red Rock, Golden Rock, or Molate, 
in sec. 17, T. 1 N., R. 5 W., Mount Diablo me- 
ridian. 

Presidio Military Reserve, Fort Point, on San 
Francisco Bay. 



Area in 
acres. 



67, 7(>o. 75 



Date of President's order or other 
authoritv, and remarks. 



296. 50 President's order, Feb. 9, 1842. 
(«) Lands conveyed to the United States 

bv decree of chancery in Jan., 1853. 
(a) Secretary of War, Sept. 10, 1842. 



1,652.40 , President's order, Aug. 30, 1847. 



90 



7,421.14 President's order, Feb. 1, 187^ 
42,341.00 President's order, Apr. 17, 18" 



49,920.00 ! President's orders, Oct. 29, 1881, and 
May 14, 1883. 



1,730.00 



101,412.14 



14.81 



14.81 



President's orders, Aug. 31, 1869, and 
Oct. 19 J.875; act of Congress, ap- 
proved June 22, 1874 (18 Stat. L.,201). 



President's orders, Mav 22, 1871, and 
Dec. 3, 1876. (See act of Feb. 26, 
1897, 29 Stat. L., 596.) 



(&) 



2.00 



President's orders, Nov. 6, 1850, and 
Apr. 10, 1860. 

President's order, Nov. 6, 1850. 

Deeded to the United States by pri- 
vate parties. 

President's order, Oct. 10, 1862. Deed 
by private parties in 1849. 

President's order, Mar. 15, 1872. 



451.50 | President's order, Apr. 2, 1869. 



(«) j President's order, Nov. 23, 1866. 

7.52 Secretary of Interior, Mar. 2, 1858; 
President's order, Oct. 21, 1882. 

1,479.94 President's orders, Nov. 6, 1850, and 
Dec. 31, 1851: act of Congress, May 
9, 1876 (19 Stat. L., 52). 



a Area not known. 



&Area of island not known. 



c Unsurveyed. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 13 ( J 



Names and locations of existing military reservations in the public-land stairs and 
lories which appear of record in the General Land Office — Continued. 



Terri- 



Name and location of reservation. 



Area in 
acres. 



Date of President's order or other 

authority, and remarks. 



California— continued. 

Point San Jose (originally included within the 
Presidio Reserve No 1). 

Point Loma (San Diego), at San Diego Harbor: 
"To include that portion of the peninsula 
lying on west side of entrance to the harbor, 
which shall be included between thesouthern- 
most point of the peninsula (Punta de Loma) 
and a line drawn across said peninsula from 
the harbor to the ocean, at a distance of li 
miles above Punta de Guisanas." 

San Pedro Bay, in T. 5 S., Rs. 13 and 14 W., S. B. 
M. This tract of land was originally a public 
reservation by cession from Mexico under 
treaty of Gaudalupe-Hidalgo, concluded Feb. 
2, 1848. 

Sausalito Bay Point: From southern boundary 
of Sausalito Bay, a line parallel to the channel 
of entrance to the Pacific. 

Three Brothers, Three Sisters, and Marine 
islands, in entrance to the San Pablo Bay. 

Yerba Buena Island (Camp Reynolds), in San 
Francisco Bav. 



Total in California. 



North end of Amelia Island (Fort Clinch), frac- 
tional sec. 8, T. 3 N., R. 29 E.: fractional sec. 
11 and lots 1 and 2 of sec. 14, T. 3 N., R. 28 E. 

Fort McRae, near Pensacola, in T. 3 S., R. 31 W .: 
" All the public land within 1 mile of the fort 
on Fosters Bank." 

North Key, in Tps. 15 and 16 S., R. 12 E 

Snake Key, in T. 16 S., R. 13 E 

Mullet Key, in T. 33 S., R. 16 E 

At Charlotte Harbor: "The south end of Gas- 
parilla Island for a distance of 2 miles from its 
southern extremity, in T. 43 S., R. 20 E., and 
the north end of Boca Grande or Cayo Costa 
Island for a length of 2 miles from its northern 
extremity," in T. 43 S., R. 20 E., and T. 44 S., 
Rs. 20 and 21 E. 

Dry Tortugas (including Fort Jefferson) 

Egmont Island, at entrance to Tampa Bay, in 
T. 33 S., R. 15 E. 

Flag Island, in St. George Sound 



Mantanzas Inlet or Fort, in sec. 14, T. 9 S., R. 30 E. 

Fort Barrancas in fractional sees. 2, 3, 4, and 5, 
T. 3 S., R. 30 W., and fractional sees. 1, 3, 16, 
27, and unsurveyed lands south of fractional 
sees. 16 and 27 and north and east of claim of 
Joaquin Barilla in T. 3 S., R. 31 W. 



Anastasia Island. 



Fort Pickens, all of Santa Rosa Island 



At St. Andrew Sound: "The tongue or neck of 
land called Crooked Island, east of the several 
entrances along the coast." 

oArea not known. 
■ b About. 
cArea not stated. 



(«) 



M0. 00 



(d) 
(a) 



2, 438. 75 



419. 44 



159. 48 
52.17 

842. 29 



2, 143. 



./ 392. 



( e ) 
2, 500. 



(a) 



(«) 
(«) 



President's orders, Nov. 6. 1850, and 
Dec. 31, 1851: act of Congress, July 
1. 1870 (16 Stat. L., 186). 

President's order, Feb. 26. 1852. 



President's order. Sept. 1 1. 1888. 



President's order, Nov. 6, L850. 



President's order, Oct. 25, 1867. 

President's orders, Nov. 6, 1850, and 
Oct. 12, 1866. 



Declared by President'- order, Feb. 9. 

1842. Lot 2 of see. ii patented to 

D. L. Yulee, Sept, 5, 1853. 
President's order, Feb. 9, 1842. 



'President's order, Mar. 2. 1840; order 
of Secretary of War, Mar. 23. 1849. 
Originally reserved as a part of 
Cedar Keys, although Mullet Key 
is not one of the Cedar Keys, but is 

I at the entrance of Tampa Bay. 

Secretary of War. Mar. 2:;. L849; Presi- 
dent's order, Nov. 17, 1882. 



President's order, Sept. 17. 1845. 

Secretary of War. Mar.23, L849; Execu- 
tive order. Nov. 17. 1882. 

Secretary of War. Mar. 23,1849; Execu- 
tive order. Nov. 17. 1882. 

Secretary of War, Mar. 2:;. 1849. 

Included in limits of naval reserva- 
tion per act of Congress approved 
Apr. 22, 1*26. and declared bj Presi- 
dent's order dated Jan. 10, 1838. 
President's order, May 11, 1844, 
transferred 1.667 acres to military 
authorities, and by President's 
orders dated May 21. L888, and Oct. 
2. 1891, boundaries were enlarged 
by. transferring suffici< nt land to 
form present area. 

President's order, May I. 1893, re- 
serves SE. j sec 21, all fractional 
sec. 22. NE. \ NE. \ sec. 28, and all 
sec. 27 in T. 7 S.. R. 30 E., Florida; 
also all the lands formed by the sea 
since survey, 1855, lyingeasl of said 
lands and between the north bound- 
ary line prolonged of said SE ! of 
sec. 21. and thesouth boundary line 
prolonged of said sec. 27. 

Land deeded to the United states 
May 28, 1828; President's order, 
July 2, 1888. 

Secretary of War. Mar. 2::. 1849. 



dUnsurveyed; area not known. 
'-Area of island not known. 
1 Presenl area not known. 



140 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Names and locations of existing military reservations in the public-land States and Terri- 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office — Continued." 



Name and location of reservation. 



Area in 
acres. 



Date of President's order or other 
authority, and remarks. 



Florida — continued. 

At St. Andrews Bay: Lots 1 and 2, sec. 4; lots 1, 
2, 3, and 4, sec." 5; lots 1 and 2, sec. 6, and 
fractional sees. 8 and 9, T. 5 S., R. 14 W., in- 
cluding Hurricane Island, as shown upon 
Coast Survey Chart No. 184; also lots 2 and 3, 
sec. 15; lots 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, sec. 22; lots 1, 2, 3, 
and 4, sec. 23; lot 2. sec. 25; lots 1, 2, and 3, 
sec. 26, and fractional sees. 27 and 35, T. 4 S., 
R. 15 W. 

At St. Augustine the following-named tracts: 
1. Site of Fort Marion and adjacent lands.. 

5. Spanish governor's house 

6. Treasury lot 

8. St. Francis barracks and grounds 

9. Military hospital lot 

10. Powder house lot 

11. Two small islands in the Matanzas River, 

St. Augustine Harbor. 

At St. Joseph Bay: "The whole neck or penin- 
sula forming the bay of St. Joseph from its 
northern extremity, or Point St. Joseph, to its 
connection with the mainland at the eastern 
shore of the bav, including Cape San Bias," 
in T. 9 S., R. 11 W., and Ts. 7, 8, and 9 S., R. 
12 W. 

Santa Rosa Sound: " So much of the point oppo- 
site to and east of the east end of Santa Rosa 
Island as lies in T. 2 S., R. 22 W." 

Santa Rosa Island: All that portion of Santa 
Rosa Island which was formerly a naval re- 
serve and relinquished to the Department of 
the Interior, Feb. 25, 1880, the same attached 
to and made a part of Fort Pickens Military 
Reservation, and embracing the entire area of 
Santa Rosa Island. 

Key West, or Thompson Island 



a 1,483. 84 



( b ) 



Key West Shoals, SW. point of Key West 

Haulover Canal, 1,000 feet each side from the 
center, in sec. 29, T. 20 S., R. 36 E. 



Lot 2, sec. 4; lots 1 and 2, sec. 9, T. 3 S., R. 29 W., 
and fractional sec. 1, T. 3 S., R. 30 W., Florida. 



Total in Florida as far 
mated. 

IDAHO. 



known or esti- 



Fort Boise, in Boise Valley, one-half mile from 
Boise City. 

Fort Hall, within the Fort Hall Indian Reser- 
vation, in T. 3 N., R. 38 E. 

Total in Idaho 



Fort Armstrong (Rock Island), in fractional 
T. 18 N., Rs. 1 and 2 W., fourth principal me- 
ridian. 



Maple Island (within limits of two surveyed 
islands), in sees. 19 and 30, T. 5 N., R. 9 W., 
third principal meridian, in the Mississippi 
River, reserved in connection with the recti- 
fication and improvement of the channel of 
the river. 

Total in Illinois a*s far as known or esti- 
mated. 



( b ) 
3, 851. 21 



5, 958. 20 



Unsurveyed. 



(«) 



(a) 



270. 39 



18,073.17 



638.00 
646. 50 



1, 284. 50 



a 750. 00 



(a) 



c 750. 00 



President's order, May 3, 1897. 



Secretary of War, Oct, 12, 1838, and 
Mar. 23, 1849. 



President's order, May 31, 1892. 

Secretary of War, Mar. 23, 1849, be- 
sides what had been sold prior to 
date of order. 



President's order, Feb. 9, 1842. 
President's order, July 2, 1888. 



Land said to have been deeded to the 
United States. Key covered by pri- 
vate land claim, confirmed by Con- 
gress in 1828. (See act of July 22, 
1876. 19 Stat. L., 96.) 

President's order, Sept. 17, 1845. 

President's orders, Aug. 20, 1886, and 
Feb. 11, 1897, reserves all lands 
owned by Government on Key 
West, Virginia Key, and Key Bis- 
cayne. 

President's order, Aug. 21, 1897. 



President's order, Apr. 9, 1873. 
President's order, Oct. 12, 1870. 



Request of Secretary of War, Mar. 2, 
1825, and Sept. 11, 1835. By act of 
Congress approved June 27, 1866 
( 14 Stat. L. , 75) , certain small islands 
were added to the reserve and right 
of wav was granted to the Rock 
Island' R. R. Co. Act of Apr. 2, 1844 
(6 Stat. L., 908), allowed George 
Davenport to enter the SE. i sec. 25, 
T. 18 N., R. 2 W. 

President's order, June 13, 1896. 



a Estimated area. 



b Area not known. 



c About. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 141 

Names and locations of existing military reservations in the public-land States and Terri- 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office — Continued. 



Name and location of reservation. 



Fort Leavenworth, on west bank of Missouri 
River, in T. 8 S., R. 22 E. 



Fort Riley, in Ts. 11 and 12 S., Rs. 5 and 6 E. 



Total in Kansas. 



LOUISIANA. 

Battery Bienvenue, in T. 12 S., R. 13 E., east of 
river; "The public lands, 1,200 yards each way 
from the fort." 

Fort Livingston, on west end of Grand Terre 
Island. 

Fort Jackson, sec. 50, T. 20 S., R. 30 E., southeast 
district, west of Mississippi River. 

Fort Pike, consisting of " the public lands with- 
in 1,200 yards of Fort Pike." 



Fort St. Philip, sec. 11, T. 19 S., R., 17 E., south 

east district, east of river. 
Tower Dupres: "All the public lands within 

1,200 yards of the fort," in T. 13 S., R. 11 E., 

east of Mississippi River. 
Fort Macomb, on Pass Chef Menteur: "All the 

public lands within 1,200 yards from the fort.' 



Proctor Landing, on Lake Borgne 

United States barracks and land adjoining and 
above same, near New Orleans, on left bank 
Mississippi River, about 3 miles above city. 

Baton Rouge Arsenal, adjoining Baton Rouge. 



Total in Louisiana, 
estimated. 



as far as known or 



MICHIGAN. 

First area between south boundaries of claims 
Nos. 95 and 96 and north boundary of canal 
grant in T. 47 N., R. 1 E.; second area between 
north line of Canal street and south boundary 
canal grant shown in diagram with order. 

St. Marys Falls Canal Reserve, in sec. 6, T. 47 N., 
R. IE. 

Improvement of Hay Lake Channel, St. Marys 
River, lots 5 and 6, sec. 2; and lot 3, sec. 3, T. 
45 N., R. 2 E. 



Fort Brady. 



Area in 



a 2, 750. 00 



b 19, 899. 22 



( c ) 

126. 16 
740. 97 
( c ) 



556. 12 
(d) 

( c ) 
a 92. 00 



1,515.25 



9.41 



145. 



2, 573. 10 



Date of President's order or other 
authority, and remarks. 



President's order, Oct. 10, 1854. Di- 
minished by direction of Secretary 
of the Interior in 1861. See also act 
of July 27, 1868 (15 Stat. L., 238); 
joint resolution Feb. 9. 1871 (16 Stat. 
L., 594); act of July 20, 1868 (15 Stat. 
L., 392). 

President's order, May 5, 1855. Re- 
duced in area under joint resolu- 
tion of July 26, 1866 (14 Stat. L., 367), 
and order of President thereunder 
of July 19, 1867. Further reduced 
under act of Mar. 2, 1867 (14 Stat. 
L., 573). 



President's order, Feb. 9, 1842. 



Purchased by United States in Janu- 
ary, 1834. 
President's order, Feb. 9. 1842. 

President's order, Feb. 9, 1842. All the 
land has been patented to the State 
as swamp, except sec. 19 of T. 10 S., 
R. 15 E., southeast district, east of 
river and south of Great Kigolet. 
Area of reserve in sec. l9not known. 

President's order, Feb. 9, 1842. 

President's order, Feb. 9, 1842. Lands 
found to be covered by a private 
land claim. 

President's order, Feb. 9, 1842. (See 
Executive order June 20, 1896, re- 
linquishing part of Fort Macomb.) 

Purchased Mar. 15, L856. 

Purchased by United States. Dec. li. 
1833, and May 17. L848. 



Purchased in 1814 



President's order, May 9. 1885. 



President's order, June 10. 1882. 

President's order. Oct. 3u, 1884. Exec- 
utive order, Oct. 12, 1889, reserves 
islands Nos. 1, 2. 3, and i, in sec ti. 
T. 47 N., R. l E., tor use m connec- 
tion with improvement of St. Marys 
River at Hay Lake Channel. 

President's order, Jan. 19, 1895, re- 
serves following tracts tor ritle 
range and other military purposes 
in connection with post of Fori 
Brady: X..'. NW. h SW. 1 NW. t.aiid 
W. .'. SW. I sec. 5, E. .'. and E. IW.j 
sec. 6, N. I NE. j and NE. ; NW. ; 
sec. 7. T. 45 N.. i; 1 W.; s. ! NW. \. 
N. i sw. :. and SE. | SW. i sec. 28, 
s. !. N. i and s. ; sec. 29, s. \ . 
E. I SW. i, and SE. } sec 30, S. i 
NE. I and E. .'. NW. j see. 31, \Y. j 
and NW. j NE. j sec. 32, T. 16 N.. 
K. 4 W.; s. | N. j sec. 25, T. 16 N., R. 
5 W. 



« Approximate present area. 



b About. 



'■Area not known. 



</ Area not stated. 



142 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Names and locations of existing military reservations in the pvblic-land States and Terri- 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office — Continued. 



Name and location of reservation. 


Area in 
acres. 


Date of President's order or other 
authority, and remarks. 


Michigan— continued. 

The unsurveved islands in sees. 9 and 10, T. 47 
N., R. IE. 


(«) 

(&) 


Secretary of the Interior, Sept. 5, 1885. 
President's order, Sept, 22, 1885. 




June 3, 1842, and Apr. 15, 1844. 


Total in Michigan, as far as known 


2,728.41 




MINNESOTA. 

Port Snelling, at junction of Mississippi and 
Minnesota rivers. 

Reservation on St. Louis River, in Minnesota, 
lot 1, sec. 20, T. 49 N., R. 13 W. 


(6) 

7.32 


Reservation made at the request of 
Secretary of War, July 13, 1839, and 
Secretary of Treasury, July 15, 1839. 
President's orders, dated May 25, 
1853, and Nov. 16, 1853. Act of Con- 
gress approved Aug. 26, 1852 ( 10 Stat. 
L., 36), and order of Secretary of 
War thereunder, dated Mar. 13, 1854. 
Joint resolution of Congress ap- 
proved May 7, 1870 (16 Stat. L.,376). 
Reduction approved by Secretary of 
War, Jan. 1, 1874. 

President's order, Mar. 13, 1854. 


Total in Minnesota, except Fort Snelling. . 


7.32 




MISSOURI. 

Grand Tower Rock, in Mississippi River, which, 
if surveyed, would be in sec. 20, T. 34 N., R,, 14 
E. of fifth principal meridian. 

Fort Leavenworth, on east bank of Missouri 
River, in Ts. 52 and 53 N., R. 36 W. of fifth 
principal meridian. 

S. | SE. i and 3E. ± NE. ± sec. 15, and the NW. £ 
NE. | sec. 22, T. 33 N., R. 4 E. fifth principal 
meridian, Missouri, reserved as a target range 
for use of troops stationed at Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Mo. 


( b ) 
c 1,000. 00 
160. 00 


President's order, Feb. 24, 1871. 

President's order, June 21, 1838. Por- 
tion of reserve released by Secre- 
tary of War Mar. 1, 1841. Present 
reserve is in R. 36 W. 

President's order, Sept, 19, 1898. 


Total in Missouri, as far as known or esti- 
mated. 


1,160.00 




MONTANA. 

Camp Baker, in T. UN., R. 4 E 


2, 400. 00 
e 57, 619. 00 

dl68,640.00 

640. 00 
560. 23 

1, 577. 41 
640. 00 


President's order, Mav 16, 1871. 




President's order, Mar. 14, 1878. Gen- 


Fort Assi n nil >< >ine, mostly between the Milk and 
Missouri rivers, and within the reservation 
for the Gros Ventre, Piegan, and other In- 
dians. 
Fort Missoula: 

Original reserve: Sec. 31, T. 13 N., R. 19 W... 

Additional reserve: S. i NE. £ and SE. £ sec. 

25, T. 13 N., R. 20 W.,"the S. * NE. J, S. i 

NW. i, SE. a of SE. 1, NE. ± of SW. £, and 

W. i of SW. k, sec. 30, T. 13 N., R. 19 W. 

Timber reserve on unsurveved land 


eral Orders. No. 6, Headquarters 
Department of Dakota, Feb. 18,1880, 
describes the ferry or bridge site on 
east bank of river. 
President's orders, Mar. 4, 1880, June 
16, 1881. 

President's order, Feb. 19, 1877. 
President's order, Aug. 5, 1878. 

President's order, June 10, 1879. 


National cemetery of Custer's battlefield 


President's order, Dec. 7, 1886. 


Total in Montana, as far as known or esti- 
mated. 


232, 056. 84 




NEBRASKA. 

Fort McPherson National Cemetery 


107. 00 

12,800.00 
10, 240. 00 


President's orders, Oct. 13, 1873, and 


Camp Robinson, on White River, at mouth of 
Spring Creek: 
Post reserve 


Jan. 5, 1887. 
President's orders, Nov. 14, 1876, and 


Timber reserve, 4 miles square 


June 28, 1879. 
President's order, Nov. 4, 1879. 



a Area not stated. 



b Area not known. 



c About. 



d Estimated. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 143 

Names and locations of existing military reservations in (he public-land States and Terri- 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office — Continued. 



Name and location of reservation. 



Nebraska — continued. 

Fort Niobrara: 

Post reserve: Sees. 26 and 35 of T. 34 N.,secs. 
2, 3, 10, 11, T. 33 N., and all that part of sees 
22, 23, 27. 33, and 34 of T. 34 N., and of sees. 
4, 5, 8, 9.T.33 N., lying on the right (south 
and east) bank of Niobrara River, all in R. 
27 W., of the sixth principal meridian. 

Wood and timber reserve: All that part of 
T. 34 N., R. 27 W., not already embraced 
within the existing reservation, excepting 
sees. 16 and 36 (school sections); tbeNE.^ 
of NE. i sec. 28: the N W. ± of NW. ± and 
lots 2 and 3 of sec. 27: the NE. ± of SW. I, 
the W. iof SW. i. and lot 3 of sec. 22: the 
E. i of SE. i and S. a of NE. j of sec 25; 
the E. i of NW. i. the E. § of SW. ±. and 
lots 1, 2, 3, and 4 of sec. 31. and the NE. j 
of sec. 3:i. 

In T. 34 N., R. 26 W., all of sees. 5, 6, 7, 8, 17 
18, 29. 31, and 32; all of sec. 19, except lots 2, 
3, 4, and 5; all of see. 20, except the N. iof 
SE. i, and lots 5, 0, 7, and 8, and all of sec. 
30, except the E. | of NW. \ and lots 1 and 
2. In T. 39 N., R. 26 W., all of sees. F\ 6, 7, 
and 8. In T. 33 N., R. 27 W., all of sees. 1 
and 12. 

(To the above was added the E. | of SE. i 
and S. i of NE. a sec. 25, T. 34 N., R. 27 W., 
and at the same time there was excluded 
the W. | of SE. i and S. i of SW. a of sec. 
30 of the same township and range.) 



Restored to control of Secretary of the Inte- 
rior 720 acres of Fort Niobrara Military 
Reservation, embracing the NW. ± sec. 29, 
NE. i and E. i SE. i sec. 30, and S. i sec. 31, 
T. 34 N., R. 27 W r ., Nebraska, for disposal 
under act of July 5, 1884. 

Total in Nebraska 

NEW MEXICO. 

Fort Bayard, in T. 17 S., Rs. 12 and 13 W 

Fort Sumner Post Cemeterv, situated in NE. i 
sec. 15 and NW. i sec. 14, T. 2 N., R. 26 E.: 

These two subdivisions contain 

Fort Union falls within the confirmed private 
land grant Mora: 

Post and timber reserve 

Fort Wingate, in Tps. 13, 14, and 15 N., Rs. 15, 16, 
and 17 W. 

Total in New Mexico 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Lot 11, sec. 34, T. 138 N., R. 80 W., fifth principal 

meridian. 
Lot 13, sec. 34, T. 138 N., R. 80 W., as an addition 

to Fort Lincoln. 



Total in North Dakota 



Sand Island, in sees. 14, 23, and 24, T. 9N. R. 11 W 

Point Adams i Fort Stevens), inT. 10 N., R. 10 W.; 

fractional sees. 5and6and N. x sees. 7, 8, and 9. 

For improvement of Coos Ba v and Harbor: Lots 
1, 2, 3, and the SW. i of NW. j of Sec. 2, and 
lots 1 and 2 and SE. i of NE. £ of sec. 3, T. 26 
S., R. 14 W. 



Area in 
acres. 



5, 474. 84 



28, *! 7. I s 



439. 32 
720. 00 



56,719.32 



, 840. 00 
320. 00 



66, 880. 00 
83, 200. 00 



8.00 
39.40 



192.07 
1,250. 11 



174.27 



Date of President's order or other 
authority, and remarks. 



President's order. Dec. 10, 1879. 



President's order, June 6, 1881. 



President's order, Apr. 29, 1884. 



President's order, May 7, 1896. 



President's order, Apr. 19 1869. 
President's order, May 22. L871. 



President's order. Oct. 9. l.M's. 
President's orders, Feb. 18, 1870. and 
Mar. 26, 1881. 



/President's order. May 17, 1899. 

{President's order. Aug. 31, L899. 

President's order. June 8, 1901. 



President's order. Aug. 29, L863. 

President's order, Feb. 26, L852. Ado 
nation claim covers some 100 acres 
of the reservation. 

President's order, July 1 1, L884. Presi- 
dent's order, Nov. 13, L889, reserves 

parts Of sees. 27 and 31 and parts of 
32; sec. 33 and part of 34, all ID T.21 
S.. R. 13 \\\: parts of sees. 1 and 5; 
sec. 6; parts of sees. 7. 18, and 19, T. 
25 N.. R. 13 W.; parts of sees. 12, 13, 
and 23, and parts of 24, 26, and 26, 
T. 25 S., R. H W. 



144 EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Names and locations of eocisting military reservations in the public-land State* and Terri- 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office — Continued. 



Name and location of reservation. 



Oregon — continued. 
For improvement of Coos Bay and Harbor, etc. 



North side of Tillamook Head, fractional SW. £ 
sec. 29, lots 1 and 2 of sec. 30, and lots 1, 2, 3, 
and 4 of sec. 31, T. 6 N., R. 10 W. 

Total in Oregon as far as estimated 

OKLAHOMA. 

Fort Reno, in Tps. 12 and 13 N., R. 8 W., Indian 

meridian. 
Fort Sill wood reserve, in Ts. 1 and 2 N., Rs. 8 

and 9 W., Indian meridian. 

Post reserve ( unsurveyed) 

Post reserve (surveyed) 

Total in Oklahoma 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

Fort Meade: 

Post reserve in Ts. 5 and 6 N., R. 4 E., Black 
Hills meridian. 

Timber reservation as follows: Sees. 19, 30, 
31, S. I sec. 18, and W. | of sec. 20, T.5N., 
R. 5 E.; E. | of sees. 24 and 25, and SE. i of 
sec. 13, T. 5 N., R. 4 E., Black Hills merid- 
ian. 



Total in South Dakota as far as known 
or estimated. 

UTAH. 

Fort Douglas, in Tps. 1 N. and 1S..R.1E 



Reservation for water supply for Fort Douglas . 



Do 



Fort Du Chesne, in T. 2 S., R. 1 E., Uinta merid- 
ian, within the Uinta Indian Reservation. 

Total in Utah (estimated) : 



WASHINGTON. 

Port Angeles and Ediz Hook, in Ts. 30 and 31 N. 
Rs. 5 and 6 W. 



a About. 



Area in 
acres. 



327. 55 



1,944.00 


« 9, 493. 00 


23, 228. 96 


23, 040. 00 
26, 736. 00 


82, 497. 96 



7, 840. 00 
3, 344. 83 



11,184.83 



2, 388. 19 



208. 56 



3, 840. 00 



8,356.75 



(*>) 



Date of President's order or other 
authority, and remarks. 



President's order, Dec. 19, 1899, re- 
stores to public domain for disposal 
so much of land reserved by Presi- 
dent's order of Nov. 13, 1889, de- 
scribed as part of sec. 3 and sees. 4 
and 9, and parts of sees. 10 and 15; 
sees, 16, 17, and 20: parts of sees. 21, 
22, 28, and 29, T. 48 S., R. 13 W. 

President's order, Nov. 4, 1885. 



President's order, July 17, 1883. 

President's orders, June 4, 1892, and 

Mar. 11, 1901. 
President's order, Oct. 7. 1871. 
President's order, Feb. 26, 1897. 



President's order, Dec. 18, 1878. 

President's order, Apr. 18, 1881. Ex- 
ecutive order, Sept. 16, 1889, enlarg- 
ing the wood and timber reserva- 
tions as per boundaries described 
in letter of Secretary of War, dated 
Sept. 14, 1889. See also President's 
order, May 27, 1885. 



President's order, Sept. 3, 1867. Act 
of Congress, May 16, 1874 (18 Stat. L., 
46), gave 20 acres for cemetery for 
Salt Lake religious bodies; act of 
Jan. 21, 1885 (23 Stat. L., 285), re- 
duced reserve 151.81 acres. 

Act Mar. 3, 1887 (24Stat. L., 478), added 
to reserve for water supply. Presi- 
dent's order, Mar. 13, 1890, withdraws 
for use of Fort Douglas, subject to 
rights of the U. P. R. R. Co., which 
have attached to odd-numbered sec- 
tions, sees. 13 and 23, T. 1 N., R. 1 E. ; 
sec. 17; N. isec. 18, and E. ± sec. 20, T. 
1 N., R. 2 E., with exception of SE. 
i SE. a sec. 20, T. 1 N., R. 2 E., Salt 
Lake meridian, Utah. Estimated 
area outside of land embraced in 
adjustment list of Central Pacific 
R. R. Co., which includes sees. 13 
and 23, T. 1 N., R. 1 E., and sec. 17, 
T.1N..R. 2 E., Utah 600 acres. 

President's order, June 8, 1896, re- 
serves SW. i sec. 26: NE. ± NE. a and 
lot 1, sec. 34, T. 1 N., R. 1 E., Utah, 
for use of Fort Douglas. 

President's order, Sept. 1, 1887. 



President's orders, July 19, 1862, and 
Mar. 10, 1863. President's order, May 
15. 1893, reserves blocks Nos. 32 and 
53 within town site at Port Angeles 
for customs-service use. 

^Area not known. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 145 

Names and locations of existing military reservations in the public-land States and Terri- 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office — Continued. 



Name and location of reservation. 



Area in 
acres. 



Date of President's order or other 
authority, and remarks. 



Washington— continued. 

Canoe Island, off east coast of Shaw Island 

Cape Daigppointment, including Fort Canby, 

fractional section 9 (except lot 4, reserved for 

light-house purposes), and part of fractional 

sections 4 and 5, T. 9 N., R. 11 W. 
Southwest part of Lopez Island, including 

Bunch Island and Whale Rocks. 
Northwest part of Lopez Island, extending from 

Flat Point to Upright Point. These reserves 

are in Ts. 34, 35, and 36 N., R. 2 W. 

At Neah Harbor, strait of Juan de Fuca: 

1. Wa-addah Island 

2. Tract east side of harbor , 

3. Tract west side of harbor 

At Narrows of Puget Sound: 

1. South end of Vashons Island 

All in Ts. 21 and 22 N., R. 2 E. 

San Juan Island: 

Southeast point of island, including Goose 

Island and Rocky Peninsula, in T. 34 N., 

R. 2 W. 
Northeast point of island, including Reed 

Rock (in sees. 1, 2, 11, 12, and 13, T.35N., 

R. 3 W.). 

Shaw Island: 

West end of island, mostly in T. 36 N., R. 2 W. 
Eastern reserve on island, mostlv in T. 36 N., 

R.2 W. 
Fort Three Tree Point, inT.9N.,R.7W .... 
Fort Vancouver, in T. 2 N., R. 1 E 



Fort Walla Walla, part of the post reserve 
remaining unsold. 

Fort Spokane, on Spokane River 



Fort Townscnd. in sees. 21,22, 27, 28, and 33, 
T.30N., R.l W. 



Lot 9, sec. 22, T. 9 N., R. 10 W., reserved in 

connection with existing reservation at 

Chinook Point, also known as Scarborough 

Head or Hill. 

Reservations as follows at points where the title 

should be found to be in the United States, viz: 

1. On north side ot New Dungeness Harbor, 

embracingall the peninsula to its junc- 
tion with the mainland, in T. 31 N., R. 
4W. 

2. South side of New Dungeness Harbor, in 

T.31 N., Rs.3and4 W. 

3. On west side of entrance to Washington 

Harbor, in T. 30 N., R.3 W. 

4. East side of entrance to Washington Har- 

bor, T.30N., R.3W. 

5. Clallam Point, T. 30 N., R. 2 W 

6. Opposite Clallam Point, in T.30N.,Rs. 1 

and 2 W. 

7. Protection Island, in Ts.30and 31 X., K. 

2 W. 

8. Opposite Protection Island, in T. 30 N., R. 

1 W. 

9. Vancouver Point, in Ts. 29 and 30 N., R. 

2 W. 

10. Point Wilson, in T.31 X., R. 1 W 

11. Point Hudson, in T. 30 N., R. 1 W 



43.10 

536. 20 



599. 30 
634. 60 



« 29. 00 
« 400. 00 
a 400. 00 

633. 60 



640. 00 
508. 33 



515.30 
594.90 



640.00 

639. 54 



619. 57 
640. 00 
621. 97 

33.00 



258. 63 

628.00 

614. 00 

b 404. 00 

614.00 
637.00 

624.25 

603.00 
464.00 



President's order. July 2. L875, 
President's order. Feb. 26, 1852. 



President's order. July 2. 1^7.".. 



President's order. June 9, 1868. A part 
of these Lands declared reserved 
were disposed of prior to late of or- 
der reserving same, viz: XW. \ of 
SW. j and lot :;. sec. 1. T. 21 X.. R.2 
E.; lot 5 and NE. ; of BE. j sec. 2, T. 

21 X.. R.2 E., and SW. \ of SW. \ of 
sec. 33, T.22 X.. K.2E. 
President's order, July 2,1875. Presi- 
dent's order dated Mar. 2 and May 
20, 1889, amended President's order 
of July 2, 1875, confining the mili- 
tary reservation on San .luan Island 
to certain lots and subdivisions in 
sees. 7 and 8, in T. 31 X.. Rs. 2 and 
3 W.. making an aggregate of 640 
acres. 



President's order, July 2,1875. 

President's order, Julv 31, 1865. 

Order of Secretary of War, Oct. 29, 1853. 
President's order, .Ian. 5, 1878 (A 6 b 
of an acre was granted to Catholic 
mission). 

President's order. May 13, 1859. Hay 
and timber reserve granted away 
or sold. 

Order of Secretarv of Interior, June 
24, 1881. President's order, Jan. 12, 
1882; President s order, Nov. 17,1887. 

President's order. Apr. 30, 1896, re- 
vokes order of Apr. 1, 1895. trans- 
ferring the reservation declared by 
President's order of Jan. 29, 1859, to 
the control of the Secretary of the 
Interior for disposal, and again re- 
serves the land. 

President'^ order, May 8, 1899. 



•President's order. Sept. 22, 1866. 

All disposed oi before order issued. 

■President'- ord< i. Sept. 22, L866 

All disposed of bei er issued. 



About. 



b Excluding lands embracedin donation claimof George B.Gerrish.per President's order, Jan. 9,1893. 
8970—04 10 



146 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Names and locations of existing military reservations in the public-land States and Terri- 
tories which appear of record in the General Land Office — Continued. 



Name and location of reservation. 



Washington— continued. 

Reservations as follows at points where the title 
should be found to be in the United States, 
viz : — Continued . 

12. Admiralty Head, in T. 31 N., R. 1. E.... 

13. Marrowstone Point, in T. 30 N., Rs. 1 E. 

and 1 W. 

By Executive order, Nov. 14, 1896 

N. i of SW. i sec. 17, and that part of lot 
6 of sec. 18, T.30 N..R.1E., W. M., not 
already embraced in the reservation 
as per Executive order of Sept. 22, 
1866, was reserved in connection with 
Marrowstone Point Reservation. 

14. North of entrance to Deception Pass, 

including two islands in the pass, in 
T.34N., R. 1 E. 

15. South entrance to the pass, in T. 34 N., 

R. 2E. 

16. Two islands east of Deception Pass, in 

T. 34 N., R. 2 E. 

17. Tala Point, in T. 28 N., R. 1 E 

18. Hoods Head, in T. 28 N., R. 1 E 

19. Foulweather Point, in T. 28 N., Rs. 1 and 

2E 

20. Double Bluffs, fractional sees. 26, 27, 28, 

and lots 4 and 5, sec. 22 of T. 29 N., R, 
2E. 

21. Point Defiance, in T. 21 N., R. 2 E 

25. Whidbeys Island, most northerly point, 

in T. 34 N.. Rs. 1 and 2 E. 
Goose Island, situate in the Strait of Juan de 

Fuca, off the southeastern part of San Juan 

Island, in the SE. | of the NE. i of sec. 8, T. 

24 N., R. 2 W. 
On N. side of entrance to Gig Harbor, lots 5 and 

6, sec. 5, and lot 1, sec. 8, T. 21 N., R. 2 E. 



Total in Washington ... 

WISCONSIN. 



Stone quarry, fractional sees. 25, 26, and 36, T. 28 
N., R. 25 E. 



WYOMING. 

Fort D. A. Russell, adjoining city of Chevenne, 
inT.14N., R.67 W. 
Wood reserves for Forts Sanders, D. A. Rus- 
sell, and Chevenne depot, sees. 20, 28, 30, 
32, T. 15 N., R. 71 W. 
Crow Creek Forest Reserve, in Ts. 14 and 15 
N., Rs. 71 and 72 W., transferred to con- 
trol of War Department as a military res- 
ervation. 



Fort Fred. Steele National Cemetery 



Fort Washakie, within the Shoshone Indian 
Reservation. 
In T. 56 N., R. 84 W., sees. 7 and 8; the NW. 

i and the W. i NE. | sec. 17; lots 1, 2, and 

3, and E. ± NW. \ and NE. i SW. \ sec. 18; 

the SW. i of the NW. \ and W. i SW. i sec. 

20. Lot 1 and NE. ± of N. W. | and NW. 

i NE. i sec. 30, and lots 2 and 3, sec. 31. 
In T. 56 N., R. 85 W., the W. i sec. 1. All of 

sees. 2, 11, 12. 13, and all of sec. 14, except 

the S. | SE. i thereof. 
E. a sec. 16, T. 56 N., R. 84 W 



Total in Wyoming 

Total area of military reservations in the 
public-land States and Territories, as far 
as known or estimated. 



Area in 
acres. 



450. 00 
590. 00 



550. 00 

630. 00 

140.00 

615. 25 
614. 25 
602. 20 

626. 25 



631.00 
602. 00 



81.80 



19, 770. 04 



1,046.10 



4,512.00 
o2,540.64 



56, 132. 96 



M. 405. 00 



5, 493. 78 



320. 00 



82, 135. 16 



Date of President's order or other 
authority, and remarks. 



876,687.62 



President's order, Sept 22, 1866. This 
order declared reservations of 640 
acres each where the title to the 
lands shouldbe found in the United 
States, but upon final designation 
of the reservation by the War De- 
partment the areas were reduced 
below 640 acres, as per this table. 
Quite anumber of legal subdivisions 
within the limits designated were 
found to have been disposed of prior 
to date of order, which reduces the 
area reserved below the figures here 
stated. Exact reserved area not 
calculated. 



See preceding remarks. 
President's order, Jan. 9, 1889. 

President's order, Apr. 3, 1901. 



Request of Secretary of War and or- 
der of Secretary of the Treasury, 
Sept. 1, 1S37. 

President's order, June 28, 1869. 

President's orders, Nov. 4, 1879, and 
Feb. 25, 1880. 

President's order, Oct, 9, 1903. This 
reservation includes sees. 20, 28, 30, 
and 32 T. 15 N., R. 71 W. (2,540.60 
acres), reserved by President's or- 
ders of Nov. 4, 1879, and Feb. 25, 1880, 
as a wood and timber reservation in 
connection with Forts Sanders, D. A. 
Russell, and Cheyenne depot. 

Secretary of War, Nov. 19, 1886. Area 
not known. 

President's order, May 21, 1887. 



President's orders, Nov. 2, 1898, and 
Dec. 13, 1898. 



General orders, No. 92, Aug. 7, 1902, 
Adjutant-General's Office, War De- 
partment. 



a Estimated area. 



b About. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 147 
GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS. 

The following are the general instructions issued to surveyors- 
general for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904, the instructions to 
the surveyor-general of Utah being taken as an example: 

'By the act of Congress approved March 3, 1903, making appropriations for sundry 
civil expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904 (Laws 
1902-3, p. 1116), there was appropriated: 

"For surveys and resurveys of public lands, four hundred thousand dollars, at 
rates not exceeding nine dollars per linear mile for standard and meander lines, 
seven dollars for township, and five dollars for section lines: Provided, That in 
expending this appropriation preference shall be given, first, in favor of surveying 
townships occupied, in whole or in part, by actual settlers, and of lauds granted to 
the States by the acts approved February twenty-sixth, eighteen hundred and titty- 
seven, and May eleventh, eighteen hundred and fifty-eight, the act approved Feb- 
ruary twenty-second, eighteen hundred and eighty-nine, and the acts approved July 
third and July tenth, eighteen hundred and ninety, and, second., to surveying under 
such other acts as provide for land grants to the several States, except railroad land 
grants and such indemnity lands as the several States may be entitled to in lieu of 
lands granted them for educational and other purposes which may have been sold or 
included in some reservation or otherwise disposed of, and other surveys shall be 
confined to lands adapted to agriculture and lines of reservations, except in the case 
of forest reservations and lands within boundaries of forest reservations, except that 
the Commissioner of the General Land Office may allow, for the survey and resurvey 
of lands heavily timbered, mountainous, or covered with dense undergrowth, rates 
not exceeding thirteen dollars per linear mile for standard and meander lines, eleven 
dollars for township, and seven dollars for section lines, and in cases of exceptional 
difficulties in the surveys where the work can not be contracted for at these rates 
compensation for surveys and resurveys may be allowed by the said Commis- 
sioner, with the approval of the Secretary of the Interior, at rates not exceed- 
ing eighteen dollars per linear mile for standard and meander lines, fifteen 
dollars for township, and twelve dollars for section lines: Provided further, That 
in the States of California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Wash- 
ington, Wyoming, the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico, and the district 
of Alaska there may be allowed, in the discretion of the Secretary of the Interior, 
for the survey and resurvey of lands heavily timbered, mountainous, or cov- 
ered with dense undergrowth, rates not exceeding twenty-live dollars per 
linear mile for standard and meander lines, twenty-three dollars for township, 
and twenty dollars for section lines, the provisions of section twenty-four hundred 
and eleven, Revised Statutes of the United States, authorizing allowance for surveys in 
California and Oregon are hereby extended to all of the above-named States and 
Territories and district. And of the sum hereby appropriated there may be expended 
such an amount as the Commissioner of the General Land Office may deem neces- 
sary for examination of public surveys in the several surveying districts, by such 
competent surveyors as the Secretary of the Interior may select, or by such compe- 
tent surveyors as he may authorize the surveyor-general to select, at such compensa- 
tion not exceeding six dollars per day, and such per diem allowance in lieu of 
subsistence not exceeding three dollars, while engaged in field examinations, as he 
may prescribe, said per diem allowance to be also made to such clerks who are com- 
petent surveyors who may be detailed, to make field examinations in order to test 
the accuracy of the work in the field, and to prevent payment for fraudulent and 
imperfect surveys returned by deputy surveyors, and for examinations of surveys 
heretofore made* and reported to be defective or fraudulent, and inspecting mineral 
deposits, coal fields, and timber districts, and for making by such competent survey- 
ors fragmentary surveys and such other surveys or examinations as may he required 
for identification of lands for purposes of evidence in any suit or proceeding in 
behalf of the United States." 

Deducting from the $400,000 appropriated the sum of $80,000 set aside lor exami- 
nations in the field, there remains available tor apportionment among the several 
surveying districts the sum of $320,000. 

From the *320,000 available there is hereby apportioned to the district oi I tab 
the sum of $16,000. 

The fund set aside for examinations will be retained under the control of this 
Office and expended for the maintenance of a corps of competent examiners of sur- 
veys, who will be detailed according to the exigencies of the service in the several 
surveying districts. Employees of this Office, who are competent and experienced 



148 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

public land surveyors, will also be detailed to make examinations in the several sur- 
veying districts whenever such a course is necessary in order to expedite the work in 
this branch of the service. It is the intention of this Office to have all examinations 
in the field made by regular examiners of surveys, or office employees detailed for 
the purpose, except where exigencies arise, making this course impracticable. 

The said act of March 3, 1903, making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of 
the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904, also appropriates: 

"For survey of private land claims in the States of Colorado, Nevada, Wyoming, 
and Utah, and in the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico, confirmed under the 
provisions of the act of Congress entitled ' An act to establish a court of private 
land claims, and to provide for the settlement of private land claims in certain States 
and Territories,' approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and for 
the resurvey of such private land claims heretofore confirmed as may be deemed 
necessary, ten thousand dollars, said sum to be also available for office work on such 
surveys and for the examination of the surveys in the field." 

The annual instructions issued under date of August 13, 1902, for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1903, were full and explicit, and the surveying rates for the fiscal 
year 1901 being the same as for the fiscal year 1903, the said instructions of August 
13, 1902, are hereby made applicable to the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904, and you 
will be governed accordingly. 

Please acknowledge receipt. 

Very respectfully, W. A. Richards, 

( 'ommissioner. 



REPORT OF J. FRANK WARNER, EXAMINER OF SURVEYS, ON CONDITIONS 
OF THE PUBLIC LAND SURVEYING SERVICE IN THE DISTRICT OF 
ALASKA. 

Cheyenne, Wyo., January 11, 1904. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith the following reports on conditions in 
Alaska in accordance with your letter dated May 8, 1903: 
Establishment of a true meridian at Sitka, Alaska. 
Inspection of United States surveyor-general's office at Sitka, Alaska. 
General description of lands in Alaska. 
Copper River Valley. 
Coal mines near Chignic, Alaska. 
Town sites. 

Examination of instruments used by United States deputy surveyors in Alaska. 
Surveying in Alaska. 

Tracts of land recommended for surveys in Alaska. 
Very respectfully, 

J. Frank Warner, 
Examiner of Surveys. 
The Commissioner of the General Land Office, 

Washington, D. C. 

ESTABLISHMENT OF A TRUE MERIDIAN AT SITKA, ALASKA. 

[For use in testing the alignment of instruments used by United States deputy surveyors in that Ter- 
ritory in connection with the United States surveyor-general's office.] 

Having been directed by the United States surveyor-general to the point on a rock 
in Sitka where instruments were tested, the bearings to the several well-defined 
objects being furnished me, I proceed to verify the bearings as follows: 

At a point on a solid face of granite about 20 feet surface and situated about 350 
links north of the Presbyterian Church, marked by a cross - 1 - and the letters U.S.I.M., 
I set my transit over this point and verify the adjustments, the line of collimation, 
height of standards, levels, and opposite verniers all being in perfect adjustment. 
The instrument is a Leitz light mountain transit, horizontal plates reading by opposite 
verniers to single minutes, which is the least count on the vertical circle, plates and 
circle 4 inches in diameter, needle 2f inches long, variation plate and long reversible 
graduated bubble under the telescope. 

Instrument was tested by peg method to determine if the bubble underneath the 
telescope would run a level line and coincide with the vernier of the vertical circle, 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 149 

also provided with a prism for observations at great altitudes. Instrument found to 
be in perfect adjustment. 

June 3, 1903, at the point 350 links north of the Presbyterian Church in Sitka, at 
ll h 58 m a. m., 1. m. t, lat. 57° 02' 40", long. 134° 59' 40", I observe the sun on the 
meridian by direct observation, the altitude of the highest point being, 

55° 13' 00" corrected for refraction 40". 
40 subtract. 



55 12 20 true altitude of sun's center. 
90 00 00 
55 12 20 



34 47 40 co-alt. 

22 15 00 sun's deck for June 3, 1903, at noon. 



57 02 40 N. latitude of station in Sitka. 

June 3, 1903, at 5 h p. m., 1. m. t,, I observe the sun by direct observation; that is ; 
bisect the sun's center. 

Altitude. Pyramid Peak. 

No. 1. 25° 11' turn from sun 97° 41' to left. True course S. 5° 05 / E. 

No. 2. 24 35 turn from sun 98 35 to left. True course S. 5 03 E. 

No. 3. 24 01 turn from sun 99 27 to left. True course S. 5 05 E. 

No. 4. 23 19 turn from sun 100 31 to left, True course S. 5 05 E. 

Calculation for observation No. 1. 
Observed altitude 25° 11' 

2 refraction; subtract. 



25 09 true alt, 

90° 00 / 00" 

25 09 00 true alt. 



64 51 00 co-alt. 

32° 57' 20" co-lat.=A. C. 0.264410 

64 51 00 co-alt. =A. C. 0.043256 

67 43 25 co-deck 9. 996527 =sin. 82° 45' 52". 



1 165 31 45 9. 413938=sin. 15 02 2', 



\2 45 52 212 



67 43 25 2)19.718343 



15 02 27 9. 859171 =co-sin. 43° 42' 



Should turn 87° 24' from sun to be north. 87 24. 



180° 00' 
97 41 turned from sun to left, 



82 19 

87° 24' 
82 19 



S. 5 05 E. to Pyramid Peak, 
magnetic declination 29° 35' E. 



150 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

June 4, at 7 h a. m. l.m.t., I observe the sun by direct observation — that is, bisect 
the sun's center. 

Altitude. Pyramid Peak. 

No. 1. 29° 44 / turn from sun 80° 33' to right. True course S. 5° 05' E. 

No. 2. 30 42 turn from sun 79 03* to right. True course S. 5 04£ E. 

No. 3. 31 14 turn from sun 78 11 to right. True course S. 5 05 E. 

Calculation for observation No. 2. 
Observed altitude, 29° 44 / 00" 

1 38 refraction; subtract. 



29 42 22 true alt. 



90° 00' 00" 

29 42 22 true alt. 



60 17 38 co-alt 

32° 57' 20" co-lat. = A. C. 0. 264410 

60 17 38 co-alt. = A. C. 0.061192 

67 39 00 co-decl. 9. 993939= sin. 80° 26' 59" 



2) 160 53 58 9. 345469= sin. 12 47 59 

2) 19.665010 



80 26 59 

67 39 00 9.832505: 



12 47 59 



Should turn 94° 18' from sun to be north. 94° 18' 

180° 00' 
183 33 angle turned from sun. 



99 27 
94 18 



S. 5 05 E. to Pyramid Peak. 

With the instrument clamped at 5° 05' and directed to Pyramid Peak; this 
throws the zero of the instrument in the true meridian: 

Mount Vestovia bears N. 77° 42' E. 

Cross on Greek Church bears S. 77° 33' E. 

Northwest corner of United States barracks bears S. 40° 50 / E., 375 links 
distant. 

Northeast corner of Presbyterian Church bears S. 30° 46' E., 250 links distant. 

Northwest corner of governor's house bears S. 18° 31' W. 

To island in Pacific Ocean, 10 miles distant, bears S. 44° 15 / W. 
Bearings as furnished by surveyor-general: 

Mount Vestovia bears N. 78° E. 

Cross on Greek Church bears S. 71° 15 / E. 

Northwest corner of United States barracks bears S. 40° 32 / E. 

Northeast corner of Presbyterian Church bears S. 31° 12' E. 

Northwest corner of governor's house bears S. 18° 46 / W. 
After these observations were made I was directed by the observer of magnetic 
declinations, stationed at Sitka, to a meridian established by the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, which is a brass peg set in concrete and marked on the top with a cross -f-, 
in front of the Presbyterian Church, buried about 8 inches deep from the surface of 
the street for the south end, and by an iron rod driven firmly in the ground for the 
north. In order to check my observations, I transit a line from my meridian. Run 
N. 57° E. to the iron peg, from which the brass peg in front of the Presbyterian 
Church bears south. 

On Sunday night, June 7, 1903, I observe Polaris at 10 h 58 m p. m. by my watch, 
which is correct 1. m. t. for long. 135 W., making watch l m 20 s fast for longitude of 
Sitka. 



KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 151 

Eastern elongation comes at 2 h 25'" 25 8 on Monday morning, June 8. 
10 h 58 ,u 00 s p. m. time of observation bv watch. 
1 20 watch fast. 



10 h 56 m 40 s p. m. time of observation. 

12 h 00 m 00* 
10 56 40 



1 03 20 

2 25 25 a. m. time E. elongation June 8. 



28 m 45 s or 3 u 28.7? 
15° 



52° ll'=co-sin. 61314X133' 
133 



81.54762 minutes =1° 22'. 
1° 22' azimuth to be turned to the west, where I mark the meridian. 
Pyramid Peak bears S. 5° 05 / E. 

The bearings to these objects from my point on the granite rock were furnished 
the surveyor-general's office and the two points of the meridian marked by the Coast 
and Geodetic Survey were also shown the surveyor-general. 

On June 6, 1903, I made an inspection of the office of the surveyor-general of 
Alaska. 

The office is situated in Sitka in a frame building, fronting on the main street, on 
the second floor, consisting of five rooms, viz, surveyor-general's private office, chief 
of mineral division's room, record room, general storage room, draftsman's room. 
The rooms are of good size, well lighted, and well furnished. 

Employees in surveyor-generaV s office. — Chief of mineral division, stenographer in 
same room, chief draftsman. 

All accounts of the office are kept by a system of double-entry bookkeeping, com- 
prising a journal, ledger, and cash book, and a register of applications for mineral and 
non-mineral surveys. 

The correspondence, plats, and field notes are all filed and properly indexed. 

After a thorough inspection of the office, covering a period of several days, in secur- 
ing data for examination of surveys in different sections of Alaska, I find the office 
to be well conducted and to compare favorably with any other office visited in the 
United States. 

The surveyor-general is the head of his force, fully conversant with the general 
business and has a knowledge of all business transacted. This office on steamer days 
is also a bureau for general information relating to the land laws and interests of 
Alaska in general. 

The surveyor-general and force employed are courteous and obliging, and the office 
systematically conducted and arranged. There w r ere some articles of furniture 
needed. The surveyor-general's requisition including these articles has been hon- 
ored since my visit. I have no recommendations to make. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF LANDS IX ALASKA. 

Baranof Island. — Along the route of the steamship the Island of Baranof rises from 
the sea in mountains covered with a heavy growth of spruce timber, undergrowth 
and moss, fallen timber covered with moss, and young trees growing out of decayed 
fallen logs. It is most exceptionally difficult to survey, as a line would have to be 
cut entirely through the brush and it would be difficult to find any ground firm 
enough to hold a peg for sighting purposes, as well as impracticable to set a transit 
firmly. The moss and decayed timber are shaky, being about the only kind of soil. 
The country above timber line, which is estimated at 2,000 feet, is covered with 
snow, except where a creek drains to the ocean. Where timber grows along each 
side it is very slow and exceptionally difficult to survey. 

Chicago/ L land. 1 — -Lies north of Baranof Island; is heavily timbered, rising steep 
from the sea, but not to such great elevation as Baranof. le deeply cut by inlets, 
bays, and streams. The timber and undergrowth are terrific as viewed from a Bur- 



152 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

veying standpoint. It is rough and it would be very difficult to get measurements by 
chaining. Only a few peaks rise 500 feet above the timber line. Snow does not lie 
so deeply as on Baranof Island. 

Admiralty Island. — Is still lower than the other two islands, and as far as general 
topography is concerned it could be surveyed, the land not being so steep but more 
rolling; that is, the land viewed from Chatham Straits extending inland probably 6 
miles. The snow had nearly disappeared, or enough so that at this time it could be 
surveyed north of Killisnoo, but south of this town it is similar to Baranof. Along 
the strait, looking east, can be seen a range of mountains rising above timber line, 
covered with snow. 

Kodiak Island. — Kodiak Island is mountainous in the interior. The east half of 
the island is timbered, the we3t half no timber at all. This island could be surveyed 
at the maximum rates. 

Chignic. — The land along the east shore of the peninsula is mountainous, and could 
be surveyed at the maximum rates. There is no timber and very little undergrowth. 
The mountains are not the most difficult to survey. 

Cold Bay. — The land in this vicinity on the west shore of the Shelikoff Straits is 
mountainous, with no timber. It is supposed to be an immense coal-oil field, and 
considerable prospecting has been done this summer. The country has been plas- 
tered with location notices. This country could be surveyed at the maximum rates. 

That portion of Alaska lying east of Kodiak Island, along the coast, is of such 
character, viz, mountainous, dense undergrowth, cliffs, boggy, together with thick 
weather, that it can not be subdivided under the rules of the present Manual of 
Surveying, for the following reasons: 

First. The contract prices per mile allowed are inadequate. 

Second". Solar instruments are useless. 

Third. The land can not be measured with the 66-foot chain, by leveling it and 
dropping the pins. 

About $50 per mile should be allowed. Transit lines should be run. Steel tapes 
500 feet long and stadia measurements should be employed. 

Copper Hirer Valley. — On Sunday, June 28, 1903, 1 left Valdez over the military trail 
leading up Lowe River. Trail in bad condition; a horse plunging and lunging to 
keep from miring down. In the winter the trail used is lower down along the 
bottoms of Lowe River; high waters cover the lowlands most of the summer 
months. This bottom along Lowe River is gravel wash in the river channel, which 
in some places is a mile wide; that part covered with cottonwood timber and dense 
alder undergrowth is alluvial, cold and wet. At a point about 12 miles from Valdez 
the trail leaves the river and crosses over a steep mountain to avoid a canyon, but 
descends to the valley about 6 miles farther on, where it enters cottonwood timber 
again. Reached Wortman's ranch in the afternoon. 

The land, with the exception of the bottom land, would be exceptionally difficult 
to survey, owing to its steep mountainous character and being covered with dense 
undergrowth. 

Left Wortman's at 7 a, m. June 29; began ascent of Thomson Pass, grade easy, 
saddle trail crossing pass at an elevation of 2,400 feet. Arrived at Tiekell road ranch 
at 10 p. m. ; distance, 30 miles. Trail in bad condition. 

The land along the trail is covered with a .poor quality of spruce timber, and is 
nearly all covered with dense undergrowth. A mountainous country of the worst 
possible description viewed from a surveying standpoint. 

Left Tiekell at 7 a. m. June 30; arrived at Ernestine at 1 p. m. Traveled through 
burned spruce timber nearly all the way. The valley through which the trail fol- 
lows is narrow and poorly timbered. The mountains are steep and high, but not so 
precipitous as the country near Thomson Pass and north. 

July 1. Left Ernestine at 6 a. m. and traveled over a valley, well grassed, which 
bears northwest from the road ranch. There is very little timber in the valley, 
which is about 3 miles wide, probably 12 miles long, the first land seen that is avail- 
able for pasture land. Thence over the Kimball Pass, where the trail runs by easy 
grades through dense undergrowth and mire holes. At a point on the trail about 7 J 
miles from Tonsina I leave the mountainous character of the country, prevalent the 
whole distance from Valdez, and enter on a high mesa, sloping gradually toward the 
north. This is the Copper River Valley, and a good view is obtained looking north 
of this country. This mesa is covered with dead poles and dense undergrowth. The 
land is nearly level except where the rivers and creeks have cut down. The banks 
or sides of the canyons, showing the white clay, are about three to four hundred 
feet high. The valleys are narrow and covered with dense undergrowth and cotton- 
wood timber. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 153 

July 2. Heavy rain and hail storm flooding the country and rendering travel on 
the trail nearly impossible. Left Tonsina on foot in a northerly direction and toward 
the point where the initial monument of the base line will be established. After 
climbing out of the Tonsina Valley the country is flat and of the same general 
character as on the south side. I made inquiries of people who have been over or 
near the line where the principal meridian will run, and from the descriptions given 
me of the country from the initial point on Burnt Mountain to Copper Center it is 
identical with the description of the land around Tonsina; that is, after descending 
on the flat it is covered with spruce timber and dense undergrowth. The line 
will cross Klutena River near Copper Center, following the bottoms of Copper River 
in dense undergrowth and cottonwood timber, crossing Copper River three times, 
thence ascending over bench land about 400 feet above river and of the same general 
character as bench in the valley, all in dense undergrowth. Crossing Copper River 
onto the west side again, some parts of the upper valley are open country, rank grass 
growing in the parks mixed with chaparral brush and also covered with moss. 

Running east from the end of the 72-mile point on the third standard parallel north 
the line will pass over broken foothills and flats 3 or 4 miles wide, thence over ends 
of spurs six or eight hundred feet high, descending to flats. Spurs heavily timbered; 
flats covered with dense undergrowth. 

From the end of 36 miles on the third standard parallel north the country north 
over which the line will run is practically unknowm except as viewed from a dis- 
tance. It is a high, rugged, and snow-covered range. I am informed that the last 
30 miles of the line will lie in a valley after crossing the high range of mountains. 

As this valley has been reported an agricultural section capable of sustaining an 
immense population, it may not be out of place to mention some of the features 
noticed. The lower bottoms along the rivers have some protected fertile spots, which 
will undoubtedly be settled upon by those who will rely on the travel to the mines 
for their market; but the immense tracts of bench lands, lying between the rivers are 
a moss-covered, cold, wet, boggy country and it is very doubtful if any race of agri- 
cultural people could ever coax a living from the soil. Of one thing I am certain — no 
farmer of the United States would ever attempt the cultivation of these bench lands 
after once seeing them. 

A trip over the trail, wallowing through bog holes lined with rocks, stumps, logs, 
and mud to a horse's flank, crossing snow bridges, spanning raging glacial streams, 
fording deep rivers, shows that a very few farmers would ever get their families into 
the country. 

COAL MIXES NEAR CHIGNIK, ALASKA. 

In 1899 two veins of bituminous coal were located by C. J. Brown, of Chignik, 
Alaska, and others, situated about one mile and a half west of survey No. 589, on 
the Chignik Lagoon, about midway between Homer and Dutch Harbor. The upper 
vein is 6 feet in thickness, and the lower vein 5 feet with 1 foot of slate intervening, 
the whole being capped by sandstone. The coal is of good quality. It is only used 
for household use, none being sold. 

The same parties also discovered in 1896 two veins of coal in Hook Bay, 12 miles 
north of Anchorage Bay. The veins, which are 5 and 6 feet in thickness, capped by 
sandstone, are located 5 miles from tidewater, and croppings can be traced for one- 
quarter of a mile. The coal is of better quality. 

The Alaska Packers' Association have a coal mine located on the north or left 
bank of the Chignik River, which is navigable for boats drawing only 3 or 4 feet of 
water, about 7 miles above their cannery, situated on Chignik Lagoon. The lower 
vein is 14 to 18 inches thick, and a tunnel has been run in a distance of 500 feet. 
The tunnel on the upper vein, which is 2 to 3 feet thick, is 400 feet in length. The 
coal is bituminous, of good quality. 

The output is the work of 2 men for six months and 4 men for the other six, 
the amount mined being about 500 tons yearly, of which amount possibly 75 tons 
are sold to straggling steamers, the price being $14 per ton, the remainder being 
used for cannery purposes and on small tugs and other boats used about their can- 
nery. The mine has been worked for nine years. 

TOWX SITES. 

The application for the survey of the town site of Valdez, Alaska, was withheld on 
a statement of two persons claiming residence in Yaldez and stating that the S. A. H. 
claims were in conflict with the town site, and resulting in the cancellation of the 
S. A. II . claims. The land embraced in the town-site survey is without a single con- 



154 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

flict of any description. The north line of the town-site survey is about 3 feet south 
of the line claimed by the military authorities for the cantonment. There is no 
conflict with the cantonment reservation and the town site. 

In 1898 the military landed at Valdez and established a cantonment. Afterwards 
recommending to the War Department two suitable locations for a permanent mili- 
tary post, Fort Liscum, about 3 miles south," on the opposite side of Valdez Bay, was 
recommended as one of these locations and was made by the President's order of 
July 23, 1900, a military post and reservation. 

On April 19, 1898, the military set a post at the southwest corner of the canton- 
ment, describing by magnetic courses and distance the land claimed as a military 
reservation, on the northwest side of the present site of Valdez, embracing 1 mile 
square. The land was not surveyed, a single line being blazed on the south side of 
the so-called reservation. This line has since been recognized as such boundary. 

Without doubt the military has exercised control by actual occupancy of a tract of 
land about 400 feet square, erecting rough log cabins and stables, also a corrugated- 
iron-covered telegraph station, near the southwest corner. They also exercised 
police control in keeping off the reservation a certain undesirable class of people. 
But that the military authorities did not object to people residing on the reservation 
is a fact, as there was prior to 1901 at least six persons living on the land in peaceful 
possession. Nor could there have been objection by the military to the location and 
survey of the S. A. H. claims. These claims were begun in February, 1901, posting 
prior notice and surveyed August, 1901. 

The first residence was erected by Von Gunther in 1898 on the S. A. H. claim, No. 
336, which he has cultivated, fenced, and improved by continual residence since that 
date. 

On July 25, 1902, the military caused to be posted a notice declaring the reserva- 
tion to be open or abandoned, afterwards posting the following notice on the tele- 
graph station: 

' ' Notice to the public. 

"Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of War has transferred and released to 
the Department of "Justice for public buildings and grounds all that part of the mili- 
tary reservation at Valdez not reserved by the War Department. All persons are 
warned against going upon or trespassing upon any of these grounds, and trespassers 
will promptly be ejected therefrom. 

"Geo. G. Perry, 

" United States Marshal. 
"By Deputy Charles Dreibellis, 

"Deputy United States Marshal.'' 1 

This notice reserves by the War Department the land on which the telegraph 
station stands. 

In August, 1902, knowledge that the S. A. H. claims on the reservation had been 
canceled, caused a grand rush for town lots to be made over the S. A. H. claims and 
other lands on the reserve. At present date, July 1, 1903, there are 166 residences or 
claim shacks on these grounds and many more in course of construction. 

It is evident that this land was not a military reservation as it requires a procla- 
mation by the President to make it such. If it is to be considered a military reser- 
vation then it can only be abandonded by an act of Congress. 

As the S. A. H. claims have recently been reopened I submit these facts for your 
consideration, together with affidavits of some of the claimants. 

The city council of Valdez has taken steps preparatory for an amended survey of 
their town site, which will include other grounds than those in the first survey. 

HOMER TOWN SITE. 

Homer consists of 25 buildings, constructed by a defunct coal-mining company. 
The former company made the application for the survey for the purpose of showing 
up the development of the company. There is no call for a survey of the town site; 
the place is practically deserted — one man living at the place, agent for the Cook 
Inlet Coal Fields Company. The place consists of 25 buildings, all in good condi- 
tion, a wharf in a damaged condition, and a railroad to the mine 7 miles west. Roll- 
ing stock in sight on track, 10 loaded cars, with 100 sacks of coal lying on the wharf. 
No mining except development work, and repairing of track being done. The man- 
ager of the company is Alfred Ray, 226 Bourse Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 155 

Applications for surveys of town sites coming under my notice which have been 
dropped and no action taken to perfect their titles are not due to any defect in the 
laws governing such surveys. 

The town of Homer is deserted, as is the case at Dyea. 

No complaint at Valdez was heard in regard to any hardships due to existing town- 
site laws. Since their application was filed two other town sites have been surveyed 
near the present location, each offering inducement for the terminal of the proposed 
railroad to the Copper River country. The final location of the terminal of the rail- 
road has been looked upon by the residents of Valdez as being the proper place for 
their town site. They have been unsettled heretofore and not willing to incur any 
further cost until the location of the railroad was established. The town has improved 
and grown to such dimensions that the matter has been lately taken up and steps 
taken to go ahead and have an amended survey made and carried to a finality. I 
have no recommendation to make on any change or amendments to the existing laws 
governing town-site surveys. 

EXAMINATION OF INSTRUMENTS. 

The instruments examined in Alaska, belonging to the United States deputy sur- 
veyors, were in most cases of a class and condition to perform any kind of surveying. 

Keujfel cfe Esser light mountain engineer's transit No. 3900. — The horizontal plates 
read by opposite verniers to single minutes, which is the least count of the full verti- 
cal circle; prismatic eyepiece; Saegmuller solar attachment; no variation plate. 
Instrument in fine condition, belonging to Deputy George E. Baldwin, Valdez, 
Alaska. 

Leitz light mountain transit. — Horizontal plates read by opposite verniers to single 
minutes which is the least count of the vertical circle. Saegmuller solar attachment ; 
32-inch needle. Variation plate read by vernier to single minutes. In fine condi- 
tion; belongs to Alfred D. Lewis, Valdez, Alaska. 

Buff and Berger No. 2869 light mountain transit. — Horizontal plates read by opposite 
verniers to single minutes which is the least count of the vertical circle; no varia- 
tion arc; telescope provided with stadia wires; also Buff and Berger prism for eye- 
piece. In good condition, belonging to Lauritz E. Davick, Valdez, Alaska. 

IT. and L. E. Gurley light mountain transit. — Horizontal plates read by opposite 
verniers to single minutes, which is the least count of the vertical arc. Variation 
arc. Stadia wires in telescope; no prism. In good condition. 

Sala light mountain transit. — Horizontal plates read by opposite verniers to single 
minutes which is the least count of the vertical circle. Variation arc. Stadia w r ires 
in telescope; no prism. In good condition, belonging to George W. Garside, Juneau, 
Alaska. 

. SURVEYING. 

The examination of mineral and non-mineral surveys in Alaska, and the erroneous 
alignment found in nearly every survey, has led me to believe that all surveys 
examined were run from a meridian established by a needle course. 

The magnetic declination (variation) being taken from the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey Charts. 

There are several good reasons why the regulations in the Manual of Surveying 
governing the surveys in the United States can not be made to apply to Alaska: First, 
it is daylight at midnight; another is the thick cloudy weather which obscures the 
star Polaris; another is that Polaris being at a great altitude, only an instrument in 
perfect adjustment would give the true meridian from an observation on the star at 
such an altitude and in a country covered with moss, rendering it impracticable 
to keep a transit level at night. 

It is a well-known fact that even in cloudy weather the sun can occasionally be 
seen at intervals long enough to obtain a solar observation when an observation on 
Polaris would be impracticable. A solar apparatus is absolutely unreliable unless 
checked by a. m. and p. m. observations on a true meridian. The only method that 
I can recommend by which a true meridian in Alaska can be obtained is by direct 
observation on the sun, and requiring the deputy to use it in determining his meri- 
dian instead of the method now in use in the manual, together with information 
that an examiner from the General Land Office will hereafter inspect surveys before 
being accepted. 

This method will require some practice, but with a transit provided with a vertical 
circle in good adjustment, reversing the telescope at each observation, and preferably 



156 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

taking the observation with the sun at an angle of about 15° or 20° elevation, the 
true meridian may be obtained to the nearest minute. 

A surveyor who can not master this method of determining a meridian will not 
do good work by any other. This method applies to the summer season when it is 
daylight at midnight. Perhaps during the winter months the Polaris observation will 
be more practicable, as at that season it will be dark nearly all day. 

In our travels over Alaska only two surveyors were met who were familiar with 
the direct-observation method. All others expressed a desire to become acquainted 
with it, and were given the formula and solution. 

Pamphlets illustrating the method of obtaining the true meridian and local mean 
time by direct observation on the sun, forwarded to the United States surveyor- 
general at Sitka, Alaska, for distribution among the deputies, would be highly 
appreciated and of great benefit to the service. 

CUTTING OUT THE LINES OF SURVEYS. 

The portion of Alaska lying east of a meridional line running through Kodiak 
Island is covered with heavy timber and dense undergrowth. The undergrowth is 
so dense and tangled that it is impossible to run accurate lines without cutting out a 
clear line. To avoid the expense of cutting out this line nearly all of the surveys 
near Valdez have been run in the winter season when the snow lies to a depth of 
twelve feet, covering the brush; therefore no axe marks on the brush or trees are 
shown on these surveyed lines. To examine the work the examiner is required to 
cut out the lines for the applicant of the survey, deputy surveyors ignoring the 
manual requirement of blazing lines and lopping brush. To examine surveys of this 
description would correct this method of surveying. 

CORNERING. 

I would recommend that in case of a corner being identical or common to four non- 
mineral surveys that the stone first set be marked as such and the deputy be not 
required to set four corners or stones in the same point, which is impracticable. Also 
the practice of requiring a stone corner to be set should be discontinued. There is 
no agricultural land in Alaska that is more valuable than that in the United States 
where wooden posts are in use to mark the boundaries. Also, a post set in Alaska 
will not decay for an indefinite length of time, owing to the fact that it becomes 
water seasoned, the weather is not warm enough for decay to advance rapidly; in 
fact, post corners will outlast similar corners that are used in the survey of the public 
lands of the States, with a positive guaranty against fire. It is a great hardship on 
the applicants of Alaska to be required to ship stone corners from Seattle to Alaska 
to meet these requirements. This was done last summer, as we saw the corner stones 
on board the steamship Excelsior billed from Seattle to Resurrection Bay. The stones 
available for corners in many of the surveys examined were transported a distance 
of 12 miles by boat, thence by dog teams, w T hen post material was in abundance on 
the ground, which would have made a better corner than the stone used. Owing to 
the shape and brittle condition of stones available, it is nearly impracticable to mark 
them so that the description can be read. 

MEANDER CORNERS. 

Another noticeable defect in the non-mineral surveys, facing on the shore or navi- 
gable rivers 3 chains wide, w T a,s the absence of meander corners. These corners set at 
ordinary high-water mark w r ere not set for meander corners and not marked MC, 
according to the manual of surveying, and in nearly every instance the meander 
corner was not set at all, but a witness corner set somewdiere on the line of the survey, 
practically leaving the tract unsurveyed. The meander corner 3hould be set at ordi- 
nary high-water mark, marked MC. Should it be deemed unsafe, then a witness 
corner set at a point on safe ground and marked WC MC, but in every case the 
meander corner should be set at the true point. In all my observations a meander 
corner set at ordinary high- water mark in Alaska is as safe and permanent as a 
meander corner in any other country, and a legal corner is as important in a survey 
of Alaska lands as anywhere and should hereafter be required. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 157 

TRACTS OF LAND RECOMMENDED FOR SURVEYS. 

The tract of coal land north from Kayak on the north side of Controllers Bay, 
embracing the valleys of the Catella and Chilcat rivers, is heavily timbered, marshy 
land; is underlaid by a tine body of coal, and should be subdivided. It will be neces- 
sary to establish a base line of 12 miles and a principal meridian of 12 miles. Prob- 
ably as good a location as could be selected for the initial monument would be at a 
point about one-half mile northwest of Chilcat Lake, extending the meridian south 
to Controllers Bay and the base line 12 miles east from initial monument. 

Kodialc Island. — Kodiak Town has a population of about 300 people, consisting 
of a few whites, Russians, Creoles, and natives. This town is nearly 100 years old. 
The inhabitants are engaged in agricultural pursuits and deserve to have title to 
the lands. The country that is settled is facing the Pacific Ocean on the east side 
of the island, on English Bay, Middle Bay, and Calsencisk Bay, about 18 miles south 
from Kodiak, which would include this settlement. 

Seivard Peninsula. — Immense bodies of coal underlie this tract of land, which can 
be seen breaking and falling into the ocean for miles along the coast. This land, if 
subdivided, would be located. 

Yakutat. — The largest body of desirable timber land noticed is situated at Yakutat 
on the mainland south, east, and west, following the coast line, extending back from 
the coast probably 15 or 20 miles. A sawmill, with railroads, is in course of construc- 
tion, with the timber and salmon fisheries in view. This land is valuable and being 
located at the present. Should be subdivided. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. Frank Warner, 
Examiner of Surveys. 



158 KEPOKT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



F.— RAILROAD DIVISION. 

This division is charged with the administration and adjustment of 
all grants of land by Congress to aid in the construction of railroads, 
wagon roads, canals, and river improvements. There are 79 land- 
grant railroads, and the grant for nearly every one has some feature 
or features peculiar to itself, arising from the conditions prescribed in 
the act making it, from conditions in subsequent acts in some manner 
modifying the original, from conditions affecting the attachment of 
rights under it, and the withdrawals of lands ordered for its benefit 
upon the filing of maps of the general route, the definite location, and 
the construction of the road, or from decisions of the courts or of the 
Department of contests between the grantees, and the conflicting claims 
of settlers and others. 

It is estimated that the area covered by these grants as originally 
made was 197,000,000 acres, and that by reason of forfeiture by Con- 
gress, because of the failure of the grantees to construct the roads as 
required by the granting acts, this amount was reduced to such an 
extent that the acreage at this time is estimated at 155,000,000 acres. 

With the exceptions of conflicts arising from mineral and swamp- 
land claims, all contests between the claimant under the railroad grants 
and others are examined and determined by this division, and in addi- 
tion thereto, the division is charged with the duty of examining all 
listings and selections by the grantees, of the preparation therefrom 
of clear lists for submission to the Secretary of the Interior for 
approval, and of the patenting of the lands after the approval of such 
lists, and of answering all correspondence relating to said grants or to 
the conflicts arising under them. The same is true as to wagon-road, 
canal, and river-improvement grants. 

This division is also charged with the duty of examining and pass- 
ing upon all applications for rights of way over the public lands and 
reservations for railroads, reservoirs, canals, ditches, pipe lines, and 
other conduits for irrigation, for domestic use and other beneficial 
uses, for oil-pipe lines, for tram roads, telegraph and telephone lines, 
for plants for the generation and distribution of electric power, and 
lines for the transmission of such power, and of examining and decid- 
ing all conflicts and contests arising under applications for such rights 
of wa}^. 

The division is also charged with the examination of all lists of 
selections made under the act of August 18, 1891, known as the Carey 
Act, and the acts of June 11, 1896, and March 3, 1901, amendatory 
thereof, granting to certain States not to exceed 1,000,000 acres of 
desert lands, of the final proofs made thereon, of the preparation of 
clear lists from such selections for the approval of the Secretary of 
the Interior, and of the patenting of the lands when so approved; also 
of the disposal of contests arising from conflicts of other claims with 
said selections. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 159 

Tabulated statement of work performed during the year ended June 30, 1904. 

DOCKET CASES. 

pending July 1, 1903 1,087 ' 

Cases docketed and reinstated during the year 461 

Total 1 , 548 

Cases closed during the year 348 

Cases pending July 1, 1904 1, 200 

Including — 

Cases pending before the Secretary on appeal or otherwise . . 60 

Cases pending before this Office in which action has been had. 665 
Cases suspended to await decisions in other cases and actions 
on adjustments of the railroad grants by the Department.. 297 

1, 022 

Leaving pending ready for action 178 

Cases transmitted to Secretary during the year: 

Appeals, etc 342 

Motions for review 7 

Applications for certiorari 16 

365 

Office decisions rendered during the year 2, 180 

Hearings ordered 14 

Secretary's decisions promulgated - 382 

Reports to Congress 17 

Reports to the Secretary 38 

APPLICATIONS FOR LANDS. 

Disposed of 385 

Pending July 1, 1904, subject to action « 

ENTRIES 

Pending July 1, 1903: 

Original entries 407 

Final entries 359 

766 

Received during the year: 

Original entries 187 

Final entries 177 

364 

Total 1, 130 

Disposed of during the year by decisions rendered and entries referred 
to other divisions, including canceled entries: 

Original entries 199 

Final entries 219 

418 

Pending July 1, 1904: 

Original entries 395 

Final entries 317 

712 

Included in docket cases 342 

Suspended 345 

687 

Balance 25 

Nearly all of which have received action. 

o Of the 385 Michigan applications that were pending July 1, 1903, but were sus- 
pended awaiting the action of the courts, all have been relieved and have been dis- 
posed of, leaving none suspended. 



160 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

LETTERS. 

Pending July 1, 1903 454 

Received during the year 10, 123 

10,577 

Disposed of during the year: 

Answered 4, 878 

Filed (no answer required) 5, 021 

Referred to other divisions 473 

10, 372 

Pending unanswered July 1, 1904 205 

Letters written during the year 11, 531 

Applications under acts of July 1, 1898, and March 3, 1901: 

Pending and received 849 

Acted upon 457 

Closed 244 

RAILROAD SELECTIONS. 

Received acres . . 1,911, 775. 26 

Certified or patented do 4, 422, 564. 85 

Canceled do 4, 660. 45 

W r AGON-ROAD SELECTIONS. 

Received acres. . 137, 087. 50 

Certified or patented do 128, 506. 81 

Canceled do 

PATENTS. 

Number issued - 216 

Number of pages w r ritten 1, 591 

Number of pages compared 3, 890 

Number of pages recorded 1, 579 

Number of pages copied 56 

Lands certifinl or patented on account of railroad and wagon-road grants during the fiscal 

year ended Jane 30, 1904- 



Name of road. 


Where located. 


Number of 

acres. 


RAILROADS. 

State grants. 
St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern 


Arkansas 


762. 96 




240. 00 




do 


40.00 




Florida 


160. 00 


Gulf and Ship Island 




434. 42 




Kansas 


56.52 


St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba: 

Main line 


North Dakota 




Do 






do 


> 17, 412. 20 




do 






do 






do 


236. 25 


Do .. 




877. 76 


Do 


Washington 

Kansas 


6, 805. 74 




40.00 




190. 96 






120. 00 






2,531.87 










29, 908. 68 









REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL I AND OFFICE. 161 

Lands certified or patented on account of railroad and wagon-road grants during the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1904 — Continued. 



Name of road. 



Where located. 



Number of 
acres. 



railroads— continued. 

Corporations. 

Atlantic and Pacific (now Santa Fe Pacific) 

Central Pacific 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Central Pacific (successor to California and Oregon) 

Union Pacific (successor to Denver Pacific) 

Union Pacific (successor to Kansas Pacific) 

Do 

Union Pacific 

Do 

Do 

New Orleans Pacific 

Northern Pacific 

Do 



Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 



Oregon and California 

Sioux City and Pacific 

Southern Pacific (main line) .. 
Southern Pacific (branch line) 



Total of corporations. 



WAGON ROADS. 



Arizona 

California 

Nevada 

Utah 

Idaho 

California 

Colorado 

do 

Kansas 

Nebraska 

Utah 

Wyoming 

Louisiana 

Minnesota 

North Dakota 

Montana 

Idaho 

Washington . . 

Oregon 

do 

Nebraska 

California 

do 



California and Oregon Land 

Military). 
Corvallis and Yaquina Bay. .. 
The Dalles Military 



Co. (successor to Oregon Central 



Total of wagon roads. 



87, 

11, 

1, 353, 

46, 

1, 

38, 

1, 

1,441, 

27, 

15, 
121, 

12, 

351, 
585, 
52, 

82, 



132. 
1, 



772. 89 

189. 84 
428. 39 

019. 55 
451.35 
507. 35 
163. 04 
815. 02 
491.09 
636. 96 
881. 56 
025. 20 

80.84 
963. 53 

899. 56 
378. 60 
227. 56 
662. 89 
145. 40 
594. 13 

40.00 

225. 85 

055. 57 




4, 392, 656. 17 



96,710 18 



4,121.19 
27, 675. 44 



128, 506. 81 



RECAPITULATION. 

Acres. 

Total to State grants 29, 908. 68 

Total to corporations 4, 392, 656. 17 

Total to wagon roads 128, 506. 81 



Grand total 4, 551, 071. 6 



RAILROAD LAND GRANTS. 



A comparison with several preceding years shows a general increase 
in the business of the division and of the work disposed of during the 
year just closed. In docket cases there were received and reinstated 
461, as against 441 in the year 1903. There were inclosed 348 cases, as 
against 351, and the number of decisions rendered was 2,180, as against 
1,603 in the }^ear 1903, the latter an increase of over 33 per cent. Of 
the 1,200 docket cases pending at the beginning of the year there were 
pending at the close only 178 in condition to be acted upon, the others 
having been considered or suspended. There were transmitted to the 
Department on appeal, motion for review, or application for certiorari, 
365 cases, as against 207 the previous } r ear, an increase of 148, or a little 
over 40 per cent. 

All of the 385 Michigan applications which were not included in 
docket cases and were pending at the beginning of the year have been 
disposed of. 



8970—04- 



■11 



162 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Of entries there were received during the year 361, as against 305 
received during the previous year, which, added to the 905 pending at 
the beginning of the year, made total on hand for action 1,269. Of 
these 712 were undisposed at the close of the year, as against 766 undis- 
posed of at the close of the previous year, showing a gain in this class 
of work. 

Of letters there were received during the year 10,123, as against 
9,385 received during the preceding year, and there were disposed of 
during the year 10,372, as against 9,036 disposed of during the previous 
year. There were pending at the close of the year only 205 letters, as 
against 151 pending at the close of the previous year, thus showing a 
considerable increase as well as a gain in this class of work. 

Of listings and selections by railroad and wagon-road companies 
there were received during the year 2,018,862.76 acres, as against 
4,185,023 acres received during the previous year, and there were 
patented 1,551,071.66 acres, embraced in 216 patents, as against 
5,816,957.01 acres patented the previous year, embraced in 200 patents. 
While this shows a decrease in the acres patented, there was an increase 
in the number of patents issued and a gain over the work received of 
2,136,160.21 acres. During the year 1,660 acres of railroad listings 
and selections have been canceled. 

ADJUSTMENTS. 

The suit which has been pending for several years, brought by the 
United States against the Northern Pacific Railroad Company and the 
Northern Pacific Railway Company, to cancel patents issued to the 
railroad company to which the railway company had succeeded, was 
decided by the United States Supreme Court, February 23, 1901 
(193 U. S., 1), in favor of the company. The lands involved are situ- 
ated in the State of Washington, north of Portland in the State of 
Oregon, and within the overlapping limits of the grant to the railroad 
compan}^ by the act of July 2, 1861, and the joint resolution of May 
31, 1870, and said decision determined the right to be in the compan}^, 
under the grant of 1870, to all the land within said overlap not other- 
wise disposed of, irrespective of whether they had been patented 
or not. 

Under a previous ruling of the Department, that these lands were 
forfeited by the act of September 29, 1890, many persons settled upon 
and a considerable number made entries of the lands. All of these 
claims, which were inferior to that of the company under its grant, 
excepting those wherein patents have been issued, but which would 
otherwise come within the provisions of the act of July 1, 1898 
(30 Stat., 597-620), have been examined, 159 have been listed for 
approval, and have been approved by the Department for relinquish- 
ment by the company under said act, and the company has been called 
upon to make the relinquishments. The remainder, excepting the few 
cases wherein the individual claimants have elected to relinquish and 
which have received appropriate action, have either been rejected as 
not coming within the law authorizing the relinquishment, the settlers 
called upon to make their elections to retain or relinquish the land, or 
are ready for listing for approval for relinquishment by the company. 

The Department has decided that where the lands covered by the 
conflicting claims have been patented to the company, the law is not 



KEPOET OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 163 

applicable even though they may otherwise be within its provisions, 
and, in a number of cases, the individual claimants have been so advised, 
and that unless the}^ could induce the company to reconvey the lands 
to the United States and thus restore jurisdiction in the Department, 
their cases would necessarily be adjudicated on the merits. 

The act of July 1, 1898, above referred to, provided for the adjust- 
ment by the land department of conflicting claims of settlers and others 
and the Northern Pacific Railway Company to lands within the limits, 
both primary and indemnity, of the company's grant, and under its 
provisions where the company and the adverse claimant had claims 
pending January 1, 1898, and were still maintaining them, the claim- 
ants against the company were given the option of relinquishing their 
claims and selecting other lands in lieu thereof, of the character speci- 
fied, with credit for the residence and improvements on the original 
claim; or, to retain the original claim, and they are required to elect 
whether they will retain or relinquish. Should the individual claim- 
ant elect to retain his claim, the railroad company is required to relin- 
quish unless it has sold or contracted to sell the land, uses or needs it 
for railroad purposes, or it is valuable for stone, iron, or coal, in either 
of which events it is not required to relinquish; and, should it refuse 
to relinquish when called upon and makes satisfactory showing that 
the land is within one of the exceptions named, and the individual 
again refuses to transfer his claim, the case proceeds to adjudication on 
the merits as though said act had not been passed. 

The Department having decided that the act of 1898 was not appli- 
cable to cases where patents had issued prior to the passage, Congress, 
by act approved March 2, 1901, extended its provisions to certain 
patented claims to lands within the indemnity limits of the company's 
grant. In addition to the cases above mentioned as being within the 
overlap of the company's grants north of Portland, Oreg., there have 
been before the office for action during the year 849 cases, 214 of 
which were closed and 457 were considered and received action look- 
ing to their final disposal. The railroad company has filed relinquish- 
ments in 248 cases, embraced in 24 lists approved by the Department, 
and relieved them from conflict. 

An examination has been made of the lands lying within the over- 
lapping indemnity limits of the grant to the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company, main iine, and the primary limits of the forfeited Atlantic 
and Pacific Railroad grant, and lists prepared of all the lands therein 
which have been patented to the Southern Pacific Company, of all 
lands which have been selected by said company, but not patented, 
and all lands which have been applied for by it and the applications 
are pending, for the purpose of preparing a record for the institution 
of suit against the Southern Pacific Company for the recovery of the 
patented lands, and for quieting the title in the United States to all 
other odd sections of lands within such overlap, the right of selection 
of which is claimed by said company and the suit has been brought. 

By act approved March 3, 1891 (26 Stat. L., 854), sections 16, 17, 
and 18, as amended by the acts of February 21, 1893 (27 Stat. L., 470), 
and June 27, 1898 (30 Stat. L., 495), Congress made provision for 
securing to certain settlers on and occupants, known as "small hold- 
ing claimants," of lands in the Territory of New Mexico and other 
Territories and States, title to lands occupied by them, not to exceed 
160 acres to any one person, under specified conditions. It was found 



164 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

after many of these claimants within the Territory of New Mexico had 
made proof on their claims, their holdings in whole or in part covered 
odd-numbered sections within the limits of the grant to the Atlantic 
and Pacific Railroad Company, which had passed to the compan}^ there- 
under, and, Congress thereupon passed the act of April 28, 1904 (33 
Stat. L., 556), for the relief of the small-holding settlers. 

This latter act authorized the railroad company, when requested by 
the Secretary of the Interior so to do, to relinquish to the United 
States any part or the whole of any section containing a claim or 
claims of small holding settlers within the Territory of New Mexico, 
and select in lieu thereof other lands of equal quality in said Territory 
as may be agreed upon with the Secretary of the Interior. Pursuant 
to the requirements of said act, an examination was made of the 
records and plats of this office and a list of the small holding claimants 
prepared, which, together with instructions for their guidance in car- 
rying its provisions into effect, was transmitted to the local land 
officers. 

Under the act of March 3, 1903, which provided for the relief of 
certain settlers in Alabama on lands within the limits of the grants to 
aid in the construction of the Mobile and Girard and the Tennessee and 
Coosa railroads, by authorizing the relinquishment to the United 
States of any land recovered in any court of competent jurisdiction 
from such settlers by either of said railroad companies or its assigns,, 
releases have been made, submitted to, and accepted by the Depart- 
ment in 104 cases, and proper action looking to securing title to the 
homesteaders or the parties claiming under them has been taken. 

The large number of cases involving lands within the State of 
Minnesota, and within the limits of the grants by Congress to aid in 
the construction of the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway,, 
main line and branches, which had been suspended pending the adjust- 
ment of said grants and were relieved from suspension during the pre- 
vious year by the adjustment of said grants, have all been disposed of. 

Congress passed an act, which was approved February 26, 1904 (33 
Stat. L., 51), for "the relief of settlers on lands in Sherman County, 
in the State of Oregon." The lands referred to are those lying within 
the limits of the grant by the act of February 25, 1867 (14 Stat. L., 
409), to aid in the construction of The Dalles Military Wagon Road, 
and the withdrawal on that portion of the grant to the Northern Pacific 
Railroad, now Northern Pacific Railway Company, along the Columbia 
River between Wallula, Wash., and Portland, Oreg., which was declared 
forfeited by the act of September 29, 1890. Under a departmental 
ruling these lands were held to have been excepted from the wagon- 
road grant, were opened to entry, and numerous parties settled upon 
them and made entries. Subsequently the United States Supreme 
Court decided that they passed under the wagon-road grant, and the 
claims of the settlers having failed, it was with a view to the relief of 
persons who made settlement, entry, and improvement of these lands 
that the act of February 26, 1904, was passed. 

The act authorized and directed the Secretary of the Interior to 
make a ver}^ extensive investigation to determine what claimants there 
are, the reasonable value of the lands settled upon, the dates of the 
settlements, and the value of the improvements of the several classes 
at the several dates named. 

Instructions have been prepared and transmitted to the local land 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 165 

officers and a special agent, who has been detailed to make the inves- 
tigation, for their guidance in collecting the information desired by 
Congress. 

The grants to aid in the construction of the following railroads and 
wagon roads have been examined at various times with a view to their 
final adjustment, have been submitted with recommendations to the 
Department, and have been returned with instructions chieffy with 
reference to the institution of suits for the recovery of title to lands 
found to have been erroneous^ certified or patented, or of the Gov- 
ernment price thereof if they had been sold by the grantee company 
to bona fide purchasers whose claims were found to be protected by 
the act of March 3, 1887 (24 Stat. L,, 556), or whose titles were con- 
firmed by the act of March 2, 1896 (29 Stat. L., 12). 



Name of road. 



Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha 

Hannibal and St. Joseph 

Grand Rapids and Indiana 

Sioux City and St. Paul 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas 

Winona and St. Peter 

Coosa and Tennessee 

Dubuque and Pacific 

St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba (main line and St. Vincent extension; 

Hastings and Dakota 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern (Arkansas) 

Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul 

Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul (on resubmission of July 23, 1898) 

Vicksburg, Shreveport and Pacific 

Coos Bay military Avagon road 

Bay de Noquet and Marquette 

Mobile and Girard 

Alabama and Florida 

Florida and Alabama 

Willamette Valley and Cascade Mountain Wagon Road Co 

'.St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern (Missouri) 

Southwest Pacific 

Little Rock and Fort Smith 

Florida Central and Peninsular 

South and North Alabama 

Do 



Burlington and Missouri River (Iowa) 

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe 

Atlantic and Pacific (Missouri) or St. Louis and San Francisco (Springfield to west 

boundary of State ) , 

Central Pacific (Nevada) 

Leavenworth, Lawrence and Galveston 

Chicago and Northwestern (Wisconsin) 

Central Pacific (California) 

Central Pacific (California) , successor to California and Oregon , 

Wills Valley, now Alabama and Chattanooga , 

Northeast and Southwestern, now Alabama and Chattanooga 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific 

A'icksburg- and Meridian 

Northern Paciiic in Montana 

Northern Pacific in Washington: 

Main line 

Branch line . * ' 

Southern Minnesota Rwv. Extension Co 

Northern Pacific (grant of May 31, 1870), Oregon 

Northern Pacific (grant of Mav 31, 1870), Washington 

Northern Pacific ( Minnesota ) 

Northern Pacific (North Dakota) 

Northern Pacific (Idaho) 

Oregon and California 

Oregon Central 

Burlington and Missouri River ( Iowa ) 

Burlington and Missouri River (Nebraska) 

Cedar Rapids and Missouri River 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern (Arkansas) 

Southern Pacific (branch line) 

St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba: 

Main line 

St. Vincent extension 

Brainerd branch 



Date of 


return. 


Feb. 


12, 1887 


May 


29, 1887 


June 


30, 1887 


July 


27, 1887 


Aug. 


2,1887 


Dec. 


26, 1S89 


Julv 


25, 1890 


Apr. 


9, 1891 


June 10, 1891 


June 23, 1891 


Nov. 


16, 1891 


July 


29, 1892 


Oct. 


21,1898 


Mav 


18, 1892 


Sept. 


1,1892 


Oct. 


3, 1892 


Apr. 


24, 1893 


Dec. 


26, 1893 


Do. 


Jan. 


27, 1894 


Feb. 


12, 1894 


Mar. 


21, 1894 


Oct. 


10, 1894 


Dec. 


6, 1894 


Dec. 


22, 1894 


Jan. 


12, 1895 


July 


9, 1895 


July 


18, 1895 


Sept 


23, 1895 


Dec. 


9, 1895 


Feb. 


21, 1896 


Oct. 


16,1896 


Feb. 


27, 1897 


Do. 


Mar. 


15, 1897 


Do. 


Nov. 


30, 1897 


July 


18, 1898 


June 29, 1899 


July 


13, 1900 


Do. 


July 


31,1900 


Aug. 


3, 1900 


Do. 


July 


10, 1900 


Do. 


Do. 


Sept 


1, 1900 


Jan. 


31 , 1901 


Feb. 


23,1901 


Do. 


Mav 


1, 1901 


July 


13, 1901 


Do. 


Apr. 


3, 1903 



166 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



RIGHT OF WAY RAILROADS. 

By the act approved March 3, 1875 (18 Stat. L., 482), Congress 
granted to railroads, upon certain conditions, right of way through 
the public lands. Right of wa} 7 for railroads, wagon roads, and tram- 
roads in Alaska was granted, upon certain conditions, by the act of 
May 14, 1898 (30 Stat. L., 409). 

Under the provisions of these acts and of special acts, 664 companies 
have tiled articles of incorporation which have been accepted, 34 of 
which were accepted during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 
Right of way has been approved to 615 companies, 20 of which received 
their first approval during the same period. 

There were received during the year 509 maps of locations of rail- 
roads, which, with those already pending, made a total of 628 maps 
on hand for action during the year; of these, 172 have been approved, 
30 have been filed (not requiring approval), and 397 have been other- 
wise disposed of, 21 of which were rejected, the rest having been 
returned for correction, leaving 33 waiting action June 30, 1904. 

Instructions for making applications under the act of 1875 are given 
in the circular of February 11, 1904, and under the act of 1898 in the 
circular of January 13, 1904. 

A list of railroad and wagon-road maps that have been approved 
under said acts is given in the following table, with references to- 
various special acts passed for the benefit of the applicants: 

Right of way railroads and icagon roads on public lands under the general act of March 3,, 
1875 (18 Stat. L., 482) , with references to various special acts applicable to said companies. 

[The * indicates that right of way was first approved during the past year.] 



Name of company. 



Aberdeen, Bismarck and Northwestern Rwy. , successor to Ordway, 
Bismarck and Northwestern Rwy. 

Aberdeen, Fergus Falls and Pierre R. R 

Agua Fria and Hassavampa Rwy 

Akron, Sterling and Northern R. R. (act May 14, 1898, 30 Stat. L., 409, 
right of way in Alaska). 

Alabama and Florida R. R 

Alabama and Little River R. R 

Alamogordo and Sacramento Mountain Rwy 

Arizona and Nevada R. R. and Navigation Co 

Arizona and Southeastern R. R 

Arizona and Utah Rwy 

Arizona Mineral Belt R. R 

Arizona Narrow Gauge R. R., now Tucson, Globe and Northern R. R... 

Arizona Northern Rwy 

Arizona Southern R. R. (act Aug. 5, 1882, 22 Stat. L., 299, through Pa- 
pago Indian Reservation). 

Arkansas Southern R. R 

Arkansas Vallev and New Mexico R. R 

Arkansas Valley Rwy. (act of June 23, 1874, 18 Stat. L., 274) ) 

Aspen and Western Rwy 

Aspen and Short Line Rwy 

Atlantic and Pacific R. R. (act of July 27, 1866, 14 Stat. L., 292) 

Baker City and Oregon Wonder Electric Railway and Improvement Co.*. 

Bakers Park and Lower Animas R. R * 

Bald Mountain Rwy 

Barnesville and Moorhead Rwy 

Bear Butte and Deadwood Rwy 

Beaver Valley R. R 

Bellingham Bay and British Columbia R. R. Co.* 

Bellingham Bav Rwv. and Navigation Co 

Bighorn Southern R.' R. (act Feb. 12, 1889, 25 Stat. L., 660, through Crow 
Indian Reservation, Mont.; act Feb. 23, 1889, 25 Stat. L., 690, through 
Fort Custer Military Reservation, Mont.; act Mar. 1, 1893, 27 Stat, L., 
529, through Crow Indian Reservation, Mont.); now Chicago, Bur- 
lington and Quincy R. R. 



State or Territory. 



North Dakota and Southi 
Dakota. 
Do. 
Arizona. 
Alaska. 

Alabama. 

Do. 
New Mexico. 
Arizona. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Arkansas. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Arizona. 
Oregon. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Minnesota. 
South Dakota. 
Kansas. 
Washington. 

Do. 
Montana. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 167 

Right of way railroads and wagon roads on public lands under the general act of March 3, 

1875, etc.— Continued. 



Name of company. 



Billings and Northern R. R 

Billings, Clarkes Fork and Cooke City R. R. (act June 1, 1888, 25 Stat. 

L., 167, through Crow Indian Reservation, Mont.). 

Bingham Canyon and Camp Floyd R. R 

Black Hills and Fort Pierre R.R 

Black Hills and Wyoming R. R ■ 

Black Hills Central R. R 

Black Hills R. R 

Blackwell, Enid and Southwestern Rwy. (act Mar. 2, 1899, 30 Stat. L., 

990, through Indian lands) . 

Blue Mountain and Columbia River R. R 

Bodie Rwy. and Lumber Co 

Boise Basin R. R., "The" 

Boise, Nampa and Owyhee Rwy. (Jo., Limited, 

Boulder, Left Hand and Middle Park R. R. and Navigation Co 

Brackett (George A.) Wagon Road (act May 14, 1898, 30 Stat. L., 409, 

right of way in Alaska). 
Brainerd and Northern Minnesota Rwy. (act Feb. 24, 1896. 29 Stat, L., 

12, through Leech Lake and Chippewa Indian reservations, Minn.). 

Bridal Veil Lumbering Co 

Burlington and Colorado R. R 

Burlington, Kansas and Southwestern R. R., now Southern Kansas Rwy 

Busk Tunnel Rwy 

Butte, Anaconda and Pacific Rwy 

Butte County R. R. * 

Butte and Salmon River Electric R. R. * 

California Central Rwy 

California Central Rwy.. Mountain Division 

California Central Rwy., Nevada Division 

California Central Rwy., San Joaquin Division 

California Eastern Rwy 

California Northern R. R. (act of Aug. 4, 1852, 10 Stat. L., 28) 

California Short Line Rwy 

California Southern Extension R. R., now California Southern R. R... 
California Southern R. R., successor to California Southern Extension 

R.R. 

Canon City and Cripple Creek Electric Rwy 

Canon City and Cripple Creek Gold Belt Rwy 

Canon City and Cripple Creek R.R 

Canon City and San Juan Rwy 

Canon Creek R. R 

Canon de Agua R.R 

Canton, Aberdeen and Nashville R.R 

Carbon County Rwy 

Carbon Cut-off Rwy 

Carson and Colorado R. R 

Carson and Colorado R. R., Second Division 

Carson and Colorado R. R. , Third Division 

Casselton Branch R.R 

Castle Valley Rwy 

Cebolla Rwy 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa Falls and Northwestern Rwy. (act Mar. 2,1889,25 

Stat. L., 1012, through Pipestone Indian Reservation, Minn.). 

Central Arizona Rwv Co.* 

Central Pacific Rwy> 

central Washington R. R 

Cheyenne and Burlington R.R 

Cheyenne and Northern Rwy. (act June 30, 1886, 24 Stat, L., 104, through 

Fort Russell and Fort Laramie military reservations). 

Chicago and Dakota Rwy '. 

Chicago and Northwestern Rwy., successor to Menomonee River Rwy. 

and Iron River Rwy. 
Chicago, Burlington and Quincv R. R., successor to Big Horn Southern 

R. R. 
Chicago, Kansas and Nebraska Rwv., now Chicago, Rock Island and 

Pacific Rwy. (act Mar. 2, 1887, 24 Stat. L., 446; act June 27. 1890, 26 Stat. 

L.,181; through Indian Territory). 

Chicago, Kansas and Western Rwv 

Chicago. Milwaukee and St. Paul Rwv. (act of Apr. 30, 1888, sec. 16,25 

Stat. L.,94; act Mar. 2, 1889, sec. 16, 25 Stat. L., 888: through Great Sioux 

Indian Reservation). 

Chicago, Rock Island and Choctaw Rwv. * 

Chicago, Rock Island and Colorado Rwy 

Chicago, Rock Island and El Paso Rwy 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Rwv., successor to Chicago, Kansas 

and Nebraska Rwv. (act June 27, 1890, 26 Stat. L., 181; act Feb. 27, 1893, 

27 Stat. L., 492; through Indian Territory.) 
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Rwy 

Chicosa Canon Rwv 

Chilcat Inlet Rwy. and Navigation Co. (act May 14, 1898, 30 Stat, L., 409) . 



State or Territory. 



Montana, 

Montana and Wyoming. 

Utah. 

South Dakota. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Oklahoma. 

Oregon. 
California. 
Idaho. 
Do. 

Colorado. 

Alaska. 

Minnesota. 

Oregon. 

Colorado. 

Nebraska and Kansas. 

Colorado. 

Montana, 

California. 

Montana. 

California. 

Do. 
Nevada. 
California. 

Do. 

Do. 
Utah. 
California. 

Do. 

Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Idaho. 
Colorado. 
Alabama. 
Utah. 
Wyoming. 
Nevada. 
California. 

Do. 
North Dakota. 
Utah. 
Colorado. 
Minnesota, South Dakota, 

and Iowa. 
Arizona. 

Utah and Nevada. 
Washington. 
Wyoming. 

Do. 

Minnesota. 
Michigan. 

Montana and Wyoming. 

Oklahoma, Colorado, and 
Kansas. 

Kansas. 

North Dakota, South Da- 
kota, and Wisconsin. 

New Mexico. 
Colorado. 
New Mexico. 

Oklahoma, Colorado, and 
Kansas. 



Wisconsin and 

kota. 
Colorado. 
Alaska. 



South Da- 



168 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Right of way railroads and wagon roads on public land* under the general act of March 3, 

1875, etc. — Continued. 



Name of company. 



State or Territory. 



Choctaw Coal and Rwy. Co., now Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf R. R. 

(acts Feb. 18, 1888, and Feb. 13, 1889, 25 Stat. L., 35 and 668; act Feb. 21, 

1891, 26 Stat. L., 765; acts Jan. 22 and Aug. 24, 1894, 28 Stat. L., 27 and 

502; act Apr. 24, 1896, 29 Stat, L., 98; act Mar. 28, 1900, 31 Stat. L., 52; 

through Indian Territory). 
Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf R. R., successor to Choctaw Coal and 

Rwy. Co. 
Clearwater Short Line Rwy. (act Mar. 1, 1899, 30 Stat. L., 918; through 

Nez Perce Indian Reservation) . 
Clearwater Valley R. R. (act Feb. 28, 1899, 30 Stat, L.,906; through Nez 

Perce Indian Reservation). 

Clifton and Lordsburg Rwy 

Clifton and Southern Pacific Rwy 

Coeur d'Alene and Spokane Rwy 

Cceur d'Alene Rwy. and Navigation Co 

Colorado and New Mexico R. R 

Colorado and Northeastern Rwy 

Colorado and Northwestern Rwy 

Colorado and Southeastern Rwy* 

Colorado and Utah Rwy 

Colorado and Wyoming R. R 

Colorado and Wyoming Rwy 

Colorado Central R, R., now Union Pacific, Denver and Gulf Rwy 

Colorado Midland Rwy , 

Colorado Northern Rwy 

Colorado Rwy 

Colorado River and Silver District R. R 

Colorado Southwestern Rwy 

Colorado Springs and Cripple Creek District Rwy., successor to Cripple 

('reek District Rwy. 

( !< dorado State Line Rwy 

Colorado Western R. R 

Columbia and Klickitat Rwy 

Columbia and Palouse R. R. 

Columbia and Puget Sound R, R 

Columbia Rwy. and Navigation Co., successor to Farmers' Railway, 

Navigation and Steamship Portage Co. 

Columbia River and Northern Rwy.* 

C< )1 um bia Southern R wy 

Columbia Southern Rwy. Extension Co* 

Columbia Valley R. R 

Continental Rwy. and Telegraph Co 

Coos Bay, Roseburg and Eastern Railroad and Navigation Co 

Cortez and Dolores Valley R. R 

Corvallis and Eastern R. R 

Creed and Gunnison Short Line R. R 

Cripple Creek District Rwv., now Colorado Springs and Cripple Creek 

District Rwy. (act June 27, 1898, 30 Stat. L., 493; through Pikes Peak 

Timber Land Reserve). 
Cripple Creek Short Line Rwy. (act July 8, 1898, 30 Stat. L., 729; through 

Pikes Peak Timber Land Reserve). 

Crystal River Rwy 

Current River Rwy 

Dakota and Great Northern Rwy 

Dakota and Great Southern Rwv 

Dakota Central Rwy. (act April 30, 1888, sec. 16, 25 Stat, L..94; act Mar. 2, 

1889, sec. 16, 25 Stat L., 888; through Great Sioux Indian Reservation: 

right of way through Winnebago Indian Reservation, see decision of 

Acting Secretary, .bin. 24, 1882). 

Dakota Grand Trunk Rwy. (act of June 1, 1872, 17 Stat. L., 202) 

Dak »ta and Great Northern Rwv.* 

Dakota Southern R. R. (act of May 27, 1872, 17 Stat. L., 162) 

Dakota, Wyoming and Missouri River R. R 

Dawson Rail way Co.* 

Deadwood and Redwater Valley Rwy 

Deadwood Central R. R ' 

Deming, Sierra Madre and Pacific R. R 

Denver and Canon City Rwy 

Denver and Montana R. K 

Denver and New Orleans R. R 

Denver and Rio Grande R. R.. successor to Denver and Rio Grande 

Rwy. (act Apr. 16, 1888, 25 Stat. L., 85; through Fort Crawford Military 

Reservation). 
Denver and Rio Grande Rwv. (act of June 8, 1872, 17 Stat. L., 339: act 

Mar. 3, 1875, 18 Stat. L., 516; act Mar. 3, 1877, 19 Stat L., 405). now R. R. 
Denver and Rio Grande Western Rwy., now Rio Grande Western Rwy. 

Denver and Santa Fe Rwv 

Denver, Cripple Creek and Southwestern R. R. (act Mar. 28, 1896, 29 Stat. 

L., 190; through South Platte Forest Reserve and Plum Creek Timber 

Land Reserve). 
Denver. Leadville and Gunnison Rwv 



Oklahoma. 



Do. 



Idaho and Washington. 

Idaho, Oregon, and Wash- 
ington. 
New Mexico. 
Arizona. 
Idaho. 

Do. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 

Colorado and Wyoming. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Washington. 

Idaho and Washington. 

Washington. 

Oregon and Washington. 

Washington. 
Oregon. 

Do. 
Washington. 
Colorado. 
Oregon. 
Colorado. 
( >regon. 
Colorado. 

Do. 



Do. 

Do. 
Missouri. 
North Dokota. 
South Dakota. 
North Dakota and South 
Dakota. 



Do. 
North Dakota, 
South Dakota. 

Do. 
New Mexico. 
South Dakota. 

Do. 
New Mexico. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Colorado and New Mexico. 

Do. 



Do. 

Utah. 
Colorado. 
Do. 



Do. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 169 

Might of way railroads and wagon roads on public lands under the general act of March 3, 

1875, etc. — Continued. 



Name of company, 



Denver, Northwestern and Pacific Rwy 

Denver, Rollinsville and Western R. R 

Denver, Salt Lake and Western R. R 

Denver Short Line Rwy 

Denver, South Park and Hill Top Rwy 

Denver, South Park and Leadville R. R 

Denver, South Park and pacific R. R 

Denver, Texas and Fort Worth R. R 

Denver, Utah and Pacific R. R 

Denver, Western and Pacific Rwy 

Detroit, Mackinac and Marquette R. R., now Duluth, South Shore and 
Atlantic Rwy. 

Drummond and Philiipsburg R. R 

Duluth and Iron Range R. R 

Duluth and Manitoba R. R. (act June 25, 1890, 26 Stat. L., 179; through 
Fort Pembina Military Reservation, N. Dak.). 

Duluth and Winnepeg R. R., now Duluth, Superior and Western R. R. 
(act Oct. 17, 1888, 25'Stat. L., 558, through Fond du Lac Indian Reser- 
vation: act Mar 2, 1889, 25 Stat. L., 1010, through Leech Lake and 
White Earth Indian reservations; act June 2, 1890, 26 Stat. L., 126, 
through Winnibigoshish, (lass Lake, White Oak Point, and Red Lake 
Indian reservations; act Aug. 27, 1894, 28 Stat. L., 504; act Feb. 23, 
1897, 29 Stat. L., 702. through Chippewa and White Earth Indian res- 
ervations. All in Minnesota). 

Duluth. Crookston and Northern R. R 

Duluth, Missabe and Northern Rwy 

Duluth, Mississippi River and Northern R. R 

Duluth, Pierre and Black Hills R. R 

Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Rwy., successor to Detroit. Mackinac 
and Marquette R. R.. and Duluth, Superior and Michigan Rwy. 

Duluth. Superior and Michigan Rwy., now Duluth, South Shore and 
Atlantic Rwy. (treaty Sept. 30, 1854710 Stat. L., 1109, art. 3; through 
La Pointe Indian Reservation, Wis.). 

Duluth, Superior and Western R. R., successor to Duluth and Winnipeg 
R. R., now Eastern Rwy. Co. of Minnesota (act Feb. 23, 1897, 29 Stat. 
L., 702; through Chippewa and White Earth Indian reservations). 

Duluth, Watertown and Pacific Rwy 

Dunseith and Southeastern R. R 

Durante. Cortex and Salt Lake R. R 

Durango Rwy 

Durango. Rico and Northern R. R 

Dyea and Chilkoot R. R. (act May 14, 1898, 30 Stat. L., 409) 

Eagle Salt Works R. R.* 

Eastern Oregon Rwy.* 

Eastern Rwy. Co. of Minnesota* 

Eastern Rwy. Co. of New Mexico * 

Eastern Wyoming R. R 

Eastern Wyoming Rwy 

Echo and Park City Rwy., successor to Summit County R. R 

Elk Mountain Rwy *. 

El Paso and Northeastern Rwv 

El Paso and Rock Island Rwy 

El Paso and Southwestern R. R 

Enid and Anada rko Rwy 

Escambia R. R 

Eureka and Palisade R. R 

Eureka Springs Rwy 

Everett and Monte Cristo Rwy 

Fairhaven and Southern R. R 

Fargo and Southwestern R. R 

Fargo, Larimore and Northern Rwy 

Farmers' Railway, Navigation and Steamship Portage Co., now Colum- 
bia Railway and Navigation Co. 

Florence and' Cripple Creek R. R 

Florence, Cripple ( reek and State Line R. R 

Florence Southern R. R 

Florence, Victor and Cripple Creek R. R., "The" 

Florida Southern Rwv \ 

Forest City and Sioux City R. R. (act Feb. 12, 1895, 28 Stat. L., 653, 
through Sioux Indian Reservation, S. Dak.). 

Forest City and Watertown R. R. (act Mar. 2, 1889, 25 Stat. L., 852, Sioux 
Indian Reservation, S. Dak.). 

Fremont, Elkhorn and Missouri Valley R. R. (act Jan. 20, 1885, 23 Stat, 
L., 284, through Fort Robinson Military Reservation, Nebr.; act Feb. 
28, 1887,24 Stat. L., 434, through Fort Meade Military Reservation. 
S. Dak.). 

Georgetown, Breckinridge and Leadville Rwy 

Georgetown, Silver Creek and Chicago Lakes Rwy 

Gila Valley, Globe and Northern Rwy 

Glen wood High Line Rwy ' 

Grand ( 'anyon Rwv. Co.*' 



State or Territory. 



Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Colorado and New Mexico. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Michigan. 



Montana. 
Minnesota. 
Minnesota and 

kota. 
Minnesota. 



North Da- 



Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
South Dakota. 
Wisconsin and Michigan. 

Do. 



Minnesota 



South Dakota, 
North Dakota. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 
Alaska. 
Nevada. 
Oregon. 

Wisconsin and Minnesota. 
New Mexico. 
Wyoming. 

Do. 
Utah. 
Colorado. 
New Mexico. 

Do. 
Arizona. 
Oklahoma. 
Alabama. 
Nevada. 
Arkansas. 
Washington. 

Do. 
North Dakota. 

Do. 
Oregon and Washington. 

Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Florida. 
South Dakota. 

Do. 

Nebraska, South Dakota, 
and Wyoming. 



Colorado. 

Do. 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 

Arizona. 



170 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Right of way railroads and wagon roads on public lands under the general act of March 3, 
\ 1875, etc.— Continued. 



Name of company. 



Grand Island and Northern Wyoming R. R 

Grand Island and Wyoming Central R. R 

Grand Valley Rwy 

Grayling, Twin Lakes and Northeastern R. R 

Grays Peak, Snake River and Leadville Rwy 

Great Falls and Canada R \vy 

Great Salt Lake and Hot Springs Rwv 

Great Southern Rwy. (act of June 4, 1872, 17 Stat. L., 224) 

Greeley, Bear River and Pacific R. R. and Telegraph Co . 

Greeley, Salt Lake and Pacific Rwy 

Green River and Northern R. R 

Hanover R. R 

Hazelhurst and Southeastern Rwy 

Helena and Jefferson County R. R 

Helena and Northern Rwy 

Helena and Red Mountain R. R 

Helena, Boulder Valley and Butte R. R 

Houston, Central Arkansas and Northern R. R 

Hutchinson and Southern R. R. (acts of Sept. 26, 1890, 26 Stat. L., 485; 

Feb. 3, 1892, 27 Stat. L., 2; and Aug. 27, 1894, 28 Stat, L., 505, through 

Indian Territory). 
Idaho Central Rwy., now Oregon Short Line and Utah Northern Rwy.. 

Idaho Midland Rwy 

Idaho North and South Rwy 

Idaho Northern Rwy. Co., Limited 

Iron Mountain Rwy 

Iron River Rwy., now Chicago and Northwestern Rwy 

Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile R. R. (act of Mar. 3, 1875, 18 Stat, 

L., 509). 
Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River Rwy. (act July 11, 1890, 

26 Stat. L.. 268, through St. Augustine Military Reservation," Fla.). 

Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Indian River Rwy 

James River Valley R. R 



State or Territory. 



Jamestown and Northern R. R 

Jamestown and Northern Rwy. Extension Co 

Kansas Central R. R 

Kansas City, Fort Smith and Southern Rwv 

Kansas City, Mexico and Orient Rwy. (act Mar. 2, 1899, 31 Stat. L., 990, 

through Indian lands). 
Kansas City, Nevada and Fort Smith R, R., now Kansas City, Pittsburg 

and Gulf R. R. 
Kansas City, Pittsburg and Gulf R. R., successor to Kansas City, Nevada 

and Fort Smith R. R. (acts of Feb. 27, 1892, 27 Stat. L., 487; Mar. 2. 

1895, 28 Stat. L., 744; and Feb. 13, 1896, 29 Stat, L., 6, through Indian 

Territory). 

Kansas City, Springfield and Memphis R. R 

Kansas City, YVatkins and Gulf Rwy , 

Kootenai R. R ' 

Kootenai Valley Rwy 

Lake Michigan and Lake Superior Rwv 

La Plata R. R 

Laramie and Sweetwater Valley Rwy 

Laramie, Hahns Peak and Pacific Rwy 

Laramie, North Park and Pacific R. R. and Telegraph Co , 

Lincoln and Black Hills R. R , 

Lincoln, Denver and Colorado Rwv. 

Little Book Cliff Rwy * 

London, South Park and Leadville R. R 

Lordsburg and Hachita R. R 

Louisiana Western R. R 

Louisville and Nashville R. R.* 

Louisville, New Orleans and Texas Rwy 

Manitou and Pikes Peak Rwy * 

Maricopa and Phoenix R. R.' (act Jan. 17, 1887, 24 Stat. L., 361, through 

Gila River Indian Reservation). 

Menominee Rwy 

Menominee River R. R., now Chicago and Northwestern Rwy 

Midland Terminal Rwv 

Millard (B. F.) et al., Wagon Road (act May 14, 1898, 30 Stat. L., 409).. 

Milwaukee and Northern R. R 

Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Rwy. (act June 4, 1882, 25 Stat. L., 

169, through Lac de Flambeau Indian Reservation, Wis.). 

Minneapolis and St. Cloud R. R 

Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie and Atlantic Rwy 

Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Rwy 

Minnesota and International Rwv 

Minnesota and Manitoba R. R. (act Apr. 17, 1900, 31 Stat. L., 134, through 

Chippewa- Red Lake Indian Reservation, Minn.). 

Missoula and Bitter Root Valley R. R 

Missouri and Arkansas R. R 



Wyoming. 

South Dakota and Nebraska. 

Colorado. 

Michigan. 

Colorado. 

Montana. 

Utah. 

Florida. 

Colorado. 

Do. 
Washington. 
New Mexico. 
Wisconsin. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Louisiana. 
Oklahoma. 



Idaho. 
Do. 
Oregon and Idaho. 
Idaho. 
California, 
Michigan. 
Florida and Alabama. 

Florida. 

Do. 
North Dakota and South 

Dakota, 
South Dakota, 
North Dakota. 
Kansas. 
Missouri. 
Oklahoma. 

Arkansas. 

Do. 



Missouri. 

Louisiana. 

Idaho. 

Do. 

Michigan. 

Colorado. 

Wvoming. 

* Do. 

Do. 
Nebraska. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 
New Mexico. 
Louisiana. 

Alabama and Florida. 
Mississippi. 
Colorado. 
Arizona. 

Wisconsin. 

Michigan. 

Colorado. 

Alaska. 

Michigan. 

Wisconsin. 

Minnesota. 

Michigan and Wisconsin. 
North Dakota. 
Minnesota. 
Do. 

Montana. 

Arkansas and Missouri. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 171 

Right of way railroads and wagon roads on public lands under the general act of March 3 y 

1875, etc.— Continued. 



Name of company. 



State or Territory. 



Missouri, Arkansas and Southern Rwy 

Missouri River, North Platte and Denver Rwy 

Mobile, Jackson and Kansas City R.R 

Montana and Wyoming Eastern R. R 

Montana Central Rwy 

Montana Midland Rwy., now Montana R. R 

Montana R. R., successor to Montana Midland Rwy 

Montana Rwy 

Mount Carbon, Gunnison and Lake City R. R. and Coal Transportation. 

Co. 

Nebraska and Colorado R. R 

Nebraska and Western Rwy 

Nebraska, Wyoming and Western R. R 

Nevada-California-Oregon Rwy 

Nevada Central Rwy 

Nevada County Narrow Gauge R. R. (act of June 20, 1874, 18 Stat. L., 

130). 

Nevada Southern Rwy.. " The " 

Nevada Southern Rwy., First Division 

New Mexico R. R 

New Mexico and Arizona R. R 

New Mexico and Southern Pacific R.R 

New Orleans and Northeastern R. R 

Northern Pacific Rwy. (act July 2, 18G4, 13 Stat. L., 365, land-grant act; 

act July 10, 1882, 22 Stat. L., 157, through Crow Indian Reservation, 

Mont.; act Feb. 20, 1893, 27 Stat. L., 468, through Puyallup Indian 

Reservation, Wash.). 

Northern Pacific and Cascade R. R 

Northern Pacific and Montana R. R 

Northern Pacific and Puget Sound Shore R. R 

Northern Pacific, La Moure and Missouri River R. R 

North Fork Valley and Anthracite Rwy 

North Park and Grand River R. R. and Telegraph Co 

Northwest Rwy 

Oakley and Colby Rwy : 

Ogden and Cache Valley Rwy 

Ogden and Wyoming Rwy 

Oklahoma City and Western R. R. (act Mar. 2, 1899, 31 Stat. L., 990, 

through Indian lands). 

Omaha and Elkhorn Valley Rwy 

Omaha and Republican Valley R. R 

Omaha, Niobrara and Black Hills R. R 

Ontonagon and Brule River R. R 

Ordway, Bismarck and Northwestern Rwy., successor to Aberdeen, 

Bismarck and Northwestern Rwy. 

Oregon and California R. R 

Oregon and Washington Territory R. R., now Washington and Colum- 
bia River Rwy. 
Oregon Railroad and Navigation Co., successor to Oregon Railway and 

Navigation Co. 
Oregon Railway and Navigation Co. (act July 26, 1888, 25 Stat, L., 349, 

through Nez Perces Indian Reservation, Idaho; act Oct. 17, 1888, sec. 

4, 25 Stat. L., 558, through Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oreg. See 

Secretary's decisions in February, April, and August, 1881). Now 

Oregon Railroad and Navigation Co. 

Oregon Railway Extension Co 

Oregon Short Line and Utah Northern Rwy., successors to Oregon Short 

Line Rwy., Idaho Central Rwy., Salt Lake and Western Rwy., Utah 

and Northern Rwy., and Utah Central Rwy., now Oregon Short Line 

R.R. 
Oregon Short Line Rwy., succeeded bv Oregon Short Line and Utah 

Northern Rwy. (act Sept, 1, 1888, 25 Stat. L., 452, through Fort Hall 

Indian Reservation, Idaho), now Oregon Short Line R. R. 

Oregon Southern Rwy 

Oroville and Beckworth R. R 

Oxford and Kansas R.R 

Ozark and Cherokee Central Rwy 

Pacific Alaska Transportation arid Coal Co. (act Mav 14, 1898, 30 Stat. L., 

409).* 
Pacific and Arctic Railway and Navigation Co. of West Virginia (act 

May 14, 1898, 30 Stat. L., 409). 

Pacific and Idaho Northern Rwy 

Palatka and Indian River Rwy 

Pecos Valley and Northeastern Rwy 

Pecos Valley R. R., now Rwy .* 

Pecos Valley Rwy., successor to Pecos Vallev R. R 

Pensacola and Louisville R. R. (act June 8, 1872, 17 Stat. L., 340) 

Pensacola and Mobile R. R 

Phoenix and Eastern R. R 

Pikes Peak Railway and Improvement Co 

Portland, Lower Columbia and Eastern Washington R. R 



Arkansas. 

Nebraska. 

Alabama. 

Idaho and Montana. 

Montana, 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Colorado. 

Nebraska. 
Do. 

Nebraska and Wyoming. 
California and Nevada. 
Nevada. 
California. 

Do. 
Nevada. 
New Mexico. 
Arizona. 
New Mexico. 

Louisiana and Mississippi. 
Wisconsin, Minnesota, North 

Dakota, Montana, Idaho, 

Washington. 

Washington. 
Montana. 
Washington. 
North Dakota. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Oregon. 
Kansas. 
Utah. 

Do. 
Oklahoma. 



Nebraska. 

Do. 

Do. 
Michigan. 
North Dakota and South 

Dakota. 
Oregon. 
Oregon and Washington. 

Oregon. 

Oregon, Washington, and 
Idaho. 



Oregon and Washington. 

Wyoming, Idaho, Oregon, 
Utah, Nevada, and Mon- 
tana. 



Do. 



Oregon. 

California. 

Nebraska, 

Arkansas. 

Alaska. 

Do. 

Idaho. 
Florida. 
New Mexico. 

Do. 

Do. 
Alabama, 

Do. 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 
Washington. 



172 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFTCE. 

Right of way railroads and wagon roads on public lands under the general act of March 3, 

1875, etc. — Continued. 



Name of company. 



Portland, Vancouver and Yakima Rwy 

Prescott and Arizona Central Rwy. (act Feb. 28, 1887, 24 Stat. L., 433, 
through Whipple Barracks Military Reservation, Ariz.). 

Prescott and Eastern K. R 

Princeton and Western Rwv 

Prospect Hill Co 

Pueblo and Arkansas Valley K. R.. successor to Pueblo and Salt Lake 
Rwy. (right of way through Fort Lyon Military Reservation. See 
Secretary's decision. Nov. 28, 1876). 

Pueblo and Salt Lake Rwy., now Pueblo and Arkansas Valley R. R 

Pueblo and Silver Cliff Rwy 

Pueblo and State Line R. R 

Pueblo, Gunnison and Pacific R. R 

Puget Sound and Chehalis R. R 

Puget Sound and Grays Harbor Railroad and Transportation Co 

Puget Sound, Skasrit and Eastern Rwv 

Puyallup Valley Rwy. (act July 26, 1888. 25 Stat, L.,530, through Puyal- 
lup Indian Reservation. Wash.). 

Rapid Citv, Harney Peak and Southwestern Rwv 

Rapid City, Missouri River and St. Paul R. R 

Red River and Lake of the Woods Rwy 

Republic and Kettle River Rwy 

Republican Valley and Wyoming R. R 

Republican Vallev R. R . .'. 

Rio Grande R. R 

Rio Grande Branch Line R. R 

Rio Grande Gunnison Rwv 

Rio Grande Junction Rwy. (act Oct. 1, 1890, 26 Stat. L., 664, through 
Grand Junction Indian School Reservation). 

Rio Grande, Mexico and Pacific R. R. (act Mav 18, 1886, 24 Stat. L., 68. 
through Fort Selden Military Reservation; act Feb. 1, 1894, 28 Stat. L., 
34, through Fort Cummings Military Reservation) . 

Rio Grande, Pagosa and Northern R. R 

Rio Grande. Pueblo and Southern R. R 

Rio Grande Sangre de Cristo R. R 

Rio Grande Southern R. R. (act Sept, 28, 1890, 26 Stat. L., 489. through 
Fort Lewis Military Reservation. Colo.). 

Rio Grande and Southwestern R. R.* 

Rio Grande Western Rwv., successor to Denver and Rio Grande Western 
Rwy. 

Road Canon R. R 

Rocky Fork and Cooke City Rwy. (act Mar. 3, 1887, 24 Stat. L., 545, 
through Crow Indian Reservation, Mont.). 

Rockv Mountain R. R 

St. Anthony R. R 

St. Augustine and South Beach Rwy 

St. Cloud and Lake Traverse Rwy 

St. Louis and North Arkansas R. R 

St. Louis, Wichita and Western Rwy 

St. Paul and Dakota R. R., now Worthington and Sioux Falls R. R 

St. Paul and Northern Pacific Rwy 

St. Paul and Sioux Citv Rwv '. 

St. Paul, Black Hills and Pacific Rwv 

St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Rwy. (act Feb. 15. 1887, 24 Stat. L.< 
402, through Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, N. Dak.; Blackfeet 
Indian Reservation, Assinniboine Military Reservation, and Fort Peck 
Indian Agencv. Mont., and Fort Buford Militarv Reservation, N. Dak. 
and Mont.; act Feb. 25. 1889, 25 Stat. L.,696, through White Iiarth In- 
dian Reservation. Minn.; acts July is, 1894, 28 Stat, L., 112, Feb. 23, 
1897,29 Stat. L., 592, through White Earth, Leech Lake, Chippewa, and 
Fond du Lac Indian reservations, Minn.; act Mar. 2. 1897, 29 Stat. L., 
600, through Fort Spokane Militarv Reservation, Wash.). 

St. Vrain R. R 

Salmon River R. R 

Salt Lake and Deep Creek Rwy 

Salt Lake and Eastern R. R 

Salt Lake and Eastern Rwy 

Salt Lake and Mercur R. R 

Salt Lake and Park City Rwy 

Salt Lake and Western Rwy.. succeeded by Oregon Short Line and Utah 
Northern Rwy., now Oregon Short Line R. R. 

Salt Lake Valley and Eastern Rwy 

Sanborn, Cooperstown and Turtle Mountain R. R 

San Francisco and Ocean Shore R, R 

San Francisco and Ocean Shore R. R.. Second Division 

San Joaquin and Mount Diablo R. R. (act Aug. 4, 1852, 10 Stat. L., 28) 

San Joaquin Valley and Yosemite R. R 

San Juan and Pagosa Springs R. R 

San Pablo and Tulare Extension R. R 

San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake R. R 

San Pete Vallev R. R 



State or Territory. 



Washington. 
Arizona. 

Do. 
Wisconsin. 
Oregon. 
New Mexico and Colorado. 



Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Washington. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

South Dakota. 

Do. 
Minnesota. 
Washington. 
Nebraska. 

Do. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

New Mexico. 



Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 
New Mexico and Colorado. 

New Mexico 

Utah and Colorado. 

Colorado. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Idaho. 

Florida, 

Minnesota. 

Arkansas. 

Kansas. 

Minnesota. 
Do. 

South Dakota. 

North Dakota. 

North Dakota, Montana, 
Washington, South Da- 
kota, Minnesota, and 
Idaho. 



Colorado. 

Idaho. 

Utah. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

North Dakota. 
California. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Utah and California. 
Utah. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 173 

Right of way railroads and wagon roads on public lands under the general act of March 3, 

1875, etc. — Continued. 



Name of company 



Santa Fe Pacific R. R. (see land-grant acts July 27, 1866, 14 Stat, L.,292, 
and Mar. 3. 1897, 29 Stat. L., 622). 

Santa Fe, Prescott and Phoenix Rvvy. (act Feb. 18, 1893, 27 Stat. L., 462, 
through Whipple Barracks Military Reservation, Ariz.). 

Satsop R. R 

Seattle and International R wy 

Seattle and Montana Rwy 

Seattle and West Coast Rvvy 

Seattle, Boise and Salt Lake Rvvy 

Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Rwy 

Sevier Rvvy 

Sevier Valley Rwy 

Shingle Springs and Placerville R. R 

Sierrra Valley and Mohawk R. R 

Silver City and Northern R. R 

Silver City, Deming and Pacific R. R 

Silverton R. R 

Sioux City Northwestern Rvvy 

Snake River Valley Rwy '. 

Snohomish, Skvkomish and Spokane Railway and Transportation Co... 

South Dakota Western Rwy 

Southern Kansas and Panhandle R, R 

Southern Kansas and Western R. R 

Southern Kansas Rwy., successor to Burlington, Kansas and South- 
western R. R. (act July 4, 1884, 23 Stat. L., 73, through Indian Terri- 
tory). 

Southern Pacific R. R, of Arizona 

Southern Pacific R. R. of California (act Mar. 3, 1871, sec. 23, 16 Stat. L.. 
573; act Aug. 15, 1894, 28 Stat. L., 335, sec. 17, through Yuma Indian 
Reservation, Cal.). 

Southern Pacific R. R. of New Mexico 

South Pacific Coast R. R 

Spanish Range Rwy 

Spokane and Palouse Rwy. (act May 8, 1890, 26 Stat, L., 104, through 
Nez Perces Indian Reservation, Idaho. See 22 L. D., 647). 

Spokane Falls and Idaho R. R 

Spokane Falls and Northern Rwy. (act May 8, 1890, 26 Stat. L., 102, 
through Colville Indian Reservation, Wash.). 

Springfield and Memphis R. R 

Springfield and Southern Rwy 

Springfield, Yellville and White River R. R 

Sultan Valley Rwy 

Summit County R. R., now Echo and Park City Rwy 

Summit County Railway and Transportation Co., now Wyoming, Salt 
Lake and California Rwy. 

Sumpter and Bourne Rwy' 

Sumpter Valley Rw v 

Sunset R. R 

Tacoma, Elllensburg and Conconully Rwy 

Tacoma, Orting and Southeastern R. R . . . 

Texarkana and Fort Smith Rwy 

Tintic Range Rwy 

Trinidad and Denver R. R 

Trinidad, San Luis Valley and Pacific Rwy 

Tucson, Globe and Northern R. R.$ successor to Arizona Narrow Gauge 
R. R. 

Uinta Coal R. R 

Uintah Railway Co. * 

Union Pacific and Western Colorado Rvvy 

Union Pacific and Western Colorado Rwy. of Wyoming 

Union Pacific, 1 >enver and Gulf Rwy., successor to Colorado Central R. R. 

Union Pacific, Lincoln and Colorado Rwy 

Union Pacific R. R 

United Railroads of Washington 

United Verde and Pacific Rwy 

Upper Arkansas, San Juan and Pacific Rwy 

Utah and Northern Rwy., successor to R. R. (acts of Mar. 3, 1873. 17 
Stat. L., 612, and June 20, 1878, 20 Stat. L.,241 i.now Oregon Short Line 
and Utah Northern Rwy. (acts July 3, 1882, 22 Stat. L., 148, and Sept, 1, 
1888, 25 Stat, L., 452, through Fort Hall Indian Reservation, Idaho). 

Utah and Pacific R. R 

Utah and Wyoming Central Rwy 

Utah and Wyoming R. R ..'. 

Utah and Wyoming R. R. "The " 

Utah and Wyoming Rwy 

Utah < 'en t nil R. R ' 

Utah Central Rwy., successor to R. R. (act of Dec. 15, 1870, 16 Stat. L., 
395), now Oregon Short Line and Utah Northern Rwy. 

Utah Eastern R. R 

Utah Eastern Rwy 

Utah, Nevada and California R. R 



State or Territory. 



Arizona and New Mexico. 
Arizona. 

Washington. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Idaho. 
Washing-ton. 
Utah. 

Do. 
California. 

Do. 
New Mexico. 

Do. 
Colorado. 
Nebraska. 
Washington. 

Do. 
South Dakota. 
Kansas. 

Do. 
Nebraska, Kansas, and Okla- 
homa. 



Arizona. 
California. 



New Mexico. 

California, 

Colorado. 

Idaho and Washington. 

Do. 
Washington. 

Arkansas. 
Missouri. 
Arkansas. 
Washington. 
Utah. 
Do. 



Oregon. 

Do. 
California, 
Washington. 

Do. 
Arkansas. 
Utah. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Arizona. 

Wyoming. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 

Wyoming and Colorado. 
Colorado and Kansas. 
Utah and Wyoming. 
Washington. 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 
Idaho, Montana, and Utah. 



Utah. 

Do. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
Utah. 

Do. 

Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



174 EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Right of way railroads and wagon roads on public lands under the general act of March 3, 

1875, etc. — Continued. 



Name of company. 



State or Territory. 



Utah, Nevada and California R. R. (of California) 

Utah Rwy 

Utah Southern Extension R. R., now Oregon Short Line and Utah North- 
ern Rwy. 

Utah Southern R. R., now Oregon Short Line and Utah Northern Rwy. 

Utah Western Rwy., " The " 

Utah Western Rwy 

Wadena and Park Rapids R. R 

Wallace and Sunset R. R 

Wardner Mining R. R 

Wasatch Iron and Coal Co 

Washington and Columbia River Rwy., successor to Oregon and Wash- 
ington Territory R. R. 

Washington and Great Northern Rwy 

Washington and Idaho R. R. (act May 30, 1888, 25 Stat. L., 160, through 
Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho). 

Washington Central Rwy 

Washington Dalles R. R. 

Watertown and Lake Kampeska Rwy 

Watertown. Sioux City and Duluth R. R 

Weiser and Idaho Northern Rwy. Co. (Limited) 

Wet Mountain Valley R. R 

White River Rwy . . .' 

Wichita and Western R. R 

Willamette Valley and Coast R. R 

Wilmar and Sioux Falls Rwy 

Winona, Alma and Northern Rwy 

Winters and Ukiah Rwy 

Wisconsin and Michigan R. R 

Wisconsin Central R. R 

Worthington and Sioux Falls R. R., successor to St. Paul and Dakota R. R 

Wyoming and Eastern Rwy 

Wyoming and Western Rwy 

Wyoming Central Rwy. (right of way through Fort Fetterman Military 

Reservation. See Secretary's decision, Dec. 29, 1885). 
Wyoming, Montana and Pacific R. R. (act May 17, 1880, 21 Stat. L., 141, 

through Fort Russell and Fort Laramie Military Reservations, Wyo.). 
Wyoming, Salt Lake and California Rwy., successor to Summit County 

Rwy. and Transportation Co. 

Wyoming Western R. R 

Wyoming Southern R. R 

Yosemite Valley R. R 

Zuni Mountain Rwy 



California. 
Utah. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Minnesota. 
Idaho. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
Washington. 

Do. 



and 



Washington, Idaho, 
Montana. 

Washington. 
Do. 

South Dakota. 
Do. 

Idaho. 

Colorado. 

Arkansas. 

Kansas. 

Oregon. 

Minnesota and South Da- 
kota. 

Wisconsin. 

California, 

Michigan and Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Minnesota. 

Wvoming. 

Utah. 

Wyoming. 

Do. 

Utah. 

Wvoming. 

Do. 
California. 
New Mexico. 



Total number of companies listed, 513; number of separate companies, 486. 

RIGHT OF WAY FOR IRRIGATION AND OTHER PURPOSES. 



Sections 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the act of Congress approved March 
3, 1891 (26 Stat. L., 1095), as amended by section 2 of the act of May 
11, 1898 (30 Stat. L. , 104), grant right of way over the public lands 
and reservations of the United States for canals, ditches, and reser- 
voirs for purposes of irrigation and for purposes of a public nature; 
also for purposes of water transportation, for domestic purposes, or 
for the development of power, as subsidiary to the main purpose of 
irrigation. Such rights of way may be applied for by corporations, 
individuals, or associations of individuals in accordance with certain 
requirements as to the tiling of papers and maps. 

The regulations require the application to show with certainty the 
location of the proposed canal or reservoir, so that the approved 
map will be an accurate record of the extent of the right of way, and 
thus define clearly the rights granted by the act and those of future 
settlers along the ditch or reservoir. 

Under the provisions of this act right of way has been approved to 
579 companies, individuals, and associations of individuals, of which 
138 received their first approval during the past } T ear. 



REPOKT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 175 

There have been receiv r ed during the year 46^ maps, which, with 
those already pending, made a total of 561 maps on hand for action 
during the year; of these 151 have been approved, 20 have been filed 
(not requiring approval), and 288 have been otherwise disposed of, a 
few of which were rejected, the rest being returned for correction, 
leaving 102 waiting action June 30, 1904. 

Instructions for preparing applications for right of way for irriga- 
tion purposes will be found in the circular of June 26, 1902. 

A' list of the applicants that have had maps approved under said acts 
is given in the following table, with references to various special acts 
passed for the benefit of said applicants: 

Right of may granted for irrigation canals and reservoirs in certain States and Territories 
'under act of March 3, 1891 {26 Stat. L., 1095), and section 2, act Mag 11, 1898 (30 
Stat. L., 404), with references to various special acts applicable to the applicants. 

[The * indicates that right of way was first approved during the past year.] 



Name. 



State or 
Territory. 



Abelin ( Gustaf P. ) Reservoir 

Adams. (G. S.) and Bunker (M. A.) Reservoir 

Agua Fria Water and Land Co 

Alfred Ditch 

Algadones Irrigation Co. (act of Jan. 20, 1893, 27 Stat. L., 420, through Yuma Indian 
Reservation). 

Alpine Land and Reservoir Co 

American Valley Water Storage and Irrigation Co 

Andrews (J. D. )* Canal and Reservoir 

Annabella Reservoir and Irrigation Association 

Antelope Reservoir. (A. J. Eaton) 

Antelope Valley Water Co 

Appleton Reservoir and Canal* -. 

Arbuckle (Frank and Emma A.) and Billings (Jabez P.) Reservoirs* 

Arizona Canal Co., now Arizona Water Co 

Arizona Water Co., successor to Arizona Canal Co 

Armstrong (C. C. ) Reservoir 

Arrowhead Reservoir Co 

Ashley Lake Irrigating Co 

Austin ( H . C. ) Reservoir 

Austin ( Jas. H. ) Reservoir and Ditch 

Austin (Lyman A.) Reservoir and Ditch 

Badger ( Hannibal J. ) Reservoirs and Ditch 

Bain (Chas. ) Reservoir * 

Bain (John C. ) Reservoir 

Balman (Thos. G. ) Reservoir 

Barnes (E. M. ) Reservoir and Canal 

Barr Reservoir 

Barry ( M. P. ) Reservoirs * 

Battlement Reservoir Co , 

Bayley (Geo. H.) Reservoir * 

Bear Creek Reservoir and Canal and Flume Line* 

Beatty (Theodore Bruce) Reservoir and Canal 

Beaver Brook Reservoir and Canal Co 

Beaver Park Reservoirs and Canal 

Beaver River Irrigation Co 

Beecher (W.J.) Reservoir and Canals * 

Bennett (Jasper and F. M.) & Ritter (Geo.) Reservoir and Ditch* 

Best (Alex. D.) Reservoirs 

Bickerdyke ( Hiram D. ) Canal and Reservoir 

Big Creek Reservoir and Ditch 

Big Horn Basin Development Co • ' 

Big Pine Surplus Water Storage Co 

Black (Peter T. ) Reservoir and Canals 

Blackstone (John D. ) Reservoir 

Blankenbaker ( Virgil F. ) Reservoirs 

Blue Creek Canal and Reservoir Co 

Blue Lake Reservoir and Canal 

Blue Water Land and Irrigation Co 

Boise City and Nampa Irrigation, Land, and Lumber Co 

Bonefield (Julia S.) Reservoir and Canals - 

Bonita Reservoir * 

Bonnie Ditch and Reservoir Co 

Boothroyd (C. E.) Reservoir * 

Boulder High Line Canal Co 

Bowes ( Frank ) Reservoir 

Bozeman Creek Reservoir Co 

Bradford ( Donald ) Reservoir and Canal System * 



Montana. 

Colorado. 

Arizona. 

Colorado. 

Arizona. 

California. 

New Mexico. 

Arizona. 

Utah. 

Colorado. 

California. 

South Dakota. 

Colorado. 

Arizona. 

Do. 
Montana. 
California, 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
Oregon. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Montana. 
Utah. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Utah. 
Montana. 
Oregon. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Wyoming. 
California. 
Utah. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Utah. 

Do. 
New Mexico. 
Idaho. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
North Dakota. 
Colorado. 
.Montana, 

Do. 

Do. 



176 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Right of way granted for irrigation canals and reservoirs in certain States and Territories 
under act of March 3, 1891, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



Brady (Thomas E.) Canal and Reservoir 

Brockman ( Fred ) Reservoir * 

Brown (Walter) Reservoirs 

Brubaker (S. J.) and Moorman (E. W.) Reservoir 

Bruster (John ) Reservoir and Ditches 

Buckhorn Reservoir 

Buckley ( Patrick ) Reservoir 

Burg (Chas. ) Reservoir * 

Burnett (Stella C.) Reservoir and Ditch 

Bye (Oluf J.) Reservoir and Canal* 

Bye (O. J. and G. M. ) Reservoir and Canal * 



Cache Valley Canal Co 

Caldwell (C. J. ) Reservoirs and Canals 

Calley and McCallister Ditch Co 

Canon Creek Reservoir Co 

Canyon ( 'anal Co. ( Limited) 

Can von ( 'reek Reservoir Co 

Carter (J. W., P. C, G. W., and S.) Reservoir and Ditch 

Carter ( Stewart) Reservoir and Ditch 

Central Canal Co 

Chaffee County Ditch and Canal Co 

Chevelon Irrigation Co 

Chicala Water Co 

Cimarron and Uncompahgre Valley Canal and Reservoir Co. 

Claflin (William) Reservoirs and Canal 

Claremont Land and Irrigation Co 

Clark (J. M.) Reservoir 

Clark ( Peter A. ) Reservoir 

Clear Creek Reservoir 

Clear Lake Reservoir and Canal 

Coal Creek Reservoir Co. * 

Colorado Colony Ditch Co 

Colorado Consolidated Land and Water Co 

Colorado Land and Water Co 

Columbia Colonization Co. (formerly Victor Reservoir Co.) .. 

Columbine Ditches 

Columbine Reservoir and Investment Co. * 

( !< mrad Investment Co 

Consolidated Reservoir and Ditch 

Consolidated Reservoir Co 

Cook (William W. and John A.) Reservoir and Ditches ... 

Cornwell ( Robt. L. ) Reservoirs 

Corn well (Robt. L. ) and Carlson (O. W.) Reservoirs 

Courtright (Geo. W. ) Reservoir and Channel " 

Cowan ( David) Reservoir and Ditch 

Cowychee Reservoir and Canal Co 

Cox'(L. S.) Reservoir (River Dale Reservoir) 

Coyote Reservoir and Canal 

Cra f t< .n Water Co 

Crafts (David) Reservoir and Canal 

Craig (E. H. and J. R, ) Ditch and Reservoir 

Crandall (Amanda E.) Reservoir 

Crane Lake Reservoir and Supply Ditch * 

Crater Storage Reservoir No. 2 *. . 

Craterville Mining and Water Co.* 

Crescent Reservoir * .- 

Cressler ( W. T. ) Reservoir * 

Crigler ( E. S. ) Ditch 

Crittenden Canals 

Crow Creek Reservoirs and Canals 

Crowley (J. W.) Reservoir and Canal 

Cull (Seaton T. ) Ditch 

Cushing ( Thos. | Reservoir* 

Cutting & Patten Reservoir and Ditch* 

c. W. (Charles Wolf) Ditch and Reservoir 

I )a ley ( Thos. H. ) Reservoir and Ditches * 

Dane Reservoir and Ditch 

Danhauser (John) Ditch and Reservoir 

Dannhauser (Joseph) Ditch and Reservoir 

Danks (M. O.) and Dick (Wm. T.) Irrigating Ditch 

Darling (M. A.) Reservoir 

Davey (Albert ) Reservoir 

Davidson (George) Reservoir 

Davidson (Jas. D.) Reservoir and Ditch* 

Davis Bros. (Geo. A. and Fred. G.) Reservoirs and Canals*... 

Davis and Weber Counties Canal Co 

Davis (Edwin W.) Reservoir No. 4 

Dawson (L. J.) Ditches and Reservoir 

Delta (city of), Colorado, Water Works * 



State or 
Territory. 



Montana. 

Colorado. 

Montana. 

California. 

Washington. 

California. 

Montana. 

Colorado. 

Do. 
Montana. 
South Dakota 
and Montana* 
Idaho. 
California. 
New Mexico. 
California. 
Idaho. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 
California. 
Colorado. 
Arizona. 
California. 
Colorado. 
Arizona. 
Oklahoma. 
Idaho. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Utah. 
Colorado. 
Wyoming. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
California. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Wyoming. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 
California. 
Montana. 
Washington. 
Colorado. 
Arizona. 
California. 
Utah. 
California. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Oklahoma. 
Montana. 
Nevada. 
Nebraska. 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 
California. 

Do. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 

Do. 
California. 

Do. 
Oklahoma. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
South Dakota. 
Utah. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 177 

Right of way granted for irrigation canals and reservoirs in certain States and Territories 
under act of March S, 1891, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



State or 
Territory. 



Deramon (John) Reservoir 

Denver Power and Irrigation Co 

De Remer (J. R. and J. S.) et al. Canal and Pipe Line * 

Deschutes Reclamation and Irrigation Co 

Deseret and Salt Lake Agricultural and Manufacturing Canal Co 

Deseret Irrigation Co. (Fool Creek Reservoirs and Can&l) 

Desert Lake Reservoir and Irrigation Co 

Divide Creek High Line Ditch Co.* 

Doggie Creek Reservoir and Ditch 

Donald ( Albert A. ) Reservoir * 

Dorris (R. D. ) Reservoir and Canals 

Dorrity (James B.) Reservoir 

Doughty ( P. ) Reservoirs * 

Drabbs (Sarah A. ) Ditch * 

Drabbs (Septimus) Reservoir * 

Dry Creek Reservoir and Supply Ditch * 

Duck Lake Reservoir * 

Dunbar ( Fred G.) Reservoir * 

Dunbar Reservoir 

Durell (B. S. and Alonzo) Reservoir and Ditch * 

Eagar Irrigation Co 

East Park Storage Reservoir 

Elizabeth Lake Reservoir Co 

Elk Creek Reservoir No. 1 

Elk Creek Reservoir No. 2 

Elliott (Owa V. ) Reservoirs * 

Elma Reservoir and Irrigation Co. (Limited) * 

Elmore County Irrigation Co 

Emerson (Thomas) Reservoir and Ditch 

Entiat Improvement Co 

Escondido Irrigation District 

Essex and Salisbury Reservoir and Ditch 

Etiwanda Water Co 

Eureka Ditch System * 

Eureka Reservoir 

Eureka Reservoir, Canal, and Irrigation Co 

Fall River System < if Reservoirs* 

Farmers' ('anal Co 

Farmers' Irrigating Ditch Co.* 

Fee (James) Reservoir and Ditches 

Ferguson (Robert) Ditches and Reservoir 

First New Mexico Reservoir and Irrigation Co 

Florida Canal Co.* 

Fogarty (Edmond) Reservoir 

Ford (J. Martin) Ditch 

Forder Ditch 

Forest Reservoir * 

Fort Laramie South Side Ditch 

Fox (James E.) Reservoir 

Fremont Mining and. Development Co * 

Frog Lake Reservoir 

Gardiner (John ) and Mecham ( Alvarus) Reservoir 

Garland ( Richard W. ) Reservoirs 

Geneva Fa 1 Is Reservoir 

Glover and Force Canal 

Gloyn (Fred ) Reservoir 

Gould ( Henry) Reservoir * 

Gower ( Noah) Ditch and Reservoirs 

Grand Mesa Reservoir Co 

Granger (Arthur R.) Reservoir 

Granite Coulee Reservoir and Ditch 

Grantham (Thomas) Canals and Reservoirs 

Grape Creek Reservoir 

Grass Lake Reservoir 

Grass Valley Land, Loan, and Irrigation Co 

Gray (William) Reservoir 

Great Plains Water Co 

Greenback Grave Reservoir * 

Greenberg ( D. W.) Reservoir 

Griffin (James E. ) Ditch and Reservoir 

Griffith ( Walter S. ) Reservoir 

Grindstone Reservoir and Ditch 

( Jrizzly Reservoir * 

Groesbeck (Frank B.) Reservoir 

Gross Canal and Reservoir (relinquished) 

Hale Reservoir * 

Haley (( )ra ) Ditches 

Halverson ( Hiram) Reservoir 

Hamilton Irrigation Co., now Los Angeles Mountain Water Co. .. 
Hammer (Thos. A. and Henrv) Reservoir* 



Montana. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Oregon. 
Utah. 

Do. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 

Do. 
California. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Arizona. 
Utah. 
California. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Montana. 
Idaho. 

Do. 
Colorado. 
Washington. 
California. 

Do. 

Do. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Colorado. 
Nebraska. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Colorado. 
New Mexico. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Oklahoma. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Utah. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Idaho. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Idaho. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 
Colorado. 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
Montana. 
California. 
North Dakota. 



'70—04- 



-12 



178 EEPOKT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Right of way granted for irrigation canals and reservoirs in certain States and Territories 
under act of March 3, 1891, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



State or 
Territory. 



Haughey (G. M. and E. V.) Reservoir and Ditch * 

Havre Reservoir and Ditch 

Hebbelmann (Herman) Reservoir and Ditch 

Hecht (Charles) Ditches and Reservoirs 

Henderson (Thomas) Reservoirs 

Henry Investment Co 

Hermes-Bosch Reservoir and Ditch 

Hermes-.Tohn.son Reservoir 

Hermes (Maria) Ditch 

Herren (Geo. W. ) Ditch 

High Line Reservoir Co 

Hilton (Chas. E. and Geo.) Reservoir and Ditches* 

Hinsdale Canal 

Hoge (James M. ) Storage Ditch and Reservoir 

Holbrook Land and Water Co 

Holden (Walter) Reservoir 

Holmen-Houts Reservoir and Canals 

Holmer- Flagler Reservoir 

Horse Creek Irrigating Canal and Reservoir 

Howe (C. O. ) Reservoir 

Howell (Geo. W. ) Reservoir and Ditch * 

Hudson Reservoir and Canal Co. (act Feb. 15, 1897, 29 Stat. L., 527, through Gila River 
Indian Reservation, Ariz.). 

Huning (Henry) Reservoir , 

Huntington Canal and Agricultural Association 

Hurst (Wm. D. ) Reservoirs * 

Independence Ditch 

Inyo Canal Co 

Irrigation Land and Improvement Co.* 

Jack (Edwin) et al. Reservoir* 

Jaritas Ditch and Reservoir Co 

JefTers (Jos. M.) Reservoir* 

J. M. (John Meyer) Ditch and Reservoir 

J. M. (John Meyer) Reservoir Outlet Ditch 

Johnson ( L. A. ) Reservoir * 

Jones (Lyman ) Reservoir 

Kearney Lake Reservoir Co 

Kehmeier ( Wm. F. ) Reservoir * 

Kepple (Nellie) Reservoir * 

Kern Rand Co 

Kern River Co 

Kern Valley Water Co 

Kerr ( Donal ) Reservoir * 

Kilgore (Mary L. ) Reservoir *. 

Kitson (T. E.) Reservoir* 

Koger (Thos. D.) Reservoir and Canal* 

Kress ( F. G. ) Ditch * 

Laguna Canal Co 

La Joya Ditch and Reservoir 

La Junta and Lamar Canal Co 

La Junta Canal Co 

Lake Canal 

Lake Hemet Water Co 

Lake Koen Navigation Reservoir and Irrigation Co 

Lamar Land and Canal Co 

Lauchbury ( Emma and Thomas ) Reservoir and Canal 

Lauer (E. ) Ditches and Reservoir 

Lawrence Canal and Reservoirs 

Leamington Water and Land Co 

Le Noir (James L.) Reservoir 

Lens ( Adam) Reservoir 

Leone Reservoir 

Lewis ( G. W. and Q. A. ) et al. Reservoir and Ditches * 

Lincke ( H. Hugo) Reservoir 

Little Deschutes Irrigation Co 

Loch Lomond System of Reservoirs* 

Lohman Reservoir 

Lone Cone Ditch Co.* 

Long (Catherine T.) Reservoir 

Longs Peak Reservoir and Irrigation Co 

Long Valley Reservoir * ' 

Lopez Reservoir 

Los Angeles Mountain Water Co., successor to Hamilton Irrigation Co 

Lowell ( Wm. ) Reservoir and Ditch 

Lowell (Wm. C.) and Pulse (Wm. J.) Reservoir and Ditch* 

Loyd (Saml. C. ) Reservoir 

Lucerne Canal and Power Co 

Lucerne Land and Water Co , 

Luna Irrigation Co 

.Luse (John W.) Ditch and Reservoir 



Colorado. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Montana. 
Wvoming. 
Utah. 
Montana. 
California. 
Montana. 
Wyoming. 
Arizona. 
California. 
Arizona. 

Do. 
Utah. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Arizona. 
South Dakota. 
New Mexico. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 
California. 
Wyoming. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
California. 

Do. 

Do. 
North Dakota 
Oregon. 
Colorado. 
South Dakota. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Kansas. 
Colorado. 
Wyoming. 
California. 
Nebraska and 

Wyoming. 
Utah. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Montana. 
Oregon. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Arizona. 
California. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
Utah. 
Arizona. 
Montana. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 179 

Rigid of way granted for irrigation canals and reservoirs in certain States and Territories 
under act of March 3, 1891, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



State or 
Territory, 



Lyon (Bion K.) Twin Reservoirs 

Lytle (Clark) Reservoir 

MacRae (Donald A.) Reservoir and Ditch* 

MeBride (Wm. ) Reservoir* , 

McKenzie (G. F. ) Reservoir* 

McLaren (John^ Reservoir 

McLean ( Duncan ) Reservoir 

McLeish (Dorothy) Reservoir * 

Mabee ( Harriett M.) Ditch and Reservoir 

Mabee (Wm. W. ) Reservoir 

Magnum Reservoir 

Mahoney (John ) Reservoir and Ditch 

Mairs ( O. I. ) and Key (Thos. W. ) Reservoirs 

Malheur and Harney Lake Irrigation and Land Co 

Mammoth Canal and Reservoir Co 

Mammoth Reservoir, now Mammoth Reservoir Co 

Manney ( Frank J. ) Reservoirs 

Marlow (T. A. ) Reservoir and Ditch 

Marquand (Theodore F. ) Reservoir and Ditches 

Martin (Wm. H. ) Reservoir 

Meadow Reservoir 

Mecham ( Alvarus) Reservoir 

Melville, Ray and Letcher Reservoir and Canal 

Melz ( Albert) Reservoir 

Memminger (Louisa A.) Reservoir* 

Mesa ('reek Reservoir and Canal Co.* 

Midland Canal Reservoir and Land Co 

Miller (J. E.) Reservoir 

Mills ( Lincoln H.) Reservoir 

Milner Pass Ditch System * 

Minnie Reservoir and Ditch 

Mitchells Reservoir and Ditches 

Montana Water Electric Power and Mining Co 

Mon tg< unery Reservoir and Ditch , 

Morrison (S*. W. ) Irrigation System 

Morton (John S. ) Reservoir 

Mountain View Ditch and Reservoir 

Mount Lincoln Land and Water Co 

Mount Nebo Reservoir 

Mount Tecarte Land and Water Co 

Mount Whitney Power Co 

Mullins Canal and Reservoir Co 

Murrav ( Charles ) Reservoir 

Myers ( D. E.) Pipe Line 

Neal (John H. ) Reservoir, Ditches, and Laterals 

Neece ( Wm. M.) Reservoir* 

Neilson and Collar Reservoir 

Nelson ( Edmund) Reservoir 

Nelson (Fred ) Reservoir* 

Nelson ( H. H. ) Reservoirs 

Nelson ( W. H. ) Reservoirs 

Neponset Land and Live Stock Co 

Neubert (Cyrus T.) Reservoir 

New Empire Reservoir and Canal * 

Nicholls (Stephen) et al. Ditch * 

Nippel (Edward) Reservoir and Irrigation Ditch 

Nohle ( A. F. ) Reservoir and Ditch * 

North Delta Canal Co. * 

North Fork Reservoir * 

Northern Pacific, Yakima and Kittitas Irrigation Co 

North Point Consolidated Irrigation Co 

North Poudre Irrigation Co. * 

Norval Flat Reservoir 

Nun Creek Reservoir and Supply Ditch Co. * 

Nystrom ( August) et al. Reservoir 

O'Hanlon (Henry J.) Reservoirs 

Okie (J. B. ) Reservoir and Ditch 

Oleson (Christopher) Reservoir 

Oneal (Hugh) and Baupre (Henry) Reservoir and Ditch*.. 

Onion Valley Reservoir 

Otero Canal Co 

Otter Creek Reservoir Co 

Palmdale Irrigation Co 

Palmer (Noah) and Halliday (Danl.) Drains and Pipe Line 

Parker ( Frank D.) Reservoirs 

Park Reservoir Co. * 

Parsons ( Wm S. ) Reservoir * 

Partridge (Geo. L. ) Reservoir 

Patterson (Edith B.) Reservoir 

Patterson (John F. ) Reservoir 

Pawnee Water Storage Co. * 



Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
California. 
Oregon. 
Utah. 

Do. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Arizona. 
Montana. 
Arizona. 
Utah. 

Do. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Idaho. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Wyoming. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Utah. 
California. 

Do. 
Idaho. 
Montana. 
California. 
Oregon. 
Colorado. 
Utah. 
Arizona. 
Montana. 

Do. 
California. 
Utah. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Washington. 
Utah. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
South Dakota. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Utah. 
California. 

Do. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
North Dakota. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 
Colorado. 



180 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Right of way granted for irrigation canals and reservoirs in certain States and Territories 
under act of March 3, 1891, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



State or 
Territory. 



Payne (H. G. and C.) Reservoir and Ditch 

Pearson (John D. ) Reservoir 

Pecos Irrigation and Improvement Co 

Peers ( Ezekiel ) Reservoir and Canal * 

Perry (Clarence R. ) Reservoir 

Phillips (Benjamin D.) Reservoirs 

Pilot Butte Development Co 

Pima Land and Water Co. (act Feb. 25, 1889, 25 Stat. L., 693, through Fort Lowell 
Military Reservation). 

Pine Valley Consolidated Water and Land Co 

Pioneer Canal Co 

Piru Creek Reservoir (relinquished) 

Platteville Reservoir 

Pleasant Valley Farmers' Mutual Canal and Land Co 

Pocatello Water Co., Limited 

Ponsford (William J. ) Reservoir 

Pope (Hamilton) and Shoman ( Henry) Reservoir 

Potter (Edward and Clyde) Reservoir and Ditch * 

Potter (J. J. and T. T. ) Reservoir and Canal 

Powell ( Edwd. ) Reservoir 

Prescott (A. K. ) Reservoirs 

Price ( Maurice C. ) Reservoir * 

Pugsley ( Leonard D. ) Reservoir 

Pugsley (M. F. ) Reservoir 

Pulse ( Wm. J.) Reservoir and Ditch 

Purser (E. T. ) Reservoirs and Ditches 

Putnam ( George ) Reservoirs and Ditch 

Ramah Land and Irrigation Co. * 

Red Creek Ditch and Reservoir* 

Red Rock Reservoir 

Reed and Houle Reservoirs 

Reser (Bertha G. ) Reservoir 

Revenue Ranch and Water Co 

Reynolds Reservoir and Ditches 

Ritchville Ditch and Reservoir Co 

Rillito Canal Co 

Rio Grande Dam and Irrigation Co 

Rio Verde Canal Co 

Ripley ( Ben ) Reservoir * 

Roberts ( H. M. ) Reservoir 

Roberts ( Wm. R.) Reservoir and Ditch 

Roby (Amelia M.) Reservoir 

Rock Creek and Piney Reservoir and Ditch Co 

Rocky Ford Canal Reservoir Land Loan and Trust Co 

Ross (Alexander) Reservoirs 

Ross (Geo. A.) Reservoir and Canal 

Ross (Myrtle ) Reservoir and Canal * 

Round Valley Water Storage Co 

Ruby Water Co. * 

Running Dutchman Ditch 

Runyan ( Levi N. ) Reservoir 

St. Johns Irrigation Co 

Sand Aroya Reservoir Inlet and Outlet Ditches * 

San Fernando Valley Water Co 

San Joaquin Electric Co 

Schreiner (Nicholas H.) Reservoir and Ditch 

Schwab (John L. ) Reservoirs and Ditches 

Schwartz (Byron L. ) Reservoir 

Scipio Irrigation Co „ 

Settlers' Milling Canal and Reservoir Co 

Seven Mile Flat Reservoir 

Sevier-Tintic Reservoir 

Shawnee Ditch 

Shropshire ( R. W. ) Reservoir 

Shumway ( Mahala) Reservoir and Ditches 

Sierra Irrigating Ditch Co 

Silva (John) Reservoir and Ditches 

Silver Lake Reservoir 

Silverman ( Julius) Reservoir 

Sink ( Dan S. ) Reservoir * 

Skousen (James N. ) Reservoir 

Slayton (John A. ) Ditch 

Slippy (Isaac N. ) Reservoir 

Small ( Jas. M. ) Reservoir 

Small (Geo. H . ) Reservoir 

Smith (Chas. W.) Reservoir* 

Smith (Frank M.) Canal 

Smith (Jas. A.) Reservoir and Ditch* 

Smith (John L.) and Dunham (Wm.) Reservoir... 

Smith ( W. L. ) Reservoir and Ditch * 

Snowflake and Taylor Irrigation Co 



California. 
Montana. 
New Mexico. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 
Oregon. 
Arizona. 

California. 
Wyoming. 
California. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Idaho. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Montana. 
California. 
Montana, 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
California. 
Montana. 
New Mexico. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Arizona. 

Do. 
New Mexico 
Arizona. 
Montana. 
California. 
Montana, 
Colorado. 
Wyoming. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
South Dakota. 

Do. 
Arizona. 
Montana. 
Wyoming. 
Montana. 
Arizona, 
Colorado. 
California. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Utah. 
Oklahoma. 
Utah. 

Do. 
Wyoming. 
Colorado. 
California. 
New Mexico. 
California. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
North Dakota. 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 
California. 
Oregon. 

Do. 
North Dakota. 
California. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 

Da 
Arizona. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 181 

Right of way granted for irrigation canals and reservoirs in certain states and Territories 
under act of March 3, JS91, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



Sorenson (Hans) Reservoir and Canal * 

Southern California Improvement Co 

Southern California Mountain Water Co 

South Platte Canal and Reservoir Co 

South Platte Land, lies' rvoir. and Irrigation Co 

Spaulding (.Ino. T. | Reservoirs 

Sprinkle (Robert L. ) Reservoirs 

Squires (John W.) Ditch a"d Reservoir 

Staff (Thos., Martha, and John) Reservoir and Ditch * 

State Line Reservi -ir * 

Sterner (Anthony and Philip) Reservoir* 

Stewart (R. D.) Reservoir and Ditch 

Stiehl ( Frank J. ) Reservoir * 

Stobie (J. B. ) Reservoir * 

Stocker (Luther C. ) Reservoir 

Stoltenberg ( Alice Clara) Reservoir and Canal 

Stott ( Elmer E. ) Ditch and Reservoir 

Summit Lake Irrigation Reservoir 

Surface Creek Ditch and Reservoir Co 

Swan Lake Reservoir and Canal Co 

Svveetman (L. D., R. H.,and A. M.) Reservoir* 

Sweetwater Irrigation Co. (successor to San Diego Land and Town Co.)* 

Swift Creek Reservoirs 

Swink ( G. W. | Reservoir and Canal 

Tarryall Reservoir and Ditch Co. (now Tarryall Reservoir) 

Tarrvall Reservoir (successor to Tarryall Reservoir and Ditch Co.) , 

Tayli ir ( P« iter ) Reservi ir .' 

Taylor (Win. F.) Reservoir 

Taylor (Win. IL ) Reservoir 

Tenney (Samuel R. ) Reservoir 

Tergeii (.John J.) Reservoir and Canals* 

Ternahan Reservoirs* 

Terrell (Jacob) Reservoir* 

Thibadeau i Elizabeth ) Reservoir 

Thibedeau (John | Reservoir 

Thuet ( < }eo. ) Reservoir * 

Thompson (R. L. ) Reservoir 

Thorington ( W. It. ) et al Reservoirs * 

Three Mile Reservoir 

Tinney ( Albert W. ) Reservoir 

Tomas ( Tims. ) Reservoir * 

Trail Creek Reservi >ir * 

Trail Gulch Reservoir 

Truscott (John L. ) et al Ditch * 

Turkey Creek Reservoir , 

Turner ( 'anal 

Twin Lake Reservoir , 

Twin Lakes Reservoir Co 

Udall (David IT.) Reservoir and Canal* 

Umatilla Irrigation Co. (act Feb. 10, 1891, 26 Stat. L., 745, and act Feb. 9, 1894, 28 Slat, 
L., 37, through Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oreg.). 

Union Land and Stock Co 

Union Water Co 

University ( 'anal Co 

l T te Mesa Reservoir and Irrigation Co 

Cte Park Improvement Co 

Vela (.las. ) Reservoir * 

Veseth (Ole) Reservoir and Ditch* 

Victor Reservoir Co., now Columbia Colonization Co 

Vigil Reservi >ir 

Vigil- Valdes Reservoir 

Wallace (William) Reservoir and Ditch 

Walter ( Louis W .) Reservoir 

Wasatch Water Co 

Water Suppl y and Storage Co 

West Side Ditch and Reservoir Co 

Whitbread ( Emily) Reservoir* 

Whitcomb (Chas. ) Reservoir 

White (Geo., Anne, David J., and Elbridge M.) Reservoir 

White Horse Reservoir 

White Mountain Reservoir and Canal 

White Mountain Reservoir Co 

Whitmoie (George C.) Pipe Line 

Whitmore (John A.) Reservoirs 

Whitney ( W. Grant) Reservoir 

Whitted (John) Reservoir 

Wild Horse Lake Reservoir and Ditch * 

Wild Horse Reservoir 

Wilhelmina Reservoir and Ditches 

Williams (C. J.) Reservoir and Ditch 

Williams ( Mary S. ) Reservoir and Ditch 



State or 
Territory. 

South Dakota. 
California. 

Do. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
California. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 
Sou tli Dakota. 
Colorado. 

Do. 
Montana. 
California. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
( Jolorado. 
Utah. 
Montana. 
i alifornia. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 
Arizona. 
Montana, 
Colorado. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 
North Dakota. 
Montana. 
California. 
Montana, 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Colorado 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Arizona. 

Do. 
Oregon. 

California. 

Do. 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 

Do. 

Do. 
Montana. 
California. 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 
Montana. 
Colorado. 
Utah. 
Colorado. 
Arizona. 
Montana. 

Do. 

Do. 
California. 
Utah. 

Do. 

Do. 
Montana. 
Idaho. 
Montana. 

Do, 
California. 
Montana. 

Do. 
California, 



182 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Might of way granted for irrigation canals and reservoirs in certain States and Territories 
under act of March 3, 1891, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



State or 
Territory. 



Williams (Wm. H.) Reservoir Colorado. 

Williamson (William M. ) Diteh and Reservoir ] Montana. 

Willow Reservoir j Wyoming. 

Wils< >n (James) Reservoir , Montana. 

Wilson (John B.) and Thompson (John D.) Reservoirs Do. 

Wood (Charles C. ) Reservoir Colorado. 

Wood (Sam H. ) Reservoir * Montana. 

Wood ( William F. ) Reservoir Do. 

Woods (Hardy) Reservoir* Colorado. 

Woolverton and Lee Reservoir and Canals j Montana. 

Wright ( W. W. ) Reservoir and Ditch ! California. 

Wyoming Development Co i Wyoming. 

Yakima Irrigation and Improvement Co I Washington. 

Yuma Pumping Irrigation Co. (act of Jan. 20, 1893, 27 Stat. L., 420, through Yuma ; Arizona. 
Indian Reservation). 

Zombro (Colliver) Canal j California. 

Zwisler (C. E. ) Reservoir and Ditch I Do. 

Total number, 552. Number separate cases, 548. 

PERMISSION TO USE RIGHT OF WAY FOR TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE 
LINES, ELECTRICAL PLANTS, CANALS, RESERVOIRS, TRAMROADS, ETC. 

By the act of February 15, 1901 (31 Stat. L., 790), the Secretary of 
the Interior is authorized to permit the use of rights of way through 
the public lands, forest, and other reservations of the United States, 
and the Yosemite, Sequoia, and General Grant national parks, Cali- 
fornia, for telegraph and telephone lines, electrical and w r ater plants, 
and canals, reservoirs, etc., for the storage and conveyance of water 
for all beneficial uses. 

This act provides for eveiy purpose contemplated by the acts of 
January 21, 1895 (28 Stat. L., 635), May 14, 1896 (29 Stat. L., 120), 
and section 1 of the act of May 11, 1898 (30 Stat. L., 404), and for 
other purposes additional thereto, except for tramroads, the provisions 
relating to them contained in the said acts of 1895 and 1898 remaining 
unmodified and not being in any manner extended. 

Although the act of 1901 does not expressly repeal any of these 
acts, yet, considering that this act covers the general scope and pur- 
pose of all the others, it is held to be proper, for administrative 
reasons, that the later act should control as to the granting of per- 
mission for the use of rights of way for the purposes specified in the 
act of 1901, under which it is therefore required that all such applica- 
tions shall be made. Applications for permission to use right of w^j 
for tramroads will continue to be governed bv the provisions of the 
aforesaid acts of 1895 and 1898. 

Under the acts of 1896 and 1901, aforesaid, providing for permission 
to use rights of way for electrical purposes, applications have been 
approved to 33 companies, individuals, and associations of individuals. 

There were received during the year 56 maps, which, with those 
pending July 1, 1903, made a total of 84 maps requiring action. Of 
these 33 were approved and 20 otherwise disposed of, most of the 
latter by returning for correction, leaving 31 awaiting action June 30, 
1904. 

Under the provisions of the tramroad act of 1895, as amended by the 
act of 1898, applications for permission to use right of wa} 7 have been 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 183 

approved to 12 companies, individuals, and associations of individuals, 
2 of which received their first approval during the past year. There 
was received during the 3 r ear, under these acts, 1 map, which, with 
those already pending, made a total of 3 maps on hand for action dur- 
ing the year; of these 2 were approved as aforesaid and 1 returned for 
correction (since which time it has not been refiled), thus clearing the 
docket of maps of this character. 

Instructions for the preparation of applications under the act of 
February 15, 1901, including also instructions for the preparation of 
applications for permission to use right of way for tramroads, will be 
found in the circular of July 8, 1901. 

RESERVOIRS FOR THE PURPOSES OF STOCK BREEDING AND TRANS- 
PORTATION. 

By the act of January 13, 1897 (29 Stat. L., 181), the construction 
of reservoirs upon unoccupied public lands, not mineral or otherwise 
reserved, is permitted upon certain conditions. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year there were pending 1,073 reser- 
voir declaratory statements under said act, and during the year there 
were received 858 new applications, making a total of 1,931 applica- 
tions susceptible of being acted upon during the year. Of these 2,159 
were acted upon as follows: Canceled or relinquished, 1,986; held for 
rejection or amendment, 119; approved, 51. The foregoing number 
having been acted upon there remained pending unacted upon on 
June 30, 1901, 2,172 applications, to which may be added the number 
(119) acted upon, but not finally disposed of, making a total of 2,891 
applications pending at the close of the year. 

During the past year the final proofs required by the law have been 
made in 51 cases, and have been approved b} T the Secretary of the 
Interior. The lands involved are now reserved "so long as such 
reservoir is kept in repair and water kept therein," and the applicants 
are required b}~ the regulations to submit annual proof of compliance 
with the law in this respect. 

Instructions for the preparation and filing of reservoir declaratory 
statements and the tiling of proofs of construction and maintenance 
under the act will be found in the circular of June 20, 1902. 

STATE DESERT-LAND SEGREGATIONS. 

By section 1 of the act of August 18, 1891 (28 Stat. L.. 372-122), 
provision is made for the donation to each of the States in which there 
may be situated desert lands of not more than 1,000,000 acres of such 
land as the State may cause to be irrigated, reclaimed, occupied, and 
cultivated by actual settlers. This act has been amended bv a provi- 
sion in the act of June 11, 1896 (29 Stat. L., 113-131), to the effect 
that a lien is authorized to be created by the State upon the lands seg- 
regated, and that when an ample supply of water is actually furnished 
to any tract or tracts thereof patent shall issue to the State for the 
same without regard to settlement or cultivation. A further amend- 
ment was made by section 3, act of March 3, 1901 (31 Stat. L., 1133- 
1188), by which it is provided that the time for the reclamation of the 
lands in each list shall be ten years from the date of its approval. If 



184 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

the lands shall not be irrigated and reclaimed in that time the Secre- 
tary of the Interior may continue the segregation of the lands for a 
period not exceeding five years, or he may restore such lands to the 
public domain. 

Lists have been filed by the States during the year as follows: State 
of Colorado. 1, aggregating 1,381.27 acres; State of Idaho, 2, aggre- 
gating 111.130.77 acres (one list of which, embracing 92,796.74 acres, 
is before this office on appeal from decision of local office rejecting the 
same); State of Oregon, 5, aggregating 17,783.60 acres; State of Wyo- 
ming, 5, aggregating 86,019.63 acres (one list of which, embracing 
26,936.03 acres, is before this office on appeal from decision of local 
office rejecting the same). 

Lists have been approved during the year as follows: State of Idaho, 

2, aggregating 24,241.22 acres; State of Montana, 1, aggregating 
3,675.22 acres; State of Oregon, 2, aggregating 28,284.83 acres; State 
of Wyoming, 5, aggregating 88,144 acres. 

Patents have been issued under said act during the year as follows: 
State of Montana, 1, aggregating 10,104.03 acres; State of Wyoming, 

3, aggregating 18,413.03 acres. 

Instructions for the preparation of lists, etc., under this act will be 
found in the circular approved January 15, 1902, which also contains 
instructions for the submission of proof of reclamation with a view to 
the issuance of patents for the lands. 

Statement of segregations applied for under the act of August 18, 1894 (28 Stat. L., 172- 
422) and the acts amendatory thereof, villi the action taken thereon, from the passage of 
the act to ./"I;/ 7, 1!>04 {areas in acres). 

Applications filed and temporarily segregated: 

Colorado 39, 247. 06 

Idaho 361 , 350. 35 

Montana 100, 002. 78 

Nevada 12, 644. 61 

Oregon 275, 757. 90 

Utah 236, 457. 50 

Washington 102, 501. 34 

Wyoming 516, 594. 79 

Total 1, 644, 556. 33 

Approved and patented: 

Wyoming 29, 734. 03 

Montana 10, 104. 03 

Total 39, 838. 06 

Approved, not patented: 

Idaho 337, 866. 17 

Montana 87, 426. 19 

Oregon 121, 786. 04 

Wyoming 397, 974. 18 

Less amount restored 6, 816. 38 

391,157.80 

Total 938, 236. 20 

Relinquished, rejected and otherwise disposed of: 

Colorado, acted on 39, 247. 06 

Idaho— 

Relinquished 18, 938. 69 

Rejected 4, 745. 49 

23,484.18 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 185 

Relinquished, rejected and otherwise disposed of — Continued. 
Montana- 
Relinquished 160. 00 

Rejected 2, 312. 56 

2, 472. 56 

Nevada, acted on 12, 644. 61 

Oregon — 

Relinquished 26, 076. 00 

Acted on 122, 149. 75 

148, 225. 75 

Utah- 

Relinquished 221, 143. 71 

Rejected 15, 313. 79 

236, 457. 50 

Washington — 

Relinquished 2, 346. 23 

Rejected 319. 94 

Acted on 99, 835. 17 

102,501.34 

Wyoming- 
Relinquished 8, 626. 85 

Rejected 29, 516. 21 

Acted on 18, 479. 34 

56,622.40 

Total 621, 655. 40 

Waiting action June 30, 1904: 

Oregon 5, 746. 11 

Wyoming 39, 080. 56 

Total 44, 826. 67 

Grand total 1, 644, 556. 33 

Idaho list No. 8, covering 92,796.74 acres and Wyoming list No. 27, 
covering 26,936.03 acres are pending on appeal from decisions of the 
local officers rejecting them. 



186 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



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194 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Patented to corporations, by States and Territories, up to June SO, 1904. 



State or Territory. 



Arizona . 
Arkansas 



California . 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Colorado .. 

Do 

Do 

Kansas 

Do 

Iowa 

Idaho 

Do 

Louisiana . 
Minnesota . 
Missouri . . . 



Montana 

Nevada 

New Mexico.. 
North Dakota 
Nebraska 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Oregon 

Do 

Do 

Utah 

Do 

Washington . . 

Do 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Total to corporations. 



Name. 



Atlantic and Pacific 

Atlantic and Pacific, successor to St. Louis and San Fran- 
cisco. 

Central Pacific 

Central Pacific, successor to Western Pacific 

Central Pacific, successor to California and Oregon 

Southern Pacific (main line) 

Southern Pacific (branch line) 

Union Pacific 

Union Pacific, successor to Denver Pacific 

Union Pacific, successor to Kansas Pacific 

...do 



Central Branch Union Pacific 

Sioux City and Pacific (now Missouri Valley Land Co.)... 

Northern Pacific 

Central Pacific 

New Orleans Pacific 

Northern Pacific 

Atlantic and Pacific, successor to St. Louis and San Fran- 
cisco. 

Northern Pacific 

Central Pacific 

Atlantic and Pacific 

Northern Pacific 

Sioux City and Pacific 

Burlington and Missouri River 

Union Pacific 

Central Branch Union Pacific 

Northern Pacific 

Oregon and California 

Oregon Central 

Union Pacific 

Central Pacific 

Northern Pacific 

Oregon Central 

Northern Pacific 

Union Pacific 



Acres. 



1,621,202.56 
23, 249. 94 



456, 

3,123, 

2, 923, 

686, 

595, 

806, 

2, 337, 

3, 837, 

220, 

4, 

684, 

9, 

1,000, 

1,817, 



7, 102, 

3, 357, 

409, 

9, 796, 

38, 

2, 374, 

4, 844, 

2, 

290, 

2, 728, 

126, 

801, 

1, 206, 

8, 196, 

1, 

9, 

5, 636, 



267. 53 

547. 50 
402. 26 
354. 80 
097. 87 
713. 08 
591. 90 

545. 01 
103.90 

520. 47 

383. 11 

349. 51 
545. 59 
817. 70 

836. 54 

039. 12 

959. 82 
919. 44 
819. 69 
448. 43 
227.84 
090. 77 
833. 06 
560. 03 
793. 93 

153. 48 
908. 02 

163. 02 
514. 21 
914. 63 
710. 11 
067. 55 

180. 55 



68, 426, 832. 97 



Total to corporations 68, 426, 832. 97 

Total to States 39, 738, 652. 14 



Total railroad grants 108, 165, 485. 11 

Total wagon-road grants 2, 616, 796. 37 



Total wagon-road and railroad grants patented up to June 30, 1904 110, 782, 281. 48 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 195 



G.— DIVISION OF PREEMPTION, DESERT LAND, TIMBER 
CULTURE, TOWN SITE, PRIVATE LAND CLAIMS, 
SCHOOL LANDS, AND INDIAN ALLOTMENTS. 

The following" is a summary of the work done in this division during 
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904: 

Letters on hand at beginning of fiscal year 2, 550 

Letters received during the iiscal year 24, 698 

Total on hand and received 27, 248 

Letters answered 7, 249 

Letters referred to other divisions 1, 643 

Letters otherwise disposed of 15, 947 

Total number disposed of 24, 839 

Letters pending July 1, 1904 2, 409 

Letters and decisions written 11, 116 

Caveats and cancellation cards prepared 7, 146 

Pages press copied 16, 838 

Fees for certified copies $204. 05 

Applications for amendments acted upon 219 

Appeals from registers and receivers decided (not contests) 341 

Appeals transmitted to Secretary 257 

Motions for review forwarded to Secretary 24 

Motions for review of office decisions acted upon 10 

Applications for certiorari forwarded to Secretary 4 

Secretary's decisions promulgated 142 

Pages of copying compared 9, 491 

Entries examined and approved for patenting: 

Preemption and Osage trust and diminished reserve entries 522 

Desert land 683 

Timber culture 1, 090 

Commuted timber culture 4 

Town site 40 

Town lot 6 

Total 2, 345 

Private land, donations, and small holding claims approved for patenting. 86 

Indian allotments approved for patenting 3, 013 

Applications for scrip (act June 2, 1858), approved 10 

Area involved in said scrip acres. . 1, 582. 32 

Applications for scrip rejected 4 

Assignments of scrip examined 118 

Original desert-land entries examined . ,. 7, 689 

Yearly proofs examined 10, 816 

Assignments of desert-land entries examined 764 

Desert-land entries canceled 1, 617 

Timber-culture entries canceled 2, 429 

Contests decided 134 

Contests closed 106 

Contests remanded to registers and receivers , 47 

Area of selections of various State grants approved acres. . 487, 064. 51 



196 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



ENTRIES, CLAIMS, AND CONTESTS PENDING. 

At the close of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904, the following- 
cases were pending in this division: 

Preemption entries 70 

Final desert-land entries 2, 565 

Final timber-culture entries 427 

Commuted timber-culture entries 78 

Town-site entries 

Town-lot entries 108 

Private land claims 2, 978 

Applications for scrip 

Small holding claims 

Scrip locations 18 

Indian allotments 1, 271 

Applications to amend 135 

Appeals from registers and receivers 10 

Appeals from Commissioner' s decision 51 

Contests pending 37 

There were also pending the following State selections, the area of 
each class being given: 

Acres. 

School indemnity 1, 177, 338. 08 

University 160, 768. 66 

Agricultural colleges 18, 329. 67 

Penitentiaries 6, 339. 42 

Public buildings 17, 486. 23 

Insane asylums 14, 000. 60 

Deaf and dumb asylums 3, 158. 55 

Reform schools 9, 209. 81 

School of mines 12, 407. 08 

Scientific schools 42, 189. 80 

Industrial schools 720. 00 

Blind asylums 1,695.63 

Soldiers'* Home 120.15 

Tuskegee Industrial School 200. 60 

Militarv institute 40. 00 

Reservoirs 167, 010. 25 

Industrial school for girls 45. 91 

Miners' hospital 14, 907. 21 

Educational, charitable, penal, and reformatory 21, 589. 73 

Normal schools 17, 445. 08 

Total 1,685,002.46 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 197 



H.— CONTEST DIVISION. 

The work of this division for the year ended June 30, 1904, has been 
of the same general character of the year before, viz, the examination 
and decision of contests in homestead, timber-culture, desert-land, and 
timber and stone entries. 

The cases that are examined in this division as the result of contests 
initiated in the various local offices are classified as follows: 

First. Cases on appeal from decisions of the local officers on the 
merits thereof, called docket cases. 

Second. Cases on appeal from the rejection of application to contest, 
applications to make entry, and other ex parte proceedings, called mis- 
cellaneous appeals. 

Third. Cases in which there is no appeal from the decision of the 
local officers, but which must be reviewed by this Office in order to deter- 
mine whether the decisions are rendered in accordance with existing 
laws and regulations, called unappealed cases. 

Fourth. Applications to be permitted to contest an entry of record 
or for hearings before the local officers, where the same have been 
denied or the local officers have no power under the rules and regula- 
tions to grant the same. 

Fifth. Motions for rehearing and review. 

During the last year there has been not only a large increase of land 
contests over any previous year, but the amount of work performed far 
surpasses that of any previous year, considering the number of clerks 
employed. 

As shown by the tabulated statement following there were 1,128 
appealed cases received from local offices, an increase of 204 over the 
previous year. 

There were 1,234 appeal cases decided, as against 408 the preceding 
year, a difference of 826. 

There were 4,786 unappealed cases examined and closed during the 
last year, as against 4,004 the preceding year, a difference of nearly 800. 

Over 3,000 more letters were written in the division during the past 
year than the previous year. 

Of appeals to the Secretary, nearly 200 more have been transmitted 
during the past year than the previous year. 

' More than three months has been gained on regular docket cases 
and more than one month on unappealed cases. 

APPEALED (DOCKET) CASES. 

Undecided appealed cases on hand July 1, 1903 965 

Received during the year from registers and receivers 1, 128 

2,093 

Referrred to other divisions during the year 6 

Decided during the vear 1, 234 

1, 240 

Balance undecided docket cases on hand 853 

Decided appealed cases awaiting closing on hand July 1, 1903 165 

Appealed cases decided during the year 1 , 234 

Appealed cases returned from the Department during the year 450 

1,849 



198 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Appealed cases transmitted to the Secretary on appeal during the year. 568 

Appealed cases closed during the year i 703 

1, 271 

Balance decided appealed cases on hand 578 

Total number of appealed cases on hand 1, 431 

UNAPPEALED CASES. 

Unappealed cases on hand July 1, 1903 1, 930 

Unappealed cases received during the year 4, 278 

6,208 

Referred to other divisions during the year 4 

Examined and closed during the year 4, 786 

4,790 

Balance unappealed cases on hand 1, 418 

Unappealed cases on hand examined but not closed „ 156 

Total undecided appealed and unappealed cases on hand 2, 271 

Of the ''unappealed cases on hand" there were examined and remanded 
during the year 385 

ENTRIES. 

Entries canceled during the year: 

Original 4, 488 

Final 102 

Entries approved for patent during the year 13 

Original entries involved in pending contests 2, 013 

Final entries involved in pending contests 124 

MISCELLANEOUS APPEALS. 

Appeals from action of registers and receivers on interlocutory ques- 
tions: 

On hand July 1, 1903 15 

Received during the year 229 

244 

Examined and decided during the year 235 

Referred to other divisions during the year 5 

240 

Balance on hand 4 

APPEALS. 

Appeals from the decisions of the Commissioner: 

On hand July 1, 1903 9 

Received during the year 696 

705 

Transmitted to Secretary during the year 568 

Disposed of during the year by dismissal and by declining to for- 
ward to Secretary 36 

604 

Balance on hand 101 

MOTIONS FOR REVIEW, REHEARING, AND CERTIORARI. 

Received during the year 210 

Acted on during the year 47 

Transmitted to the Secretary during the year 138 

185 

Balance on hand 25 



REPOKT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 199 

APPLICATIONS TO CONTEST. 

Applications to contest final entries received during the year 241 

Contests allowed and hearings ordered during the year 160 

Hearings denied during the year 70 

Referred to other divisions 1 

231 



Balance on hand 10 

DECISIONS RECEIVED FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

On hand July 1, 1903 62 

Received from the Department during the vear 601 

663 

Promulgated 639 



On hand 24 

LETTERS. 

Letters from all sources, including letters transmitting contests: 

On hand July 1, 1903 3,798 

Received during the year 13, 846 

17, 644 

Answered during the year 8, 27.0 

Filed with letters or cases previously received 5, 551 

Referred to other divisions during the year 291 

14,112 

Balance on hand 3, 532 

Number of letters written during the year 13, 834 



200 RKPOET OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



K.— DIVISION OF SWAMP LANDS. 

The division of swamp lands has charge of all claims reported under 
the swamp-land grants and prepares the lists of swamp lands in place 
and of swamp-land indemnity for approval, and writes the decisions 
rejecting improper claims and adjusting contests against and entries 
and locations in conflict with the swamp-land claims of the States to 
which the swamp-land grants have been extended. 

The correspondence of the office relative to all matters pertaining 
to the swamp-land business, such as reports to the Secretary of the 
Interior for the information of his office or for transmission to Con- 
gress or to the President and statements of the status of lands to 
individuals, is also prepared in this division. 

The following is a summary of the most important work performed 
in the division during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904: 



Letters and reports: 

Pending for action July 1, 1 903 282 

Received during the year 2, 145 

Answered and acted upon 1, 256 

Filed or referred 904 



2,427 
2,160 



Pending for action June 30, 1904 267 



Other letters written 994 



Swamp land in place claims (acres) : 

Pending July 1, 1903 (estimated) 1, 168, 022. 90 

Received during the vear 259, 691. 27 

1, 427, 714. 17 

Patented 259, 207. 23 

Rejected 126, 965. 80 

Canceled 1,830.00 

388, 003. 03 



Pending for action June 30, 1904 ( estimated ) 1, 039, 711.14 



Lists transmitted to Secretary for approval, 49 in number, embra- 
cing 379, 655. 10 

Lists approved by Secretary, 51 in number, embracing 391, 191. 42 

Decisions holding for rejection, 36 in number, embracing 180, 753. 00 

Decisions holding for cancellation, 7 in number, embracing 600. 00 



Swamp land, cash and land indemnity claims (acres): 

Pending July 1, 1903 (estimated) 2, 046, 056. 85 

Keceived during the year 

2, 046, 056. 85 

Cash indemnity approved ($1,926.20) on basis of .. . 1, 540. 96 

Land indemnity certified 200. 00 

Kejected 121, 080. 00 

Canceled 

122, 820. 96 



Pending for action June 30, 1904 (estimated) 1, 923, 235. 89 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 201 

Swamp land, cash and land indemnity claims (acres) — Continued: 
Lists transmitted to Secretary for approval, 5 in number, embra- 
cing 440. 00 

Decisions holding for rejection, 3 in number, embracing 1, 960. 00 

Decisions holding for cancellation, — in number, embracing 

Land indemnity patented , 



Contests against swamp-land claims: 

Pending July 1, 1903 96 

Received during the year 79 



175 
Decided 90 



Pending for action June 30, 1904 85 



Entries and locations in conflict with swamp-land claims: 

Pending July 1, 1903 * 98 

Received during the year 59 



Relieved from conflict by rejection of States' claims . 116 

Canceled . 32 



157 
148 



Pending for action June 30, 1904 



Miscellaneous: 

Examination made of plats and field notes of surveys to determine 

character of tracts 

Swamp-land approved lists certified (in duplicate), 54 in number, 

acres 396, 869. 72 

S wamp-land patents executed 54 

Swamp-land indemnity patents executed 

Patent records written _ pages. . 103 

Letters and reports prepared on typewriter do 5, 080 

Copies of letters, reports, and decisions do 1, 120 

Certified copies of documents made for w T hich fees were charged. . 47 

Legal fees charged for certified copies of documents |109. 80 

Railroad lists certified to, 70 in number, embracing 428, 362. 41 

SWAMP LANDS IN PLACE. 

Three special agents were employed in the State of Florida, examin- 
ing" the State's swamp land in place and indemnity claims, during- the 
past year, and the whole of the State's pending- claims was examined. 
Some of the reports of the several agents were received too late to 
enable this office to fully adjudicate the claim examined in the field 
within the fiscal year, and only a small portion can therefore appear 
in this report. The adjustments are being made as rapidly as the rules 
of practice permit, and that portion not included in the tables below 
will be reported in the next year's statement of work performed. 

New claims were reported during the year to the amount of 259,691.27 
acres; the approvals amounted to 391,191.42 acres; and the patents 
issued to the amount of 259,207.23 acres. 

The following three tables show in detail the result of work per- 
formed in the adjustment of swamp land in place claims favorable to 
the States. From the selection lists are prepared clear lists for 
approval, and on the basis of the approved lists are prepared patents, 
which are evidence of the final disposition of the lands to the States. 



202 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Lands selected by the several swamp-land States under the acts of Congress approved March 
2, 1849 (9 Stat L., 352); September 28, 1850 (9 Stat. L., 519, sec. 2479, Rev. Stat.), 
and March 12, 1860 (12 Stat. L., 3, sec. 2490, Rev. Stat.), from the dates of said acts 
up to June 30, 1904- 





1903. 


1904. 


Year end- 
ing June 
30, 1904. 


Total since 


State. 


Third 
quarter. 


Fourth First 
quarter. | quarter. 


Second 
quarter. 


dates of 
grants. 




Acres. 


Acres. Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 

534, 190. 04 
8, 656, 372. 39 
2,004,661.67 














278. 98 
1, 456. 49 




640. 00 
807. 81 




918.98 
3,870.73 


Florida 




1, 606. 43 


22, 293, 965. 64 


Illinois 




3, 981, 784. 10 












1, 377, 727. 70 






1 






4, 571, 851. 28 












11, 216, 831. 33 


Louisiana (act of 1850) 




110, 773. 82 






110, 773. 82 


774, 003. 65 










7, 293, 278. 93 




50, 064. 56 


82,524,53 11,538.65 




144,127.74 


5, 331, 488. 83 

3, 604, 795. 93 

4, 843, 676. 09 

117, 992. 00 
















Ohio 










Oregon 










526, 903. 63 


Wisconsin 










4, 569, 712. 12 














Total 


51, 800. 03 


193,298.35 ! 12. 986. 46 


1,606.43 259.691.27 


81, 699, 235. 33 






' 




' 



Swamp lands approved to the several States under the acts of Congress approved March 2, 
1849 (9 Stat. L., 352), September 28, 1850 (9 Stat. L., 519; sec. U80, Rev x Stat.) , and 
March 12, 1860 (12 Stat. L., 3; sec. 2490, Rer. Stat.), from the dates of said acts up 
to June 30, 1904. 





1903. 


1904. 


Year end- 
ing June 
30. 1904. 


Total since 


State. 


Third 
quarter. 


Fourth 
quarter. 


First 
quarter. 


Second 
quarter. 


dates of 
grants. 




Aa-es. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


^4cres. 


Acres. 
418, 157. 74 








120. 00 

12,995.71 

2, 454. 77 




120. 00 

29, 339. 68 

139, 481. 95 


7, 695, 477. 26 


California 


10, 534. 80 
19, 799. 91 


5, 169. 17 
2, 407. 19 


640. 00 
114, 820. 08 


2, 017, 691. 83 


Florida 


20, 433, 326. 65 


Illinois 


1,496,692.05 


Indiana 












1,265,955.75 




393. 70 








393. 70 


940, 511. 51 










8, 781, 518. 44 














414, 156. 97 














5, 730, 984. 28 




38,271.39 


57, 423. 75 


f»t;.438.42 


62,975.46 


215,109.02 


4, 254, 811. 98 




3, 337, 079. 17 


Missouri 












4, 498, 248. 26 


Ohio 












26,271.95 




5,615.78 






1, 131. 29 


6, 747. 07 


351,743.16 








3, 352, 787. 86 














Total 


74, 615. 58 


65, 000. 11 


72, 008. 90 


179, 566. 83 


391, 191. 42 


65, 015, 414. 86 







EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 203 



Swamp lands which have been certified or patented to the several States under the acts of 
Congress approved March 2, 1849 {9 Stat. L., 852), September 28, 1850 (9 Stat. L., 519; 
sec. 2480, Rev. Stat), and March 12, 1860 (12 Stat. L., 3; sec. 2490 Rev. Stat.), from 
the dates of said acts up to June 30, 1904- 





1903. 


1904. 


Year end- 
ing June 
30, 1904. 


Total pat- 
ented since 
dates of 
grants. 


State. 


Third 
quarter. 


Fourth 
quarter. 


First 
quarter. 


Second 
quarter. 




Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 
417, 352. 12 






74.22 






74.22 
24, 840. 88 
33,183.10 


7, 684, 935. 88 

1,924,026.30 

20, 006, 704. 53 

1, 457, 044. 68 




5, 200. 92 
23,447.51 


12, 226. 08 


7,413.88 
3, 620. 99 




6, 114. 60 


Illinois 
















1,254,110.73 






40.00 


353. 70 




393. 70 


870, 189. 09 








8,733,038.57 














394, 237. 45 










30.95 
46, 340. 64 


30.95 
194,172.42 


5, 654, 868. 76 
4, 099, 874. 17 
3, 278, 664. 99 




45,916.26 


31, 888. 29 


70, 027. 23 








23.38 






23.38 


3, 344, 702. 90 
26, 251 . 95 
249,244.82 


Ohio 












5,456.83 




174. 12 


857. 63 


6,488.58 




3, 250, 662. 34 
















Total 


80,021.52 


38, 140. 49 


82, 781. 13 


58,264.09 


259,207.23 


62, 645, 909. 28 





It will be seen from the above that new swamp land in place claims 
were filed during the year to the amount of 259,691.27 acres, as against 
232,115.71 filed the previous year, being an increase of 27,575.56 acres; 
that ordinary claims were approved to the amount of 391,191.42 acres, 
as against 48,261.10 acres approved the previous year, being an increase 
of 342,930.32 acres; and that lands were patented to the amount of 
259,207.23 acres, as against 47,467. 88 acres patented the previous }^ear, 
being an increase of 211,739.35 acres. These statements and compari- 
sons ignore the approval and the patenting of the Everglades and 
Mangrove Swamp in Florida reported last year, and which of them- 
selves covered nearly 3,000,000 acres. 

The adjudications of claims by rejections during the year amounted 
to 128,795.80 acres, as against 165,591 acres rejected and canceled 
in the previous year, a decrease of 36,795.20 acres. This does not 
include rejections of indemnity claims, which are separately reported 
below. 

The amount of swamp land in place claims remaining unadjudicated 
can not be stated with precision, but it is estimated to have been about 
1,039,711 acres at the close of the fiscal year, which is the amount car- 
ried in the report for the month ended June 30, 1904. 

The claims of the various States remaining unadjudicated are com- 
posed chiefly of numerous remnants of large claims which have been 
settled in the past, the said remnants having been omitted from the 
original settlements of the lists in which they are embraced by reason 
of imperfect descriptions, conflicts with other claims, etc. The final 
adjustment of these claims involves much research in the records and 
files of this office and requires long recitations of facts in the decisions 
acting upon them, in the event of their being adjusted against the 
claimant, which is very frequently the case. The exact amount rejected 
and canceled during the past fifty-four years that the adjustment of 
swamp-land claims has been in progress can not be reported, as no 
account of rejections and cancellations has been kept in a tabulated 



204 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

form in the annual or other reports, except during the past thirteen 
years. The following- table shows in detail the acreage of the claims 
rejected and canceled during the last fiscal year, and also during the 
previous twelve years: 

Statement showing rejection of claims and cancellations of selections under the sivamp-land 
laws during the period from July 1, 1892, to June 30, 1903, and also during the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1904- 





1892-1903. 


1904. 




State. 


Swamp 

land in 

place. 


Swamp- 
land in- 
demnity. 


Total. 


Swamp 
land in 
place. 


Swamp- 
land in- 
demnity. 


Total. 


Recapitu- 
lation. 




Acres. 

45, 600. 00 
1, 166, 012. 16 

54, 640. 00 

1, 033, 740. 50 

739, 973. 16 

45, 481. 93 

892, 826. 20 

1,207,014.65 

65, 160. 00 
596, 707. 11 
144, 339. 50 
348, 637. 68 

22, 480. 00 
151,071.41 
266, 512. 54 

72, 804. 29 


Acres. 
14, 340. 00 


Acres. 

59, 940. 00 

1, 166, 012. 16 

54, 640. 00 

1,041,600.50 

1, 567, 786. 56 

46, 161. 93 

1,351,721.76 

1, 220, 655. 02 

65, 160. 00 

596, 707. 11 

193,579.50 

506, 972. 95 

63, 122. 79 

151,071.41 

266, 512. 54 

72, 804. 29 


Acres. 
1, 040. 00 


Acres. 


Acres. 
1,040.00 


Acres. 
60, 980. 00 


Arkansas 




1, 166, 012. 16 


California 










54, 640. 00 


Florida 

Illinois 

Indiana ...:... 


7, 860. 00 

827, 813. 40 

680. 00 

458, 895. 56 

13, 640. 37 


80,610.00 
720. 00 


10, 920. 00 
6, 680. 00 


91,530.00 
7,400.00 


1,133,130.50 

1,575,186.56 

46, 161. 93 




6, 760. 00 

3, 360. 00 

80.00 

17, 505. 80 
1,000.00 

10, 000. 00 


84, 360. 00 
1, 120. 00 


91,120.00 

4,480.00 

80.00 

17,505.80 
1,000.00 

28, 000. 00 


1,442,841.76 

1,225,135.02 

65, 240. 00 


Louisiana 

Michigan 


Minnesota 






614, 212. 91 
194, 579. 50 


Mississippi 


49, 240. 00 

158, 335. 27 

40, 642. 711 




Missouri 

Ohio 


18, 000. 00 


534, 972. 95 
63, 122. 79 


Oregon 


1,080.00 
6, 640. 00 




1 , 080. 00 
6, 640. 00 


152, 151. 41 








273, 152. 54 
72, 804. 29 


Unclassified . . . 


















Total.... 


6, 853, 001. 13 


1,571,447.39 


8, 424, 448. 52 


128, 795. 80 


121, 080. 00 


249, 875. 80 


8, 674, 324. 32 



Note.— The rejections and cancellations represented in the above table represent illegal, duplicate, 
and improper claims which have been encumbering the records for many years. Formal decisions, 
with notice to the State authorities of the right of appeal under the rules 6f* practice, have been ren- 
dered on the whole of the claims rejected and canceled. 

SWAMP-LAND INDEMNITY. 



During the year three special agents of this office were employed in 
investigating the swamp-land indemnity claims in the States of Florida, 
Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri. 

The reports of the special agents in the field indicate that a large 
proportion of the claims examined are without merit, and in mairy 
cases the special agents have obtained admissions from the owners of 
the claims showing that deceptive and fraudulent practices have here- 
tofore been resorted to by their agents in submitting testimony as to 
the character of the lands claimed as the basis of indemnity, especially 
on claims filed in this office by contractors to prosecute claims in the 
names of the States and their grantees, a quarter of a century or more 
after the regular claims were reported by the United States surveyors- 
general. 

Three cash indemnity accounts, amounting to $1,926.20, on the basis 
of 1,540.96 acres, were paid, and three land indemnity lists, amount- 
ing to 200 acres, were certified, and 105 decisions rejecting claims to 
the amount of 121,080 acres were promulgated during the year. 

The following table exhibits in detail the final adjustments under 
the swamp-land indemnity statute and the decisions thereunder, viz: 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 205 



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indemnity 

paid. 










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Aug. 18,1903 
Aug. 22,1903 
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206 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 207 

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208 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

The following table exhibits the total amount of cash paid and of 
lands certified and patented since the passage of the act of March 2, 
1855; also the amount of unadjusted claims pending at the close of the 
fiscal year: 

Table showing the cash indemnity paid and the land certified under the swamp-land 
indemnity acts; also the indemnity lands patented and the cash and land indemnity 
claims remaining unadjusted up to June 30, 1904- 



State. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

Florida (acts of 1855 and 1857). 
Florida (Palatka indemnity) . 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Louisiana 

Michigan 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Ohio 

Wisconsin 



Total 



Cash indemnity paid. 



$18,505.44 

374,450.00 
67, 045. 63 



470, 970. 81 
39,080.14 

584, 284. 53 
53, 118. 65 
L5,922.06 
17,786.56 

193, 870. 15 
29, 027. 76 

L85.278.9] 



2, 049, 340. 64 



Basis. 



Acres. 

33,308.04 

209, 160. 00 

78, 705. 08 



445, 979. 18 
29, 973. 63 

468,521.7] 
49, 588. 98 
13, 364. 31 
21,910.05 

189, 343. 80 
23,441.67 

154,348.09 



1,717,644.54 



Land indemnity awarded. 



Certified. Patented. 



Acres. 

20, 009. 36 



88,172.76 

7, L51.59 
101.984.90 

8, 434. 84 
341.632.97 

32, 546. 83 
24,639.43 
47, 888. 73 
83,126.74 



Acres. 
19, 795. 16 



106, 042. OS 



80, 959. 09 

4, 464. 18 

2,309.07 

4, 880. 20 

321,845.23 

31, 727. 64 

24,038.69 

17,846.88 

80, 936. 69 

"i65,"647.'99" 



861,630.23 



723, 850. 82 



Cash and 
land indem- 
nity claims 
remaining 
unadjusted. 



Acres. 

18, 960. 00 



3, 080. 00 



1,023,000.00 
47, 840. 00 
854, 400. 00 
39, 240. 00 
3, 760. 00 
148,480.00 
33, 960. 00 
20, 800. 00 
11,240.00 



2,204,760.00 



Secretary's Decisions Relative to the Adjustment of Swamp-Land Claims 

during the Fiscal Year. 

state of iowa. 

Indemnity (act of March 2, 1855). — Swamp-land indemnity locations under the act 
of March 2, 1855, can only be made upon "public lands subject to entry at one dollar 
and a quarter per acre, or less. ' ' 

Lands within the primary limits of the grant of May 12, 1864, in aid of the con- 
struction of the McGregor and Missouri River Railroad, which were erroneously 
included within the meander lines of a lake, are not for that reason excepted from 
the provisions of said act increasing in price the alternate sections along the line of 
road therein provided for. (32 L. D., 197; July 16, 1903.) 

STATE OF LOUISIANA. 

Field notes of survey. — The duty of identifying the lands passing to the State of 
Louisiana under the swamp grants of March 2, 1849, and September 28, 1850, 
devolves upon the Secretary of the Interior for the time being, and it is within the 
power of that officer to resort to such plan of identification as seems to him best cal- 
culated to secure a proper adjustment of said grants. 

The history of procedure by the land department in the adjustment of these grants 
reviewed and specific instructions given for a speedy final adjustment thereof. 
(32 L. D., 270; October 1, 1903.) 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. 



Reservation for school purposes. — Swamp and overflowed lands lying within sec- 
tions 16 and 36 in the four townships in the White Earth Indian Reservation, 
in the State of Minnesota, ceded to the United States under the act of January 14, 
1889, did not pass to the State under its grant of swamp lands made by the act of 
March 12, 1860, said sections being on that date in reservation for school purposes 
by virtue of the acts of March 3, 1849, and February 26, 1857. (32 L. D., 325; 
December 3, 1903. ) 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 209 

Indian reservation (act of March 12, 1860). — Lands, swamp and overflowed, and 
rendered thereby unfit for cultivation, not reserved or granted by the United States 
on March 12, 1860, the date of the act granting swamp lands to the State of Minne- 
sota, passed to the State under said grant, and are therefore excepted from the 
provisions of the act of January 14, 1889, relating to the disposition of the ceded 
Chippewa lands. (32 L. D., 328; December 3, 1903.) 

Field notes of survey. — The rule adopted by the land department, that all contests 
or controversies thereafter begun respecting the swampy or nonswampy character 
of lands in Minnesota must be determined by the field notes of survey, does not 
inhibit an examination in the field as to the swampy or nonswampy character of 
lands shown by the field notes to be swamp and overflowed for the purpose of deter- 
mining the truth of allegations that the field notes are false and fraudulent or grossly 
incorrect. (32 L. D., 497; March 12, 1904.) 

Adjustment (field notes of survey) . — Re} ort to the President of the United States 
relative to departmental decisions of March 16, 1903, prescribing certain rules gov- 
erning the adjustment of the grant of swamp and overflowed lands made to the 
State of Minnesota by the act of March 12, 1860. (32 L. D., 531; March 19, 1904. ) 

STATE OF OREGON. 

Request for issue of patent (act of September 28, 1850). — Where a State has accepted 
the grant of swamp and overflowed lands made by the act of September 28, 1850, 
has disposed of and conveyed all its interest in certain of the lands claimed there- 
under, and requests for the issuance of patent therefor, as provided by said act, have 
been made by different governors of the State, such patent may issue to the grantees 
of the State without further request on the part of the present governor. (32 L. D., 
265; September 25, 1903. ) 

8970—04 14 



210 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



L.— DRAFTING DIVISION. 

All of the drafting required by the General Land Office for depart- 
mental and other purposes is done by this division. In addition to 
the preparation of maps and diagrams for official use, which embraces 
about 60 per cent of the entire work performed, and for which no 
charge can be made, the division also prepares numerous copies of 
official plats and diagrams which are charged for at cost and in con- 
formity to the laws and regulations in force authorizing this work. 
The most important official work embraces the compilation of maps of 
the United States and of the numerous States and Territories in which 
public land is located, the platting of maps pertaining to townships 
and lesser subdivisions, and diagrams and copies of plats and tracings 
which are of official record. A necessary and very important work 
required of the division includes examinations of locations of rights of 
way for railroads, canals, ditches, and reservoirs, to determine their 
relative locations with reference to the lines of public survey, and to 
discover conflicts of location which may arise between them. 

This division is also custodian of all official field notes of surveys of 
the public domain, and the originals and photolithographic copies of 
maps and plats relating thereto, together with about 393 volumes of 
mineral plats, and several thousand segregation mineral plats and 
diagrams. 

The following is a statement in detail of the correspondence work 
performed in this division during the fiscal year 190-1, viz: 

Letters received during the year 2, 655 

Letters disposed of: 

By answer 2, 200 

By tiling ( no answer required) 356 

Bv reference to other divisions and bureaus 93 

Pending, June 30, 1904 6 

Total number of letters answered as above 2, 200 

Letters originating in Division L 271 

Total number of letters written 2,471 

The completion and delivery of the 1902 United States map was pre- 
vented, after the receipt of only 200 copies, by the Baltimore fire, and 
on March 1, 1904, the lithographers were advised of their release from 
further liability under the contract. By act of Congress approved 
March 28, 1904, the unexpended balance under this contract was made 
available for the 1904 edition. Steps were immediately taken to hasten 
the completion of the 1903 edition, and about 3,000 copies of this map 
have been received up to June 30, 1904. 

The work of bringing the copperplate base of the United States 
map up to date for the 1904 edition is being pushed as rapidly as may 
be. Contract for lithographing 63,000 copies of the 1904 map, more 
or less, has been entered into with a Philadelphia firm, which has 
expressed its readiness to take up the work promptly, as soon as 
transfers are delivered to it, which will be in a few weeks. The con- 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 211 

tract for printing this edition provides that within five weeks after 
order is received to print, the first 10,000 copies are to be delivered; 
that four weeks shall be allowed for the delivery of the second and 
each succeeding- 10,000 copies, and that the entire edition is to be com- 
pleted within twenty-five weeks after the work of printing is begun. 

The compilation .of a map of Washington is well in hand; maps of 
Wyoming and Minnesota have been revised and partly recompiled and 
are ready for final tracing, while a new map of Michigan is now ready 
for the lithographers as soon as contract is entered into for the new 
fiscal year. New editions of Nevada, New Mexico, and Arizona have 
been received since June 30, 1903. 

In the compilation of maps of States and of the United States, it is 
often necessary to send clerks and draftsmen to other bureaus and 
other departments for data not obtainable in this division, especially 
for data covering names and location of new towns and post-offices, 
counties and county boundaries, etc., much time being consumed in 
securing this desirable information. The accumulation of this mate- 
rial, however, expedites the compilation of any map when the recoid 
of changes of the character named is kept up to date and ready for 
immediate use. 

During the year a base map of the United States 44 by 67 inches in 
size was compiled and drawn upon a polvconic projection, scale 50 miles 
to an inch, showing drainage, State boundaries, etc. Photolitho- 
graphic copies of this map were reproduced upon live copies of which 
were shown, by designations in color and proper lettering, the several 
outboundaries of the Territory of Louisiana which occurred at the time 
of the transfers of the same from one State to another between the 
date of La Salle's proclamation, in 1682, and the purchase from France 
by the United States in 1803. These maps were made for use in con- 
nection with the exhibit of this office at the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition. 

A General Land Office map of 1903 was also prepared for enlarged 
reproduction by photolithographic process in 20 sheets. The same 
was mounted and all color work added thereto in the Government 
building at the exposition by one of the draftsmen of this division 
detailed for that purpose. The size of this map when mounted was 
12 by 16 feet. 

About 20 charts were prepared in connection with the Louisiana 
Purchase Exhibit, showing data of different kinds relating to the survey, 
sale, and patenting of Government lands. 

Three maps, to accompany the annual reports of the governors of 
Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma Territories, were edited and cor- 
rected. In connection with work pertaining to the creation of forest 
reserves, a large number of permanent and temporary withdrawals 
have been examined and diagrams made, often in duplicate, for future 
use in this office. Drafts of all proclamations creating forest reserves 
have been carefully examined in this division, before submitting to 
the Secretary of the Interior, in regard to the description of bounda- 
ries, and the areas were computed in each instance. 

A number of letters have been written and surveys examined for 
the surveying, mineral, and swamp-land divisions. 

Several draftsmen have been employed at various times during the 
year upon the preparation of plats and field notes for binding; and as 



212 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

a result 82 volumes of field notes, 109 volumes of miscellaneous plats, 
and 1 atlas have been prepared and sent to the Government Print- 
ing Office. 

There were made 1,277 drawing paper and other diagrams for the 
various local offices and bureaus connected with the Department; 126 
diagrams, for which fees were collected to the amount of $111.21; 275 
tracings of maps, plats, and diagrams for official use, and 102 tracings, 
for which fees were collected to the amount of i>l,099.25. 

This division*supplied 1,912 photolithographs of plats of survey for 
official use in the various bureaus; 903 to surveyors-general and reg- 
isters and receivers, and to outside applicants 7,762, for which fees 
were collected to the amount of $2,011.18. A large number of these 
copies required comparison and certification. As against the above 
number of photolithographs disposed of, the 296 plats remaining with 
the contractors on June 30, 1903, have been returned to this office, 
together with editions; also 718 of 769 originals sent during the pres- 
ent fiscal year, making a total of 1,011 editions, or 15,210 photolith- 
ographs. 

Two hundred and eleven plats sent the contractors during the fiscal 
year were returned without photolithographic editions, and in a more 
or less damaged condition, on account of the Baltimore fire, 51 being 
under the special North Dakota contract and 157 under the contract 
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1903. The North Dakota appro- 
priation was allowed to lapse, with the consent of the Department, as 
the contract was practically completed, while $2,150 of the regular 
appropriation for 1903 has been extended by act of Congress so as to 
be available for the coming fiscal year. This is in addition to the 
regular appropriation for photolithographs. 

Examination and report have been made upon 272 railroad and 
tramway maps and 116 maps of canals, ditches, and reservoir sites, 
nearly all in duplicate. Three hundred and seventy-four copies of 
approval on similar maps have been made, together with designation 
of land districts. Seven hundred and ten subdi visional township plats, 
89 township exteriors, and 31 miscellaneous surveys have been entered 
upon working diagrams and filed for reference. Frequent demands 
are made upon this division for calculations and tabular statements of 
areas of States and Territories, reservations, etc. For example, it was 
necessary to recompute the area of the different nations in Indian Ter- 
ritory, necessitating the checking of all the township plats relating 
thereto. Annual corrections are also made of the Division C tables, 
due to changes in land districts and county boundaries. 

A plat index of Oklahoma and an index of Idaho field notes have 
been compiled for the drafting division; 9 index diagrams have been 
revised for Division E and 5 indexes of tract books for Division C. 
Among other diagrams requiring special compilation may be mentioned: 
Three, showing respectively the allotments, etc., in the Red Lake, 
Devils Lake, and Rosebud Indian Reservations; 2 diagrams of national 
parks; 1 plat for the Secretary of Agriculture, showing reservoirs, etc. ; 
3 diagrams of exteriors and 1 of Alabama subdivisions; 2 indexes of 
subdi visional plat books; 3 railroad diagrams showing limits in New 
Mexico and Arizona; 10 plats of the Hooper Valley Indian Reserva- 
tion; 1 complete set of forest reserves in scrapbook for Division N, 
and 180 Gilsonite mining claims in Utah. Three hundred letters from 



REPOTCT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 213 

surveyors-general and 391 segregation plants of mineral surveys have 
been noted on cards and filed. A number of computations of frac- 
tional lots created by mineral claims have been required. 

The table of areas of the States and Territories of the United States, 
compiled by this division and published for the first time in the annual 
report of the Commissioner of the General Land Office for 1899, is 
again presented. The areas with reference to the States and Terri- 
tories remain as heretofore given, with the exception of Indian Terri- 
tory and Oklahoma. 

Table of areas of the States and Territories of the United States. 



State or Territory. 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Indian Territory 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

Sonth Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Land surface. 



Square 
miles. 



97 



Acres. 



(>2s 
162 
738 
412 
203 
669 
7'.) I 
969 
59 
M)I 
850 
271 
(Mil 

860 

Mil 

697 

M.s 

S'.IS 

899 
894 
875 

DoS 
515.) 
997 

;;s;; 

210 

777 

901 

056 

454 

545 

687 

'.172 

172 

72:; 

623 

746 

679 

081 

460 i 

885 j 

686 ' 

506 | 

096 

111 

925 

792 

343 

117 

;>:>2 



Total 3, 547, 746 2, 270, 557, 440 



32, 657, 920 

368, 103, 680 

72, 792, 320 

33, 543, 680 

99, 969, 920 

66, 348, 160 

3, 068, 160 

1,260,160 

37, 760 

35, 072, 640 

37, 664, 000 

53, 293, 440 

35, 842, 560 

22, 950, 400 

19, 714, 560 

35, 646, 080 
52, 382, 720 
25, 534, 720 
29, 055, 360 
19, 132, 160 

6, 320, 000 
5, 144, 320 

36, 819, 200 
51,198,080 
29,685,120 
43, 795, 840 
93, 593, 600 
49,137,280 
70, 336, 640 

5, 795, 840 
4, 770, 560 
78, 428, 800 
30,519,680 
31,342,080 
44, 910, 080 
26, 062, 720 
24, 718, 720 
61, 277, 440 
28, 594, 560 
691, 840 
19,494,400 
49, 206, 400 
26,679,040 
168, 003, 840 
52,541,440 
5, 832, 960 
25,552,000 
42, 746, 880 
15, 579, 520 
35, 274, 880 
62,433,280 



Water surface. 



Stpiare . 

miles. 



728 

24, 284 

132 

816 

2, 030 

300 

818 

411 

10 

4,183 

586 

557 

2,350 

727 

437 

573 

388 

434 

4, 227 

3,145 

2, 422 

508 

40, 460 

6,338 

536 

706 

821 

754 

778 

321 

719 

142 

6,032 

3,702 

707 

3,741 

248 

1,092 

1,249 

166 

588 

695 

370 

3, 505 

2, 832 

449 

2,405 

3,782 

161 

10, 688 

326 



144, 379 



465, 920 

15,541,760 

84, 480 

522, 240 
1,299,200 

192, 000 

523, 520 
263, 040 

6,400 

2, 677, 120 

375, 040 

356, 480 

1,504,000 

465, 280 

279, 680 

366, 720 

248, 320 

277, 760 

2, 705, 280 

2,012,800 

1, 550, 080 

325, 120 

25, 894, 400 

4,056,320 

343, 040 

451,840 

525, 440 

482, 560 

497, 920 

205,440 

460, 160 

90, 880 

3,860,480 

2, 369, 280 

452, 480 

2,394,240 

158, 720 

698, 880 

799, 360 

106,240 

376, 320 

444, 800 

236, 800 

2, 243, 200 

1,812,480 

287, 360 

1,539,200 

2, 420, 480 

103,040 

6, 840, 320 

208,640 



92, 402, 560 



Total areas. 



Square 
miles. 



51,756 

599,446 

113,870 

53, 228 

158, 233 

103, 969 

5, 612 

2,380 

69 

58, 984 

59, 436 

83, 828 

a 58, 354 

b 36, 587 

31,241 

56, 270 

82, 236 

40, 332 

49, 626 

33, 039 

12, 297 

8, 546 

c 97, 990 

d 85, 335 

46, 919 

69, 137 

147, 061 

77, 531 

110, 679 

9,377 

8,173 

122, 687 

e 53, 719 

52,674 

70, 879 

/ 44, 464 

38, 871 

96, 838 

Sr45,928 

1,247 

31,048 

77, 580 

42, 056 

266, 011 

84,928 

9,563 

42. 330 

70, 574 

24, 504 

h 65, 805 

97, 878 



, 692. 125 



Acres. 



33, 123, 840 

383, 645, 440 

72, 876, 800 

34, 065, 920 

101, 269, 120 

66, 540, 180 

3,591,680 

1. 523, 200 

44,160 

37, 749, 760 

38, 039, 040 

53,649,920 

37, 346, 560 

23,415,680 

19, 994, 240 

36, 112, 800 

52,631,040 

25, 812, 480 

31, 760, 640 

21,144,960 

7, 870, 080 

5, 469, 440 

62, 713, 600 

55,254,400 

30, 028, 160 

44, 247, 680 

94,119,040 

49, 619, 840 

70, 834, 560 

6,001,280 

5, 230, 720 

78, 519, 680 

34,380,160 

33,711,360 

45, 362, 560 

28,456,960 

24, 877. 440 

61,976.320 

29, 393, 920 

798, 080 

19, 870, 720 

49,651,200 

26, 915, 840 

170, 247, 040 

54, 353, 920 

6,120,320 

27,091,200 

45,167,360 

15, 682, 560 

42, 115, 200 

62, 641, '.120 



2, 3(52, 960, 000 



« 1,674 square miles of Lake Michigan included. 
b 230 square miles of Lake Michigan included. 

c 16,653 square miles of Lake Superior, 12,292 square miles of Lake Michigan, 9,925 square miles of 
Lake Huron, and 460 square miles of Lakes Erie and St. Clair included. 
d 2,514 square miles of Lake Superior included. 
« 3,140 square miles of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie included. 
/ 3,443 square miles of Lake Erie included. 
a 891 square miles of Lake Erie included. 
)> 2,378 square miles of Lake Superior and 7,500 square miles of Lake Michigan included. 



214 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 
Table of areas of the States and Territories of the United States — Continued. 





Land surface. 


Water surface. 


Total areas. 


State or Territory. 


Square 
miles. 


Acres. 


Square 
miles. 


Acres. 


Square 
miles. 


Acres. 


NEW ACQUISITIONS (AP- 
PROXIMATED). 










143,000 

6,740 

3,600 

175 

73 


91, 520, 000 

4, 313, 600 

2, 304, 000 

112,000 

46, 720 


Hawaiian Islands 
























Tutuila Group of the Sa- 
















Total new acquisi- 








153, 588 


98, 296, 320 




















3, 845, 713 


2, 461, 256, 320 












The area of Lake Michigan is included in the table, and so much of 
the areas of Lakes Superior, Huron, St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario as is 
within the jurisdiction of the United States. 

For the States bordering the oceans the general shore line is taken 
as boundary, thus including the areas of bays, 



inlets, etc. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 215 



M. -DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS. 

The following- is a summary of the work performed in this division 
during- the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904: 

Letters received and considered 32, 514 

Letters written - 21, 1 65 

Accounts examined and forwarded for settlement 10, 820 

Duplicate certificates of deposit received and recorded 11, 800 

The accounts, covering $14,262,259.01, show receipts and disburse- 
ments as follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

578 quarterly accounts of receivers of public moneys (sales of pub- 
lic and Indian lands) " $9, 849, 032. 15 

428 quarterly accounts of receivers of public moneys (unearned 

fees and unofficial moneys) 717, 547. 39 

102 accounts of moneys collected on account of depredations on 

public timber 85, 663. 48 

61 accounts of moneys collected on account of sales of public tim- 
ber, acts March 3, 1891 , and June 4, 1897 50, 276. 12 

36 accounts of moneys received from sales of Government prop- 
erty ( old furniture, etc. ) 917. 85 

104 accounts of moneys received by town-site boards 30, 234. 44 

(72) accounts of moneys deposited by individuals to cover the cost 
of field and office work in connection with the survey of pub- 
lic lands * 196, 303. 41 

12 accounts of receiving clerk, General Land Office, for moneys 

received from certified copies and transcripts of records 23, 675. 00 

1, 321 Total receipts 10, 953, 649. 84 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

1, 161 quarterly accounts of receivers of public moneys as special dis- 
bursing agents $846, 772. 85 

(428) quarterly accounts of receivers of public moneys ( unearned fees 

and unofficial moneys ) " 703, 031. 72 

210 quarterly accounts of surveyors-general as disbursing agents. . 319, 588. 74 

25 State fund accounts 332, 016. 35 

1, 127 repayment accounts for land erroneously sold 99, 095. 60 

190 accounts of deputy surveyors 319, 244. 25 

56. accounts of town-site boards 26, 144. 22 

6, 730 miscellaneous accounts, including those of special agents, in- 
spectors, forest superintendents, supervisors, rangers, and 

contingent, transportation, and other accounts 662, 715. 47 

9, 499 Total disbursements 3, 308, 609. 20 

The aggregate receipts of the land service during the fiscal year 
ended June ,'30, 1904, were $9,288,341.98, and the aggregate expendi- 
tures and liabilities $2,100,093.92, leaving a net surplus in the United 
States Treasury of $7,183,248.06 on account of the disposals of public 
lands during said fiscal year. 

The larger part of the above expenditures are, as heretofore, dis- 
connected from the business of disposals of public lands, and therefore 
can not be properly considered as offsets or charges against receipts 



216 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

from such sales. In this class may be specified the following expend- 
itures and liabilities for the year: 

Expenses connected with surveying the public domain, State bound- 
aries,' etc $625, 161. 00 

Expenses of protecting forest reserves 357, 099. 00 

Expenses of protecting public lands 201, 000. 00 

Expenses of inspecting mines in Territories 6, 855. 00 

Expenses of publishing maps for public use 19, 160. 00 

Total 1, 209, 275. 00 

As has been noted in prior years, these and other similar expendi- 
tures in the land service pertain to the general functions of the Gov- 
ernment, as do expenditures in other bureaus which yield no income 
or receipts whatever. Omitting, then, the expenses thus above noted 
(11,209,275), there remains a net grand surplus of receipts over 
expenditures during the fiscal year of 1904, amounting to 18,392,523.06. 

A large amount of work has been performed by the division that 
can not be conveniently tabulated, such as the preparation of statistical 
tables, estimates of annual and other appropriations, reports called for 
by the Court of Claims and by Congress, receipt, examination, record- 
ing, and distribution of returns from local land offices, compilation of 
statistics for this annual report, and much other service in connection 
with the public lands. 

The following tables are submitted, showing a recapitulation of the 
public land transactions in the several States and Territories during the 
year: 

Amounts deposited by mining claimants on account of the platting of their claims and other 
office work in the surveyors-general 1 s offices during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 



District, 



Alaska . 
Arizona 



California ! 10, 260. 00 



$5, 900. 00 
15, 060. 00 



Colorado 

Idaho 

Montana 

Nevada 

New Mexico 



39, 560. 00 
9, 070. 00 

10, 995. 00 
3,005.00 
3, 375. 00 



District. 



Oregon 

South Dakota. 

Utah 

Washington . . 
Wyoming 



Amount. 



Total 



$4, 590. 00 
7, 770. 00 

15,795.00 
4, 070. 00 
6, 775. 00 

136, 225. 00 



Amounts deposited by settlers and railroad companies during the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1904, to secure the survey of public lands under the provisions of the acts of Congress 
approved August 20, 1894 {28 Stat. Ij., 423), and February 27, 1899 {30 Stat. L., 892). 



Depositor. 


Field work. 


Office work. 


Aggregate. 


Settlers 


$2, 580. 50 

100. 00 

25, 107. 00 

38, 802. 00 


$440. 00 

75. 00 

2, 900. 00 

4, 540. 00 


$3, 020. 50 


Central Pacific R. R. Co 


175. 00 
28, 007. 00 


Santa Fe Pacific R. R. Co 


43, 342. 00 






Total 


66. 589. 50 


7,955.00 


74, 544. 50 







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 217 



Amounts deposited by railroad companies during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904, to 
reimburse the United States for the cost of the survey {field and office work) of public lands 
selected by them and embraced within the limits of their grant*. 



Name of road. 


Field work. 


Office work. 


Aggregate. 




$57.21 

587. 09 

.69 

14, 329. 69 


$20. 00 
43.98 


$77. 21 


St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Rwy. Co 

Santa Fe Pacific R. R. Co . . 


631.07 
.69 




2, 499. 01 


16, 828. 70 






Total 


14, 974. 68 


2, 562. 99 


17, 537. 67 







In addition to the above amount, viz, $17,537.67, deposited by rail- 
road companies to reimburse the United States for the cost of surve} r s 
during the fiscal year 1901, certificates covering deposits made by rail- 
road companies under the act of February 27, 1899 (30 Stat. L., 892), 
were surrendered under the provisions of said act to the Commissioner 
of the General Land Office during said fiscal year on account of sur- 
veying fees due the United States, as follows: 

Central Pacific Railroad Company $15, 667. 00 

Northern Pacific Railway Company 52, 519. 00 

Oregon and California Railroad Company 1, 410. 00 

Sante Fe Pacific Railroad Company 5, 932. 36 

Southern Pacific Railroad Company 1, 485. 00 

Total 77, 013. 36 

making a total reimbursement to the United States of $91,551.03, 
during the fiscal year 1901 on account of survey of land within rail- 
road grants. 



Statement showing tin amounts covered into the Treasury to the credit of the reclamation 
fund from the sales of public lands and fees and commissions in the several States and 
Territories during tin: fiscal years 1901, 1902, and 1903, under the jtrovisions of the act 
of Congress approved Jam' 17, 1902 (32 Stat. L. 





Fiscal years. 


Total for 

three years 

ending June 

30, 1903. 


State or Territory. 


1901. 

$42, 586. 16 

205, 030. 40 
254, 889. 88 

206, 645. 36 
20, 188. 78 

367, 342. 31 

102, 963. 21 

9, 183. 47 

75, 203. 06 
449,474.96 
370,464.93 
364,988.62 
113, 274. 20 

98,416.00 
257, 180. 95 
206, 989. 59 


1902. 


1903. 


Arizona 


$39, 187. 35 

298, 240. 36 

' 374,105.13 

300, 803. 27 

28,946.94 
105, 035. 49 
132,234.94 

14, 230. 61 

72,034.60 
778,021.35 
63S, 330. 44 
515,972.44 
194,288.17 

48, 408. 38 
536, 907. 82 
178, 773. '24 


$48, 360. 20 
S39.221.40 
519,812.89 
650,331.95 
27,836.50 
55s, 071. 49 
138, 728. 70 
14,136.76 
154,265.49 

1.244,916.47 
864, 766. 83 

1,896,970.68 
248, 696. 14 
88, 872. 38 

1,109,299.54 
279. 709. 18 


$130, 133. 71 
1,342,492.16 


California 


Colorado 


1,178,807.90 


Idaho 


1,157,780.58 
76,972.22 


Kansas 


Montana 


1,330,449.29 


Nebraska 

Nevada 


373, 926. 88 
37, 550. 84 


New Mexico 


301, 503. 15 


North Dakota 


2,472,412.78 




1 873,5C»-' 20 


Oregon 


2,807,931.74 


South Dakota 


556,258.51 


Utah 


235, 696. 76 
1,903,388.31 


Washington 


Wyoming 


665, 472. 01 






Total.... 


3,144,821.91 


4,585,520.53 


8, 713, 996. 60 


16, 444, 339. 04 







218 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement showing the total amount accrued and paid to each of the States hereinafter- 
named and to the Territory of New Mexico on account of the grants of 2, 3, and 5 per 
cent of the net proceed* of the sales of public land lying within their respect ire limits, up 
to and including the fiscal year 1902, the amount for the fiscal year 1903, and the aggre- 
gate amounts to June 30, 1903, inclusive. 



State <»r Territory 



Alabama 
Arkansas , 
Colorado . 
Florida . . 

Idaho 

Illinois .., 
Indiana . . 
Iowa 



Kansas 

Louisiana 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Mexico.. 
North Dakota 
Ohio 



Oregon 

South Dakota. 

Utah 

Washington . . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Total to June 
30, 1902. 



Fiscal vear 
1903. 



Total 12, 268, 119. 86 



, 069, 877. 

275,365. 

323, 820. 

112, 551. 

58,568. 

. 187, 908. 

,040,255. 

633,638. 

,094,792. 

443, 732. 

573, 533. 

447,411. 

, 065, 308. 

.039,515. 

134,170. 

518,964. 

12,672. 

6, 742. 

81,283. 

999, 353. 

287,944. 

57, 679. 

16.719. 

157,671). 

579, 568. 

49,043. 



#450. 15 

5, 115. 15 

8, 322. 31 

437. 92 

30, 422. 57 



520. 47 

5, 758. 23 

2, 553. 95 

25, 103. 87 

432. 59 

1,445.17 

25, 000. 53 

5,110.90 

496. 69 

5, 133. 71 

49, 919. 20 



90, 135. 24 
9, 282. 95 
3, 516. 73 

50, 554. 22 
1,540.22 

10, 763. 58 



332, 016. 35 



Aggregate to 
June 30, 1903 
(inclusive). 



$1,070, 
280, 
332! 
112. 

88; 
1,187; 

1, 040 

633, 

1,095 

449 

576 

472 

1,065 

1,040 

159 

524 

13 

11 

131 

999 

378 

66 

20 

208 

581 

59 



327. 70 
480. 99 
, 142. 41 
989. 18 
,991.36 
, 908. 89 
, 255. 26 
, 638. 10 
,313.11 
,491.07 
, 087. 86 
, 515. 23 
, 740. 74 
, 990. 96 
,170.92 
,075.03 
,168.86 
, 875. 92 
, 202. 40 
, 353. 01 
, 079. 46 
, 962. 06 
, 236. 08 
, 224. 64 
, 108. 31 
, 806. 66 



12, 600, 136. 21 



The following- is a statement of the acreage disposed of during- the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1904: 

CASH SALES. 

Acres. 

Private entries ' 22, 308. 12 

Public auction 68, 603. 78 

Preemption entries 9, 675. 25 

Timber and stone entries 1, 306, 261. 30 

Mineral-land entries 88, 182. 55 

Desert-land entries ( original ) 753, 731 . 33 

Excesses on homestead and other entries 22, 009. 87 

Coal-land entries 28, 827. 42 

Town sites 138. 55 

Supplemental payments 1. 79 

Abandoned military reservations 2, 330. 79 

Under sundry special acts 5, 273. 98 



2, 307, 344. 73 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Homestead entries ( original ) 10, 171, 265. 97 

Entries with — 

Military bounty land warrants 32, 164. 44 

Agricultural college scrip 960. 00 

Private land scrip 7, 880. 00 

Red Lake and Pembina scrip 480. 00 

Valentine scrip 80. 00 

Sioux half-breed scrip 400. 00 

Dodge scrip 40. 00 

State selections 1 , 042, 398. 39 

Railroad selections 2, 353^ 584. 96 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 219 

Acres. 

"Wagon-road selections 77, 709. 10 

Indian allotments 4, 610. 19 

Small holdings 447. 93 

Donation act - 320. 00 

Swamp lands patented 259, 207. 23 

13,951,548.21 

Total area of public land entries and selections 16, 258, 892. 94 

INDIAN LANDS. 

Cherokee school 579. 62 

Southern Ute 11, 286. 27 

Ute 38, 426. 23 

Osage trust and diminished reserve 10, 998. 36 

Chippewa 120. 00 

Red Lake Indian Reservation ceded lands 73, 524. 27 

Otoe and Missouria 40. 00 

Omaha 360. 30 

Absentee Shawnee Indian school land 319. 50 

Umatilla 1 . 759. 68 

Sioux 41. 44 

Uintah and White River Ute lands 720. 38 

Colville Indian Reserve 8, 752. 96 

146, 929. 01 

Grand total 16, 405, 821. 95 

RECAPITULATION. 

Area sold for cash 2, 307, 344. 73 

Area, miscellaneous entries 13, 951, 548. 21 

Area, Indian lands 146, 929. 01 

16,405,821.95 

Showing a decrease of 6,418,477.70 acres as compared with the 
aggregate of disposals for the fiscal 3 7 ear 1903. 

The foregoing statement does not include the following entries, the 
areas of which have been previously reported in the original entries 
of the respective classes: 

Acres. 

Final desert-land entries 268, 913. 43 

Homesteads commuted to cash 2, 142, 185. 44 

Timber-culture entries commuted under act March 3, 1891 320. 00 

Abandoned military reservations 18, 804. 81 

Cash substitutions 2, 721. 49 

Supplemental payments 178. 14 

Under sundry acts 11 , 913. 32 

Final homesteads 3, 232, 716. 75 

Final timber-culture entries 70, 640. 05 

5, 748, 393. 43 
Commuted homestead and final desert entries, Indian lands 88, 860. 22 

Total '. 5, 837, 253. 65. 



220 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

The number of tilings and fees thereon will be found in the follow- 
ing table: 



Number. 



Fees. 



Preemption declaratory statements 

Homesteads, soldiers' declaratory statements 

Coal land, declaratory statements 

Reservoir, declaratory statements 

Valentine scrip applications 

Timber and stone applications 

Town site applications 

Mineral land applications 



Mineral ad. erse claims. 



Total 

Miscellaneous fees: 

For reducing testimony to writing, etc 
For cancellation fees 



Total. 



297 
1,097 
2, 985 
1,303 

3 
9, 582 

2 
1,773 



17, 042 
229 



17, 271 



$857. 00 
2, 307. 00 
8, 764. 00 
2, 091. 00 
3.00 
95, 820. 00 
6.00 
17, 730. 00 



128, 178. 00 
2,290.00 



130, 468. 00 



111,660.85 
4, 993. 00 



247, 121. 85 



CASH RECEIPTS. 



The following is a statement of the cash receipts of the office from 
various sources during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904: 

Sales of land at private entry $28, 293. 84 

Sales of land at public auction 103, 198. 20 

Sales of land by preemption entry 12, 480. 96 

Sales of timber and stone land , 3, 266, 142. 96 

Sales of mineral land 354, 064. 86 

Sales of desert land (original) 188, 405. 49 

For final desert land •. 268, 922. 12 

For commuted homesteads 2, 747, 659. 61 

For timber-culture entries commuted under act of March 3, 1891 400. 00 

For excesses on homestead, timber culture, and other entries 31, 172. 28 

For sales of coal lands 395, 209. 90 

For sales of town sites 323. 20 

For sales of town lots 120. 00 

Interest payments on commuted homesteads 8, 535. 71 

For competitive bids 329. 25 

For supplemental payments 34. 18 

Cash substitutions 3, 263. 03 

Sales of abandoned military reservations ,. 26, 726. 82 

Sales under sundry special acts 10, 620. 43 

Total 7, 445, 902. 84 

FEES AND COMMISSIONS. 



For homestead entries ( original and final) $1, 

For timber-culture entries ( final) 

For entries with — 

Military bounty land warrants 

Agricultural college scrip 

Valentine scrip ' 

Dodge scrip 

For State selections 

For railroad selections 

For wagon road selections 

For lands entered under donation act 

For commissions oh commuted homesteads (Indian 

ceded lands) 

For preemption, coal, reservoir, and other filings 

For mineral adverse claims 



050, 551. 16 


1, 820. 00 


805. 50 


24.00 


2.00 


1.00 


12, 322. 00 


29, 542. 00 


976. 00 


10.00 


6, 815. 38 


128, 178. 00 


2, 290. 00 



KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 221 



For cancellation notices 

For reducing testimony to writing, etc. 



$4, 993. 00 
111, 660. 85 



$1, 349, 990. 89 

Total receipts from disposal of public lands 8, 795, 893. 73 

Total receipts from disposal of Indian lands 333, 757. 62 

Total receipts from depredations on public lands 72, 585. 08 

Total receipts from sales of timber under acts March 3, 1891, and June 

4, 1897 56, 691. 70 

Total receipts from sales of Government property (office furniture, etc) . 738. 85 

Total receipts from furnishing copies of records and plats 23, 675. 00 

Grand total 9, 283, 341. 98 

The total cash receipts for the fiscal year 1903 were $11,024,748.65, 
showing* a decrease in receipts for the vear ended June 30, 1904, of 
$1,741,401.67. 

The total expenses of district land offices for salaries and commis- 
sions of registers and receivers, incidental expenses, and expenses of 
depositing public moneys during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904, 
were $842,975.51, an increase of $14,112.89. 

The aggregate expenditures and estimated liabilities of the public 
land service including expenses of district land offices, as stated, were 
$2,100,093.92, leaving a net surplus in the United States Treasury of 
$7,183,248.06. 

Statement by States and offices of the disposal of Indian lands during the fiscal year ended 

June SO, 1904. 



State and office. 


Entries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


CHEROKEE SCHOOL. 

Alabama: 


12 
94 


579. 62 
( [3, 735. 00] 


$724. 55 


SOUTHERN UTE. 

Colorado: 


1 1 1 . 601 . 53 




\ 11,286.27 J 


UTE. 

Colorado: 

Durango 


1 
132 

38 

227 


3.70 4.83 


Glenwood Springs 


f [3, 198. 61] 11 13451 _ 

\ 11,784.88 If w ' 401, ' t> 


Gunnison 




\ 4, 768. 38 
J [4,849.36] 
\ 21,869.27 


} 29,422.16 




Total 


398 


f [8,407.97] 
\ 38, 426. 23 


} 48,756.55 




SHOSHONE AND BANNOCK. 

Idaho: 


7 




70.00 








OSAGE TRUST AND DIMINISHED RESERVE. 

Kansas: 

Dodge City 


155 


10.918.36 


It, 712. 83 


Topeka 


2 1 80.00 


311.75 






Total 


57 10,998.36 


15, 024. 58 




KANSAS TRUST AND DIMINISHED RESERVE. 

Kansas: 

Topeka (from deferred and interest payments) 




45.93 








CHIPPEWA. 

Minnesota: 


27 f [2,884.77] 

Lt \ 120.00 

180 [26,486.95] 

17 [2,441.37] 


\ 3, 800. 96 
33,108.71 


Crookston 


Duluth 


3, 051 . 92 






Total 


„,,. f r.31.813. (191 


| 39,961.59 




224 


\ 120. 00 



222 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OB'FICE. 

Statement by States and offices of the disposal of Indian lands during the fiscal year ended 

June 30, 1904— Continued. 



State and office. 



RED LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION CEDED LANDS. 

Minnesota: 

Crookston (first payments) 



FLATHEAD. 

Montana: 

Missoula (from deferred and interest payments) 



Nebraska: 
Lincoln 



Nebraska: 
O'Neill 



OTOE AND MISSOURI A. 



Nebraska: 
O'Neill 



ABSENTEE SHAWNEE INDIAN LANDS. 



Oklahoma Territory: 

Oklahoma City" (2 sales public auction). 



Oregon : 

La Grande. 



South Dakota: 
Chamberlain 

Huron 

Pierre 

Rapid City .. 
Watertown . . 



Total 



UINTAH AND WHITE RIVER UTE LANDS. 

Utah: 

Salt Lake City 



Washington: 

Spokane Falls. 

Watervi,lle 



COLVILLE INDIAN RESERVE. 



Total. 



Entries. 



477 



36 



238 

7 

13 

1 

2 



261 



L19 



Acres. 



73, 524. 27 



-10. 00 



[3, 566. 77] 



360. 30 



Amount. 



$95, 681. 17 



2, 052. 95 



2, 022. 80 



17, 269. 66 



319. 50 10, 680. 00 



26,521. 



[33, 942. 79 

[960. 32 

[1,687.21] 

[157. 58^ 

41.44 



[36, 747. 90] 
At 44 



720. 38 



[2, 869. 49] 

8, 226. 10 

[1, 720. 00] 

526. 86 



28,546.68 
740. 24 
883. 61 
108. 20 
131.80 



j 30,410. 



53 



900. 48 



25, 481. 49 
3, 762. 86 



[4, 589. 49] 1 9q i>u o- 
8, 752. 96 J 29 ' IU - 6b 



RECAPITULATION. 





Entries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


Alabama 


12 

492 

7- 
157 

701 


579. 62 
f [12,142.97] 
\ 49,712.50 


$724. 55 


Colorado 


| 60, 358. 08 
70. 00 


Idaho 




10, 998. 36 
/ [31,813.09] 
\ 73,644.27 


15, 070. 51 

} 135,642.76 

2, 052. 95 




Montana 


Nebraska 


42 


J [3, 566. 77] 

\ 400. 30 

319. 50 

1, 759. 68 

f [36,747.90] 


} 22,081.81 
10, 680. 00 


Oklahoma (public sales) 


Oregon 


26 
261 


26,521.60 


South Dakota 


j 30,410.53 
900. 48 


Utah 


\ 41. 44 

8 720.38 
U9 f [4,589.49] 
Uy \ 8,752.96 


Washington .- 


} 29,244.35 




Total 


1,825 


f [88,860.22] 
\ 146, 929. 01 


} 333, 757. 62 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 223 



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224 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



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226 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement showing, by fiscal years, the amount of money received for public lands sold, and 
fees and commissions collected on public lands disposed of otherwise than for cash, from 
July 1, 1886, to June 30, 1904; also the aggregate receipts from sales and fees and com- 
missions during said period. 



Fiscal year. 


Total cash 

sales. 


Total amount 

fees and 
commissions. 


Total receipts 

from disposal 

of public 

lands. 


1887 


$9, 246, 321. 33 
11,203,071.95 
8, 018, 254. 50 

6. 349, 174. 24 
4, 160, 099. 07 
3,322,865.01 
3, 193, 280. 64 
1 , 653, 080. 71 
1, 116, 090. 07 
1,053,905.59 

917, 911. 19 
1,291,076.10 
1,703,988.32 
2, 899, 731. 83 
2, 966, 542. 86 
4, 139, 268. 47 
8,960,471.18 

7, 445, 902. 84 


$1,537,600.39 

1,498,000.05 

1,251,971.23 

1,121,696.07 

944, 938. 65 

1,064,805.26 

998, 184. 65 

1,021,205.08 

750, 710. 59 

793, 557. 82 

678,469.55 

853, 265. 50 

890, 702. 17 

1,157,081.03 

1,340,894.29 

1,740,820.18 

1,597,147.48 

1,349,990.89 


$10, 783, 921. 72 
12, 701, 072. 00 


1888 


1889 


9, 270, 225. 73 


1890 


7, 470, 870. 31 
5, 105, 037. 72 


1891 


1892 


4, 387, 670. 27 
4,191,465.29 
2, 674, 285. 79 
1,866,800.66 
1, 847, 463. 41 


1893 . 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897... 


1,596,380.74 
2, 144, 341. 60 
2, 594, 690. 49 


1898 


1899 


1900 


4, 056, 812. 86 
4, 307, 437. 15 
5, 880, 088. 65 
10, 557, 618. 66 
8, 795, 893. 73 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 





Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices during the fiscal year ended 

June 30, 1904. 

HUNTSVILLE, ALA. 

[Note. — The area in brackets is not included in the aggregate by States, having been accounted 

for in the original entries.] 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 


65 
22 


61.78 

[1,752.87] 






$77. 20 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 






2, 191. 11 












87 61 - 78 


'"$882." 96' 
995. 74 


"§2,575.66 


2, 268. 31 

3, 457. 96 

995. 74 




359 

372 


35, 818. 61 
[39, 826. 72] 






22.00 
801. 30 


22. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








801. 30 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


818 


35, 880. 39 


1, 878. 70 


3, 398. 30 


7, 545. 31 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










3, 761. 82 












1, 027. 68 
5.65 
























Total 










4, 795. 15 














12 


579. 62 






724. 55 











MONTGOMERY, ALA. 





2 

118 

1 

112 
2 


239. 26 

164. 32 
[80. 04] 

[11,924.93] 

T239. 371 






$598. 15 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






206. 36 








109. 05 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 






14,906.37 


Substitution of cash for military bounty 






299. 23 














235 
647 
377 


403. 58 
57, 195. 05 
[36, 644. 00] 






16, 119. 16 

5, 862. 80 
917. 19 




$1, 432. 80 
917. 19 


$4, 430. 00 


Final homestead entries 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 227 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
MONTGOMERY, ALA.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- j F 
sions. * ees - 


Amount. 


Lands entered with military bounty land 


14 
2 
1 


1,279.99 




$32.00 

20.00 

2.00 
42.00 

753. 62 


$32. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 




20. 00 


Soldiers and sailors' homestead declara- 






2.00 








42. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








753. 62 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,276 


58,878.62 


$2, 349. 99 


5,279.62 


23, 748. 77 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








4, 521. 96 








2, 295. 58 












Total 








6,817.54 








1 





JUNEAU, ALASKA. 





16 
8 
1 


1,129.61 

216. 90 

.05 






$5, 197. 50 
542. 26 


Sales of land under act May 14, 1898 (30 
Stats., 409) 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






.06 












25 

20 
20 
13 

8 


1, 346. 56 
424.09 
[424. 09] 






5, 739. 82 




$16.56 
16.61 


$100. 00 


116. 56 




16.61 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 


130. 00 
80.00 

21. 25 


130. 00 






80.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






21. 25 












Total of all classes of entries and 


86 


1, 770. 65 


33.17 


331. 25 


6, 104. 24 






Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










3, 379. 23 












815. 51 














Total 










4, 194. 74 















PRESCOTT, ARIZ. 



Sales of mineral lands 


56 
1 

[2] 

3 

2 

3 


3,849.33 
78. 55 

[225.89] 

24. 14 
[319. 04] 

[357. 35] 






$17,362.50 








98. 20 


Sales of abandoned military reservations, 


175. 68 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations.. 






46.43 


Final entries under the desert land act 






319. 04 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






646. 70 












65 


3. 952 09, 






18, 648. 55 
1,109.05 




70 j 9,752.91 

53 [7,990.92] 

977 156.217.54 


$474. 05 
423. 16 


$635. 00 




423. 16 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 


1,964.00 


1, 954. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 


71 
5 
2 






710.00 

50.00 

6.00 

1.00 

235. 31 


710. 00 


Mineral protests, adverse claims 






50.00 


Reservoir declaratory statements 






6.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






1.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 









235. 31 











Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,243 


169, 922. 47 


897. 21 


3,591.31 


23, 137. 07 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










5,226.44 


Incidental expenses 








786. 32 












Total 










6, 012. 76 















228 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the busidess transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

TUCSON, ARIZ. 



Class of entry. 


M um- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




71 
3 

43 
32 
12 

56 


6, 325. 58 
[236. 87] 

122. 77 
5,074.27 






$26, 930. 00 
596. 08 


Sales of abandoned military reservations . . 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 




153. 46 


Original entries under the desert land act. 




1,268.56 


[1, 952. 63] 
[8, 462. 67] 




1, 952. 63 
10, 628. 34 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 











217 

382 

77 
1 
2 

85 

15 

1 

1 
2 


11,522.62 

52, 279. 97 

[10,101.23] 

40.00 

320. 00 




41,529.07 




$1,954.50 ffi3.425.00 


5, 379. 50 
365. 44 




365. 44 




Lands entered with Valentine scrip 


1.00 

4.00 

850. 00 

150. 00 

3.00 

3.00 
2.00 


1.00 




4.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




850. 00 






150. 00 








3.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






3.00 


Filing fees on Valentine scrip location 






2.00 






24. 00 24. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1,044.42 | 1,044.42 








Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


783 


64,162.59 2,319.94 


5,506.42 ! 49,355.43 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








6, 000. 00 










1 584 62 










105. 75 












Total 








7,690.37 












CAMDEN, ARK. 





95 
5 

96 

93 


9, 463. 47 
360. 35 

553. 18 

[10, 919. 17] 






$23, 658. 66 
450. 44 


Sales of land under act Aug. 31, 1852 

Excess payments on homestead, timber 











691. 39 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301. R. S 






13, 648. 95 








Total cash sales 


289 

'1,179 

552 

109 

6 
86 

4 
2 

94 


10, 377. 00 
126, 794. 20 
[67, 334. 13] 

12,638.48 

960. 00 

4, 067. 30 

489. 01 


i 


38, 449. 44 
12, 264. 88 




$3, 169. 88 
1, 683. 32 


$9, 095. 00 




1,683.32 


Lands entered with military bounty laud 
warrants 


316. 00 
24. 00 


316. 00 


Lands entered with agricultural college 
scrip 




24. 00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 

Lands selected under grants to railroads... 






8.00 
4.00 

940. 00 
21.00 

1, 308. 15 


8.00 






4.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




940. 00 






21.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






1, 308. 15 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2, 321 


155,325.99 | 4,853.20 


11,716.15 


55, 018. 79 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








6, 000. 00 










2, 232. 24 
3.05 




















Total 








8, 235. 29 















KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 229 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

DARDANELLE, ARK. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




. 17 
182 
39 


2, 007. 16 
1,093.76 

[4,835.74] 






$5, 017. 90 


Excess payments on homestead, timber 






1, 368. 86 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 






6, 044. 70 












238 
707 
151 

2 
5 

17 

1 
1 


3, 100. 92 
87, 087. 28 
[16, 549. 68] 

240. 00 
200.00 






12,431.46 




$2, 229. 51 
435. 12 


$5, 885. 00 


8,114.51 




435. 12 


Lands entered with military bounty land 


6.00 


6.00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 








170. 00 

2.00 
2.00 

8.00 

441. 98 


170.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






2.00 








2.00 








8.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








441. 98 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


i 
1,122 90,628.20 


2,664.63 6,514.98 


21,611.07 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








4, 543. 30 










188.00 










7.45 












Total 










4, 738. 75 















HARRISON, ARK. 



Sales of land at public auction 


1 

8 
124 

93 

44 


40.00 

359. 96 

14, 402. 78 

254. 36 

[4, 796. 74] 






ftoO. 00 






900. 00 








36 140 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber 
culture, and other entries and locations.. 






317.91 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S . . . 






5,996 32 












270 

1, 668 

536 

1 

4 

86 

8 
1 

4 


15,057.10 
188, 024. 94 
[66, 995. 16] 

40. 00 
160. 00 






43, 404. 23 
17 835 81 




$4, 700. 81 
1,674.84 


ft 13, 135. 00 




1 674 84 


Lands entered with military bounty land 


1.00 


1.00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 

Applications to purchase mineral lands 








860. 00 

80.00 
10.00 

8.00 
39.00 

906. 97 


860. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 






80.00 








10.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






8.00 








39.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








906. 97 










Total of all classes of entries «and 
amount received therefrom 


2,578 


203,282.04 6,375.65 


15, 039. 97 


64, 819. 85 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 










• 


2, 729. 36 
1.95 


Expense of depositing public monevs 




1 














Total 








8,731.31 











230 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

LITTLE ROCK, ARK. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- y 
sions. r eu -' 


Amount. 




12 

1 

28 

1 

24 


876.46 
40.00 

136. 65 

[160. 00] 

[2, 312. 60] 




$2, 191. 15 
100 00 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 




170. 84 


Cash substitution for military bounty land 






200 00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 






2, 890. 76 












66 
643 
334 

1 

1 
3 

1 

12 


1, 053. 11 
66, 038. 01 
[35, 868. 25] 

120. 00 
40.00 
402. 96 






5, 552. 75 

6,411.68 

922. 78 




$1,686.68 .725.00 




922. 78 




Lands entered with military bounty land 


3.00 


3.00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 










6.00 
10.00 

120. 00 
17.00 

936. 26 


6.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 




10.00 






120. 00 











17.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 




936. 26 








Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,061 67,654.08 


2,609.46 | 5,817.26 


13,979.47 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 




4, 812. 74 
1,222.40 










Total 


! 1 ! 


6, 035. 14 










EUREKA, CAL. 





22 

482 
1 

13 

17 


1,679.84 

74, 159. 04 

10.31 

40.87 

[2, 515. 37] 






$2, 100. 30 
185, 397. 78 














27.50 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






51.12 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 






3, 144. 22 











535 

158 

50 

S 

1 

58 

1 

1 


75, 890. 06 
22,331.55 
[6, 933. 50] 

156. 61 

[43. 34] 

8,201.17 

38.79 


I 


190, 720. 92 




$837. 52 
260. 00 

5.88 

1.62 


$1, 445. 00 


2, 282. 52 




260. 00 


Original homestead entries, Klamath 


15.00 


20.88 


Final homestead entries, Klamath Indian 


1.62 






116. 00 


116. 00 








Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 





10.00 
4, 820. 00 


10.00 


482 




4. 820. 00 








14.00 1 14.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






1,688.70 ; 1,688.70 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


• 
1,289 106,618.18 


1,105.02 


j 
8,108.70 199,934.64 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 


j 






6, 000. 00 










3, 223. 33 












Total 








9, 223. 33 










REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 231 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land office, etc. — Continued. 

INDEPENDENCE, CAL. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




1 158.15 
7 229. 31 

1 I .13 
17 4,080.73 
10 ! [1,341.43] 

2 [320.00] 






• $395.38 








1,160.00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






.16 


Original entries under the desert-land act . 






1,020.18 






1, 341. 43 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 






400. 00 












38 i 4,468.32 






.4,317.15 




28 • 4,182.83 


ffiifls. in ffi27n.no 


438. 40 




11 [1 630.37] 5K IS 




58.15 




72 10,567.60 
2 320. nn 




144. 00 


144. 00 








Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 


9 

1 
3 






90.00 

10.00 
30.00 
3.00 
3.00 

371. 90 


90.00 




10.00 






30.00 




1 
1 




3.00 






3.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 




371.90 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


166 


19,538.75 1 226.55 


921. 90 


5, 465. 60 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 






1,976.78 






259. 66 


Total 












2, 236. 44 


1 


i 





LOS ANGELES, CAL. 





2 

15 
1 

7 

50 

480 

49 

10 


64.26 

747. 35 

825. 03 

20. 14 

3,074.16 

223. 45 

81,291.90 
[10, 070. 28] 

[1,480.00] 






$80. 22 








1, 866. 79 


Sales of mineral lands 






4, 105. 00 
25. 18 


Sales of land under act Feb. 28, 1889 






Sales of land under act Mar. 3, 1887 

Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






2, 797. 00 
310. 53 


Original entries under the desert-land act . 
Final entries under the desert-land act 






20,323.08 
10, 070. 29 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






2, 050. 00 








Total cash sales 


621 

315 

151 

1,641 

20 

„ 
/ 

4 
1 


86, 246. 29 
46 326 86 






41,(i2S,09 




.«•? 027 81 


$3, 000. 00 


5,037.81 
1 012 58 




[22,141.60]! L012.58 

262,224.87 | 

| 


Lands selected under grants to railroads . . . 
Applications to purchase mineral lands 


3, 282. 00 
200. 00 

70.00 

12. 00 
3.00 
16. 00 

1,043.56 


3, 282. 00 
200. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




70.00 


Soldiers and sailors' homestead declara- 
tor statements 




12 00 


Coal-land declaratory statements 




3 00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 




16.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1,043.56 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,760 


391,798.02 


3,050.39 7,626.56 


52, 305. 04 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 








6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 








4, 250. 00 










Total 








10, 250. 00 








I 





232 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land office, etc. — Continued. 

MARYSVILLE, CAL. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




9 
1 
5 
23 

9 

4 


827. 40 

160. 00 

600. 00 

2, 329. 64 

49.03 

[560. 00] 






$1,435.13 
200. 00 








Sales of timber and stone lands 






1, 500. 00 






6, 362. 50 
83.61 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 




Homestead entries commuted to cash under 
section 2301, R. S 




1,000.00 








Total cash sales 


51 

82 


3, 966. 07 
11,677.88 
[5, 151. 26] 
312. 61 
3, 193. 71 
25.00 




10, 581. 24 


Original homestead entries 


$574. 68 ff755. 00 


1, 329. 68 




38 


235. 26 




235. 26 




3 
16 

1 
24 

5 




6.00 
32.00 


6.00 






32.00 








Applications to purchase mineral lands . . . 
Applications to purchase timber and stone 




240. 00 
50. 00 
173. 51 


240. 00 






50 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






173. 51 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


220 


19, 175. 27 


809. 94 


1,256.51 


12, 647. 69 




Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










2, 524. 01 
342. 66 






















Total , 










2, 866. 67 















REDDING, CAL. 





7 

264 

41 

38 

9 


360.00 
41,274.31 
2,807.57 

281.16 

n . 224, 231 


1 


$450. 00 


Sales of timber and stone lands 





103, 186. 04 






13, 040. 00 
377. 11 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 


i 


Homestead entries commuted to cash under 
section 2301, R. S 


i 


1, 530. 28 












359 44,723.04 
182 1 26,667.36 

82 1 [11,554.67] 
408 1 64,605.47 

96 | 13,419.62 
2 390 nn 




118, 583. 43 

3, 392. 59 

759. 77 




$1, 657. 59 
759. 77 


$1, 735. 00 




Lands selected under grants to railroads .. 


816. 00 
192. 00 


816. 00 




192. 00 








Applications to purchase mineral lands ... 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 

lands 


32 






320. 00 

2, 630. 00 
30.00 


320. 00 


263 
3 

1 




2, 630. 00 






30.00 






3.00 
767. 80 


3.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 


1 


767.80 









Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,428 


149,735.49 2,417.36 6,493.80 


127, 494. 59 


Salaries, fees, and commissons of register 







6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 






1,496.56 






: ::::::.::::: 


136. 45 










Total 






| 


7, 633. 01 













REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 233 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




4 

35 
33 

8 
2 
2 

17 


160. 00 

5, 398. 47 
2, 349. 71 

41.07 
80.00 
[80. 00] 

[2, 537. 78] 






$200. 00 








13, 496. 68 








7, 707. 50 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






51.33 


Original entries under the desert-land act.. 






20.00 






80.00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301 R S 






3, 172. 23 








101 
143 

58 
43 

18 
30 

35 

1 


8, 029. 25 
19,647.39 

[8,589.17] 
6, 752. 62 
2, 029. 02 






24, 727. 74 




$775. 52 
414. 14 


$1,295.00 


2, 070. 52 




414. 14 


Lands selected under grants to railroads... 


86.00 

36.00 

300. 00 

350. 00 
10.00 

1,370.20 


86.00 




36.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 




300. 00 






3.50. 00 








10.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






1,3*70.20 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


429 


36, 458. 28 


1,189.66 


3, 447. 20 


29, 364. 60 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










4, 836. 40 


Incidental expenses 










971.95 














Total 








' 


5, 808. 35 















SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Sales of land at public auction 


33 

52 

7 

61 
37 


1, 748. 38 

6, 565. 18 

434. 15 

271.33 

[4,530.16] 






$2, 387. 26 
16, 432. 95 
1,224.42 

339. 81 

5, 462. 73 


Sales of timber and stone lands 






Sales of mineral lands 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations.. 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 













Total cash sales 


190 

517 

245 

1 

1 

42 

126 

5 

52 
2 


9,019.04 

75, 055. 30 

[35, 676. 06] 

[160. 00] 

40.00 

6, 613. 88 

13, 755. 11 






25, 847. 17 

7, 807. 59 

1,406.75 

4.00 




$2, 942. 59 
1, 406. 75 


$4,865.00 


Final homestead entries 


Final entries under the timber-culture laws. 


4.00 


Lands entered with Valentine scrip 




1.00 1.00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 




84.00 84.00 


State selections 




252. 00 252. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




50. 00 50. 00 






520.00 , 520.00 








6.00 1 6.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






791.61 1 791.61 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,181 


104, 483. 33 


4, 349 ; 34 


6, 573. 61 


36, 770. 12 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6,000.00 












2, 250. 17 












Total 








8, 250. 17 











234 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

STOCKTON, CAL. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




6 

9 

24 

19 

12 


240. 00 
961. 18 
684. 27 

71.90 

[1, 458. 79] 






$350. 00 


Sales of timber and stone lands 






2, 402. 95 








2 970 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






89.89 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 






1, 823. 49 












70 
181 

62 
1 
2 
9 


1,957.35 

26, 607. 77 

[9, 320. 22] 

[80. 00] 

120.00 

1, 278. 93 






7, 636. 33 
2, 738. 29 




$1,008.29 
349. 52 


$1,730.00 




349. 52 




4.00 

4.00 


4.00 






4.00 








Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 


26 




260. 00 

90.00 
10.00 

1,373.44 


260. 00 


9 
1 






90.00 








10.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






1,373.44 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


361 


29, 964. 05 


1, 357. 81 


3, 471. 44 


12, 465. 58 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










4,299.86 












9 04 












19. 65 














Total ' 










4, 328. 55 













SUSANVILLE, CAL. 





55 


7. 576. 36 






$18, 940. 95 




5 490. 00 






1,225.00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 


45 

43 

6 

8 


175.92 

8, 760. 45 
[787. 04] 

[1,159.56] 






420. 74 


Original entries under the desert land act. 






2, 190. 16 


Final entries under the desert land act 






787. 04 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 






1,449.45 












162 

78 

38 

268 

1 

3 

52 

1 


17, 002. 73 
12, 042. 92 
[5, 450. 89] 
37, 137. 00 
160. 90 






25, 013. 34 




$451. 60 
219. 26 


$765. 00 


1,216.60 




219.26 




536. 00 


536. 00 








Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 




30.00 

520. 00 
3.00 
7.00 


30.00 






520. 00 








3.00 








7.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1,850.57 1,850.57 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


603 


66, 343. 55 


670. 86 


3, 711. 57 


29, 395. 77 


Salaries, fees and commissions of register 
and receiver 








5, 123. 69 


Incidental expenses 








2, 478. 07 










Total 


1 ! i 


7, 601. 76 




i 1 i 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 235 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

VISALIA, CAL. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




3 
4 
12 

38 
10 
1 

6 


200. 00 

480. 00 
1,800.37 

253. 80 

1,913.00 

[80. 00] 

[760. 00] 






$350. 00 








1 , 200. 00 








4, 607. 78 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






465. 90 


Original entries under the desert land act. . 






478. 25 






80.00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301 R. S... 






1,550.00 












74 
142 
41 

2 
43 

8 
19 

4 
4 


4,647.17 
21,621.17 
[6,144.99] 

[291. 42] 
6,749.17 
1,280.00 






8,731.93 




81, 110. 96 
302. 50 


$1,370.00 


2, 480. 96 




302. 50 




8.00 

86.00 

16.00 

190. 00 

40.00 

40.00 

6.00 

665. 33 


8.00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 




86.00 




16.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 




190. 00 






40.00 








40.00 








6.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








665. 33 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amounts received therefrom 


337 


34, 297. 51 


1,413.46 


2,421.33 12,566.72 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








3, 639. 40 

390. 72 

4.20 






• 




















Total 










4, 034. 32 













AKRON. COLO. 





2 

16 
5 

1 

7 


88.53 

35.25 
1,120.52 

[80. 00] 

[1, 117. 04] 






$110,67 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






44.07 


Original entries under the desert land act. . 






280. 13 






80.00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der- section 2301, R. S . . . 






1, 396. 30 












31 

186 
48 
64 
49 

1 

22 


1,244.30 
28,591.35 
[7, 477. 48] 
[10,196.21] 

7, 695. 94 






1,911.17 


Original homestead entries 


$1,075.23 
280. 44 


$1,800.00 


2, 875. 23 


Final homestead entries 


280.44 


Final entries under the timber-culture laws. 


256. 00 
98.00 


256. 00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads .. 
Soldiers and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 




98.00 




3.00 

66.00 

4.00 

481.90 


3.00 


Reservoir declaratory statements 






66.00 








4.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








481. 90 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


401 


37,531.59 


1,355.67 ' 2,708.90 


5, 975. 74 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 








3, 302. 78 










233. 16 


Expense of depositing public moneys 








5.20 












Total 








3, 541. 14 










1 





236 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

DEL NORTE, COLO. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




3 

7 
30 

8 
12 


199.29 
640. 00 
660. 06 

23.84 
2,919.75 
[1,043.31] 

[1,098.20] 






$249. 13 


Sales of timber and stone lands 




1,600.00 




::;;;:;::;;;;::;;:: 


3, 381. 27 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 




29.81 


Origiual enteries under the desert land act. 
Final enteries under the desert land act . . . 




729. 94 







1 , 043. 31 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 




1,372.75 












76 
76 
31 


4, 442. 94 
11,225.37 

F4.4K8. 141 




8,406.21 
1,141.35 




$421. 35 
168.68 


$720. 00 




168. 68 




5 f800. 001 


20. 00 


20.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 


19 
17 






190. 00 
170. 00 


190. 00 






170.00 




1 






10.00 
123. 24 


10.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






123. 24 








Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


225 15,668.31 590.03 1,233.24 1 10,229.48 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 


! 
i 


2, 271. 40 


Incidental expenses 


i i i 


402. 79 




! ! I 


1.10 








Total 








2, 675. 29 











DENVER, COLO. 



Sales of land at public auction 


28 
114 

278 

56 
130 
32 

29 


1,735.92 

15, 788. 72 
4, 616. 72 

204. 67 
24, 152. 59 
[6, 319. 07] 

[4, 320. 00] 


1 


$2, 531. 94 




39,471.93 

18, 977. 50 

342. 87 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 




Original enteries under the desert land act. 




6, 038. 46 
6, 319. 05 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301 R. S 




5, 700. 00 










667 

579 

227 

10 

7 

4 

254 

114 
39 

1 

101 

2 


46, 498. 62 

86,359.41 

[33, 280. 37] 

[1, 560. 00] 

1, 092. 56 

560. 00 




79,381.75 


Original homestead entries 


$4, 307. 23 «5. 510. 00 


9,817.23 




1, 638. 27 




1,638.27 




40.00 


40.00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads... 




14.00 

8.00 

2,540.00 

1, 140. 00 
390. 00 

3.00 

303. 00 

6.00 

75.00 

994. 85 


14.00 




8.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands ... 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 

lands 




2, 540. 00 






1, 140. 00 


Mineral protests, adverse claims 






390. 00 


Soldiers and sailors' homestead declara- 






3.00 








303. 00 








6.00 








75. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








994. 85 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2, 005 


134, 510. 59 


5, 945. 50 


11,023.85 


96, 351. 10 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










2,539.40 












Total 










8, 539. 40 













REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 237 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
DURANGO, COLO. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




78 
114 

6 
4 

2 

18 


10,474.51 
2, 484. 88 

37.36 






$26, 186. 29 








12, 192. 50 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






46.70 


Original entries under the desert-land act . 


291.98 
[200. 00] 

[2,394.64] 






73.00 






200. 00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 






2, 993. 30 












222 
103 
44 
51 
2 
39 
10 


13, 288. 73 
14,513.23 
[5, 578. 10] 

6, 571. 13 
[160. 00] 

5, 475. 37 
[1,282.64] 






41,691.79 




$544. 29 
208. 21 
246. 43 
6.00 
202. 31 
48.10 

24. 60 


$935. 00 


1,479.29 




208. 21 


original homestead entries, Ute 


425. 00 


671. 43 
6.00 


Original homestead entries, Southern Ute.. 


350.00 


552. 31 
48.10 


Commissions on commuted homesteads, 




24.60 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 


135 

93 
15 
31 






1,350.00 

930. 00 

150.00 

93.00 

4.00 

697. 93 


1, 350. 00 






930. 00 








150. 00 








93.00 








4.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








697. 93 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


745 


39, 848. 46 


1,279.94 i 4,934.93 


47, 906. 66 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








6, 000. 00 










1, 433. 98 












Total 








7, 433. 98 












Cash sales of Southern Ute lands: 


15 
52 
11 
12 


2,081.69 
9, 203. 46 
[2,215.00] 
[1,440.00] 
1.12 
[80. 00] 




5, 204. 23 


Original desert 




2, 300. 89 






2, 215. 00 
1,780.00 










1.41 




1 




100. 00 










94 
1 


f [3, 735. 00] 
1 11,286.27 

3.70 


1 




11,601.53 


Excesses on homestead entrv under 
act July 28, 1882 . 


1 




4. 63 


Total 








95 


\ [3, 735. 00] 
\ 11,289.97 


1 1 


11,606.16 


1 1 





GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLO, 



Sales of land at public auction 


1 
39 
4 

86 

28 
117 

7 

18 


40.00 

4, 989. 18 

28.44 

17,175.13 

92.33 
17, 036. 69 

[1,25/22] 

[2, 638. 63] 






$52. 00 


Sales of timber and stone lands 






12, 472. 97 
150. 00 


Sales of mineral lands 






Sales of coal lands 






171,751.30 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 






116.49 


Original entries under the desert-land act. . 






4, 259. 25 


Pinal entries under the desert-land act 






1, 251. 22 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






3,298.29 










Total cash sales 


300 

286 

31 

86 
4 


39,361.77 
43, 584. 88 
[4, 876. 64] 

13, 047. 22 
[640. 00] 






193,351.52 


Original homestead entries 


$1,634.52 

182. 88 

489. 26 
24.00 

6.00 


$2, 775. 00 


4, 409. .52 
182. 88 


Original homestead entries, Ute Indian 
lands 

Final homestead entries, Ute Indian lands. 


835. 00 


1,324.26 

24.00 


Commissions on commuted homesteads, 
Ute Indian lands 




6.00 


State selections 


237 

8 


37, 825. 47 


474. 00 
80. 00 


474. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




80.00 



238 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
GREENWOOD SRPINGS, COLO.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 


47 

81 

2 

702 






$470. 00 
243. 00 

6.00 

2, 106. 00 

1.00 


$470 00 


Preemption declaratory statements 

Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






243 00 






6.00 








2 106 00 








1.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






1,804.28 


1,804.28 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,784 


133,819.34 


$2, 336. 66 


8, 794. 28 


204, 482. 46 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








6, 000. 00 










2, 296. 39 
85.40 




















Total 










8, 381. 79 
















28 
8 
4 
53 
29 
1 
7 
2 


3, 760. 71 

840. 00 

87.52 

7, 003. 63 

[3,038.61] 

[160. 00] 

13.02 

80.00 






4, 700. 92 
2, 100. 00 


Timber and stone 












445. 00 








1,750.93 








3, 038. 61 
200. 00 
















16.30 






1,200.00 










Total 


132 


J [3, 198. 61] 
\ 11,781.88 


} 




13, 451. 76 




J 





GUNNISON, COLO. 





2 

27 
13 

7 

1 


240. 00 

665. 01 
979. 19 

[1,121.51] 

[80. 00] 






$600. 00 

3,275.00 

244. 80 

1,121.51 

100. 00 








Original entries under the desert-land act . 










Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 














50 

21 

6 

21 
46 

10 
14 
16 
80 


1, 884. 20 






5, 341. 31 

302. 38 

31.41 

328. 00 




2, 996. 92 
[837. 59] 

3, 280. 00 


$112. 38 
31.41 

123.00 


$190. 00 




original homestead entries, Ute Indian 
lands 


205. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 


460. 00 






100. 00 
140. 00 
48.00 
240. 00 

197. 46 


100. 00 








140. 00 


Preemption declaratory statements 


1 


48.00 






240. 00 


Amounts received for reducing testimony 






197. 46 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amounts received therefrom 


264 


8, 161. 12 


266. 79 


1, 580. 46 


7, 188. 56 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








2, 676. 60 










155. 60 






i 




6.15 








Total 








2, 838. 35 














Cash sales, Ute Indian lands: 

Preemption 


6 
8 
6 
12 
4 
2 


920. 00 
920. 00 
327. 98 
2, 600. 00 
[360. 00] 
.40 






1, 150. 00 






2, 300. 00 








1,417.50 
650. 00 














360. 00 








.50 










Total 


38 


/ [360. 00] 
t 4, 768. 38 


1 L 


5, 878. 00 




/ 





KEPOET OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 239 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

HUGO, COLO. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 


8 
5 

1 


16.56 






$38. 87 


Original entries under the desert-land act - 


882. 05 
[160. 00] 







220. 51 






160. 00 












14 

140 

11 

7 
4,674 

2 


898. 61 
22, 202. 75 






419. 38 




ffil . 43'? SO 


$1,390.00 


2, 822. 30 




[1,679.84] 


99.00 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


[1,120.00] 
747, 370. 62 




28.00 


28.00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads . . 
Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 





9, 348. 00 9, 3 18. 00 
6.00 6.00 







2.00 2.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






77.10 77.10 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


4,848 


770,471.98 


1,531.30 


10, 851. 10 


12, 801. 78 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 




] 




6, 000. 00 











185. 62 












Total 








6, 185. 62 













LAMAR, COLO. 



Sales of land at public auction 


2 
2 

15 


56.90 

188. 96 

46. 53 






$71.97 








472. 40 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and loca- 






58.15 


Original entries under the desert-land act. 
Final entries under the desert-land act 


11 ! 1,440.25 
3 [255.08] 

11 [1,656.44] 






360. 07 






255. 08 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 






2, 070. 55 












44 1,732.64 
143 21 . 668. 91 






3, 288. 22 




SSI 9. 60 


$1, 375. 00 


2, 194. 60 


Final homestead entries 


32 

11 

1,457 

4 

2 


[4,307.47] 160.71 


160. 71 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


[2, 228. 16] 
232, 717. 13 




56. 00 

2,914.00 

8.00 

20.00 
82.00 

206. 61 


56. 00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads .. 
State selections 




2, 914. 00 


640. 00 




8.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 




20.00 








82.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








206. 61 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,696 


256, 758. 68 


980. 31 


4, 661. 61 


8, 930. 14 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










5, 362. 66 


Incidental expenses 










237. 48 














Total 










5, 600. 14 















240 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

LEADVILLE, COLO. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Sales of land at public auction 


1 

7 
127 

1 

1 


20.00 
730. 24 






$25. 00 








1, 825. 60 
18, 707. 50 

64.45 




4, 592. 24 

51. 55 
160. 00 






Sales of land under act Sept, 10, 1890 (20 
Stats., 502) 






Original entries under the desert-land act. . 






40.00 










137 
21 
17 

100 

7 
6 


5, 554. 03 
2, 800. 00 






20, 662. 55 
290. 00 


Original homestead entries 




$105.00 


$ 185. 00 


Final homestead entries 


[2, 680. 00] 100. 50 


100. 50 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 


1,000.00 

70.00 
60.00 

153. 10 


1,000 00 




70.00 







60.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 




153. 10 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


288 


8, 354. 03 


205. 50 


1,468.10 


22, 336. 15 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








2,901.85 








1,488.86 
19.30 


















Total 








4,410.01 






1 





MONTROSE, COLO. 





1- 
19 
bl 

2 
1 

3 


40.00 

2, 393. 40 

790. 50 

8.88 
315. 12 

[479. 54] 
.30 






$100. 00 
5, 983. 50 
3,735.00 

11.10 

78.78 

599. 43 
.38 














Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Original entries under the desert-land act. 

Homestead entries commuted to cash 

under section 2301, R. S 


























57 
50 
24 
210 
1 
40 

54 

2 

103 

73 


3, 548. 20 

7,272.12 

[3, 680. 00] 

27, 546. 93 

[160. 00] 






10, 508. 19 

743. 16 

138. 00 

2, 870. 44 

6.00 

400. 00 




$273. 16 

138. 00 

1,035.44 

6.00 


$470. 00 




Original homestead entries, Ute lands 


1, 835. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 


400. 00 






540.00 540.00 








20.00 ! 20.00 


Preemption declaratory statements 






309. 00 309. 00 

219. 00 219. 00 

3.00 , 3.00 

792. 39 792. 39 









1 






Amount received for reducing testimony 













Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


615 38,367.25 ' 1,452.60 4,588.39 


16, 549. 18 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 




5, 534. 56 






1,316.47 









Total 


i 


6,851.03 








Cash sales, Ute Indian lands: 


48 
35 
97 
35 

7 
5 


6, 400. 36 


! 


8, 000. 49 




3, 885. 28 

11, 370. 10 

[4, 849. 36] 

13.53 

200. 00 




9,712.89 

2, 842. 49 










4, 849. 36 






16.93 
4, 000. 00 


Coal 











Total 


22 7 J [4,849.36] 


\ 


29, 422. 16 






l -zi,my.-zi 


1 i 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 241 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

PUEBLO, COLO. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




18 
70 
79 
11 

68 

104 

16 

42 


928. 34 
8, 168. 22 
1,527.57 
1,240.00 

212. 81 
20,566.79 
[2, 779. 94] 

Tfi. 041 . 391 




v 


$1,226.42 








20, 420. 54 








7, 495. 00 








24, 800. 00 
265. 99 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Original entries nnder the desert-land act. . 






5,141.68 
2, 779. 94 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301 R S 






7, 551. 74 




J 










408 

672 

225 

6 

71 

77 

60 

70 
15 

2 
71 

1 


32, 643. 73 
101, 328. 83 
[31,870.82] 
[960. 00] 
11, 338. 90 
12, 009. 75 






69,681.31 




$3,841.84 
1,201.01 


$6,455.00 


10, 296. 84 




1,201.01 
24.00 




24.00 
142. 00 
1.54. 00 
600. 00 

700.00 
150. 00 

6.00 

213. 00 

3.00 

33.00 

1,307.03 


Lands selected under grants to railroads . . 




142. 00 




154. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands . . . 
Applications to purchase timber and stone 




600. 00 






700. 00 








150. 00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






6.00 








213. 00 








3.00 








33.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1, 307. 03 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,678 


157,321.21 


5,042.85 


9, 787. 03 


84, 511. 19 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 










4, 744. 50 










Total 










10, 744. 50 













STERLING, COLO. 





3 

1 
13 


159.07 

12.92 

875. 49 
[80. 00] 

[1, 811. 18] 






$242 84 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






23.11 


Original entries under the desert-land act . 






218. 87 


Final entries under the desert-land act 






80.00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






2, 263. 97 






Total cash sales 


37 
141 

26 

1 

41 

14 


1,047.48 

21,570.59 

[3, 679. 60] 

[160. 00] 

6, 474. 66 






2, 828. 79 
2, 317. 32 


Original homestead entries 


$952. 32 
153.00 


$1, 365. 00 




153. 00 




4.00 
82.00 
42.00 
139. 00 

289. 70 


4.00 






82. 00 


Reservoir declaratory statements 




42.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






139.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony- 








289. 70 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


260 


29,092.73 


1,105.32 


1, 921. 70 


5,855.81 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 




1 




2, 718. 58 
404. 80 


Incidental expenses 




| 












5.10 










Total 




| 




3, 128. 48 






I 





8970- 



242 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

GAINESVILLE, FLA. 



Class of entry. 



Num- 
ber. 



Acres. 



Commis- 
sions. 



Fees. 



Amount. 



Sales of lands at private entry 

Sales of lands at public auction 

•Sales of timber and stone lands 

Sales of abandoned military reservations, 
under acts Aug. 23, 1894, and Feb. 15, 1895. . 

Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 

Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 

Supplemental payment 



11 

660 



145 

1 



159. 95 

160. 08 

2, 613. 42 

[1,475.89] 

552. 58 

[17, 914. 89] 



Total cash sales 

Original homestead entries 

Final homestead entries , 

Lands entered with military bounty land 
warrants , 

State selections 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 

Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 

Amount received for cancellation notices. 

Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 



848 

1,913 

464 

1 

19 

26 
1 



Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 



3, 272 



Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 

and receiver 

Incidental expenses 

Expense of depositing public moneys 



Total 



3, 486. 03 
247, 451. 72 
[53, 556. 94] 

160. 00 
1, 814. 78 



$6, 191. 37 
1, 339. 87 



$16, 485. 00 



4.00 
38.00 

260. 00 

2.00 
22.00 

1, 129. 16 



252, 912. 53 



7,531.24 



17, 940. 16 



$199. 94 

210. 50 

6, 533. 58 

1,022.09 

692. 56 

22, 393. 47 
1.25 



31, 053. 39 

22, 676. 37 

1, 339. 87 

4.00 
38.00 

260. 00 

2.00 
22.00 



56, 524. 79 



6, 000. 00 

4, 996. 60 

24. 25 



11, 020. 85 



BLACKFOOT, IDAHO. 





7 
16 

49 

41 
213 
114 

28 


272. 79 
1, 930. 45 

[5, 297. 77] 

128. 11 
28, 346. 16 
[16, 307. 62] 

[3, 836. 88] 






$340. 99 








4, 826. 15 

3, 233. 87 
160. 42 


Sales of abandoned military reservations, 
payments on Fort Hall ceded Indian 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Original entries under the desert-land act.. 






7, 086. 78 
16, 307. 62 

4, 876. 45 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301 R S . 
















468 
476 
325 


30, 677. 51 
63, 305. 77 
[48, 085. 64] 






36, 832. 28 




$2, 357. 74 
1, 808. 83 

43.50 


$4, 120. 00 


6, 477. 74 




1,808.83 


Commissions on commuted lands, Fort 




43.50 




56 

16 
2 
2 


8, 707. 88 


112. 00 

160. 00 
6.00 
6.00 

961. 57 


112. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 




160. 00 








6.00 








6.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






961. 57 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,345 


102. 691. 16 


4, 210. 07 


5, 365. 57 


46, 407. 92 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 












2, 480. 70 
9.10 
























Total 










8, 489. 80 




7 











€ash sales— Shoshone and Bannock Indian 
lands: 








70.00 













REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 243 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
BOISE CITY, IDAHO. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber, 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




2 

459 

19 

64 

160 

42 

64 


40. 13 

67,751.96 

1, 638. 82 

392. 18 
26, 268. 68 
[6,686.98] 

[8, 258. 47] 






$50. 16 








169, 379. 89 
6,085.00 

490. 25 








Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Original entries under the desert-land act . 






6,567.29 
6, 695. 00 

10, 323. 10 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301 R. S 














810 
854 
116 

1 

18 
74 
17 

459 

3 

8 


96, 091. 77 
120,591.56 
[16, 273. 27] 

[160. 00] 
2, 640. 00 
11, 731. 97 






199, 590. 69 

12,306.76 

610. 26 




$4, 521. 76 
610. 26 


$7,785.00 




Final entries under the timber-culture 


4.00 
36.00 
148. 00 
170.00 

4, 590. 00 

9.00 
24.00 
12.00 

1, 601. 70 


4.00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 


36.00 




148. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 




170. 00 






4,590.00 
9.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 












24.00 








12.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1, 601. 70 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,360 


231,055.30 


5,132.02 


14, 379. 70 


219, 102. 41 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6,000.00 
3,188.14 






















Total 










9, 188. 14 













COUER D'ALENE, IDAHO. 





3 

328 

37 

58 

82 


74.00 

43, 703. 99 

1,456.23 

258. 19 

[11, 356. 35] 






$211. 75 








109, 260. 05 
6, 610. 00 

505. 08 


Sales of mineral lands 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






18, 751. 55 












508 
495 
151 


45, 492. 41 
65, 000. 05 
[22, 160. 93] 






135,338.43 

8, 483. 35 

1,586.75 

328. 80 




$4, 198. 35 

1, 586. 75 

328. 80 


$4, 285. 00 








Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 


217 

86 
4 
36 

326 
1 

1 


33, 788. 72 

12, 861. 64 

330. 77 


434. 00 
172. 00 


434. 00 






172. 00 








Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




360.00 

3, 260. 00 
10.00 

3.00 
46.00 

1, 155. 10 


360. 00 






3, 260. 00 








10.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 






3.00 








46.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1,155.10 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,825 


157, 473. 59 


6, 113. 90 


9, 725. 10 


151, 177. 43 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










2, 570. 46 














Total 










8, 570. 46 















244 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

HAILEY, IDAHO. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Sales of land at public auction 

Sales of timber and stone lands 


3 
3 
12 

.14 

91 
34 

11 


120. 00 
240. 00 
512. 76 

83.55 
13, 674. 74 
[3, 105. 65] 

[1,240.00] 






$150. 00 






600. 00 








1, 855. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 






104. 44 


Original entries under the desert land act . 






3, 418. 77 


Final entries under the desert land act 






3, 105, 65 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301;- R: B 






1,550.00 










Total cash sales 


168 
402 

65 

2 

104 

10 

3 

1 


14, 631. 05 
52, 494. 16 
[9,071.03] 
[240. 00] 
16, 612. 93 






10, 783. 86 

5, 388. 39 

340. 15 


Original homestead entries 


81, 968. 39 
340. 15 


$3, 420. 00 


Final homestead entries 


Final entries under the timber-culture laws. 


8.00 
208. 00 
100. 00 

30.00 
10.00 

83.00 


8.00 






208 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




100. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 






30.00 


Mineral protests, adverse claims 






10.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






83.00 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


755 


83,738.14 


2, 308. 54 


3, 859. 00 


16, 951. 40 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










3, 963. 22 
327. 92 


Incidental expenses 










Expense of depositing public moneys... 










40.70 














Total 










4, 331. 84 















LEWISTON, IDAHO. 



Sales of land at public auction 


4 

216 

14 

1 

1 

50 
5 

64 


129. 71 

27,345.29 

993. 79 

60.00 

.71 

230. 03 
862. 28 

[7, 676. 20] 






$162. 14 


Sales of timber and stone lands 






68, 813. 19 


Sales of mineral lands 






4, 270. 00 
225. 00 


Sale of town site 






Supplemental pavment 






2.66 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 






287. 51 


Original entries under the desert land act . 






215. 57 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






11, 445. 99 








Total cash sales 


355 
901 

464 


29, 621. 81 
119, 383. 44 






85, 422. 06 


Original homestead entries 


«4. 466. 07 


$7, 865. 00 


12, 331. 07 

2, 427. 62 


Final homestead entries 


[64, 728. 23] 2. 427. 62 


Commissions on commuted homesteads— 
Nez Perce Reservation 




42.76 




42.76 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 


69 
762 

8 

216 

4 
1 


10, 840. 00 
120, 951. 29 


138. 00 

1,312.00 

80.00 

2, 160. 00 
12.00 
3.00 
3.00 

1, 079. 70 


138. 00 


State selections 




1, 312. 00 
80.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 






2, 160. 00 
12.00 


Coal land declaratory statements 






Town site declaratory statements 






3.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices. . 






3.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1,079.70 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,780 


280, 796. 54 


6, 936. 45 


12,652.70 


105, 011. 21 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver , 










6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










3, 448. 48 


Expense of depositing public moneys 










133. 95 














Total 










9,582.43 













REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 245 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
DES MOINES, IOWA. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
b 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 


2 

1 
6 


21.66 
160.00 
[720. 00] 






$54. 16 


Sale of land under act of Mar. 3, 1887 (29 
Stats. 6) .. 






215. 22 


Cash substitution for military bounty land 






800.00 












9 
5 

7 


181. 66 
377. 03 
[409. 97] 






1,069.38 
47.67 




$12. 67 
20.56 


$35. 00 




20.56 


Amount received for reducing testimony 


964. 39 


964. 39 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


21 


558. 69 


33.23 


999. 39 


2, 102. 00 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










2, 019. 00 












97.94 














Total 










2, 116. 94 















COLBY, KANS. 





21 
1 

8 

16 

46 
227 
103 

22 


1, 306. 94 
[160. 00] 

24.67 

[1, 677. 29] 






$1,633.68 








Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations.. 






30.84 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






2, 196. 62 










Total cash sales 


1,331.61 

31, 592. 70 

[15, 083. 41] 

[3, 520. 00] 






3,861.14 


Original homestead entries 


$942. 81 
469. 06 


$2, 060. 00 


3, 002. 81 




469. 06 




88.00 
24.00 

1, 093. 92 


88.00 






24.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1.093.92 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


398 


32, 924. 31 


1,411.87 


3, 265. 92 


8, 538. 93 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










3, 695. 02 


Incidental expenses 










1,108.72 


Expense of depositing public moneys 








1.40 












Total 




| 




4, 805. 14 






1 







DODGE CITY, KANS. 



Sales of land at public auction 


14 
42 
27 


782. 37 

66.02 

[4, 101. 09] 






$977. 97 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 






116. 16 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






5, 326. 36 










Total cash sales 


83 
837 

77 

113 

28 

18 
9 


848. 39 
129, 863. 68 






6, 420. 49 
12, 063. 51 


Original homestead entries 


»3. 858 51 


$8, 205. 00 


Final homestead entries 


[11, 606. 08] 366. 64 


366. 64 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


[17,953.48] 




452. 00 
56.00 

36.00 
18.00 
45.00 

756. 19 


452. 00 


Preemption declaratory statements 




56.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 






36.00 


Reservoir declarators statements . . , 






18.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






45.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








756. 19 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,165 


130,712.07 


4, 225. 15 


9, 568. 19 


20, 213. 83 



246 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
DODGE CITY, KANS.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










$6, 000. 00 

2, 312. 43 

8.75 


































Total 










8, 321. 18 












Receipts from sales of Osage trust and di- 
minished reserve lands: 


146 
9 

[31] 


9,591.34 
1,327.02 
[4, 175. 70] 






11,989.16 
414. 70 








Subsequent payments to first payments. 






2, 155. 98 
152. 99 


















Total 


J [31] 
\ 155 


[4, 175. 70] 
10, 918. 36 


1 




14, 712. 83 




J 







TOPEKA, KANS. 



Sales of land at public auction 


1 

1 
5 

1 


80.00 

7.50 

[240. 00] 

[160. 00] 






$200. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






9.38 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






400.00 


Cash substitution for military bounty land 
warrant 






200. 00 












8 
29 
22 

4 


87.50 
1,892.59] 
[1, 926. 58] 






809. 38 




$91. 13 
89.48 


$155. 00 


246. 13 




89.48 




8.00 
134. 22 


8.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






134. 22 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


63 


1,980.09 


180. 61 


297. 22 


1,287.21 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










1, 346. 10 
63.28 


Incidental expenses 




















1.30 














Total 










1,410.68 












Receipts from sales of Osage trust and di- 
minished reserve lands: 


1 
[12] 


40.00 

40.00 

[519. 13] 






50.00 








12.50 


Payments subsequent to first payment. . 
Interest pavments 






224. 46 






24. 79 














Total 


J [12] 
\ 2 


[519. 13] 
80.00 


} 




311. 75 




J 






Receipts from sales of "Kansas trust and 
diminished reserve lands:" 
Payments subsequent to first payment. 
Interest payments 


[2] 


[162. 28] 






35.48 






10.45 














Total 


[2] 


[162. 28] 






45.93 











WAKEENEY, KANS. 





24 
33 
22 


1,423.70 
62.91 

[2,756.85] 






$1,899.64 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations.. 

Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S . . . 






110. 46 






3, 596. 07 












79 

585 

98 

35 


1,486.61 
89, 331. 51 






5, 606. 17 


Original homestead entries 


83. 119. 08 


$5,640.00 


8, 759. 08 




[14,565.97 616.85 


616.85 


Final entries under timber-culture laws . . . 


5,573.92] 





i46. 66 


140. 00 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 247 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
WAKEENEY, KANS.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 
Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


8 

7 


1, 194. 51 




$16. 00 

14.00 
42.00 

420.24 


$16. 00 




14.00 








42.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








420. 24 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


812 


92, 012. 63 


$3,735.93 


6, 272. 24 


15, 614. 34 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










5, 480. 22 












1, 372. 51 












11.40 














Total 










6, 864. 13 













NATCHITOCHES, LA. 





46 

1 

75 

81 
2 


5, 576. 91 
[155. 50] 
132. 92 

[9, 702. 66] 

[178. 14] 






$13,942.47 
194. 45 


Sale of abandoned military reservations 






Excess payments of homestead, timber- 






323. 37 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






20, 412. 63 
24.91 


Supplemental payments 














205 
364 
169 

8 
6 

46 


5, 709. 83 
30, 062. 44 

[17, 489. 28] 

638. 71 
239. 92 






34, 897. 83 




$1,054.23 
579. 43 


$2, 415. 00 


3, 469. 23 
579. 43 




Lands entered with military bounty land 


16.00 


16.00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 








460. 00 
30.00 

1,486.09 


460. 00 








30.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1,486.09 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


798 


36, 650. 90 


1, 633. 66 


4,407.09 


40, 938. 58 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 






5, 323. 69 












2, 195. 52 
10.75 
























Total 










7, 529. 96 















NEW ORLEANS, LA. 





1 
54 

150 
3 
1 

3 

164 

1 


109. 76 
5, 877. 13 

454. 51 
120. 00 
160. 49 

[390. 36] 

[16, 736. 98] 

.78 






$137. 20 








14, 695. 19 
579. 57 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. 






Sales of land under act June 2, 1858 






150. 00 


Sale of land under act Mar. 3, 1887 








Cash substitution for military bounty land 
warrants 






449. 10 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






23, 357. 15 


Supplemental payment 






.98 










Total cash sales 


377 
576 
359 

40 

28 
5 

54 


6, 722. 67 
46, 497. 43 
[35,643.54] 

3, 623. 02 

1, 232. 36 

598. 34 






39, 369. 19 


Original homestead entries 


$1, 267. 03 
996. 42 


$3, 830. 00 


5, 097. 03 


Final homestead entries 


996. 42 


Lands entered with military bounty land 
warrants 


91.00 


91.00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 








10.00 
540. 00 


10.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




540.00 



248 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 








$92. 00 
1,324.71 


$92. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1,324.71 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,439 


58, 673. 82 


$2,263.45 


5,887.71 


47,520.35 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 
3, 639. 03 






















Total 










9, 639. 03 















MARQUETTE, MICH. 





1 

167 

13 
2 

71 
3 


36.70 
12, 273. 19 

70.68 
[331. 76] 

[7, 730. 63] 






$45.88 








30,683.03 

88.36 
414. 70 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. 






Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






9, 663. 30 








185. 00 














257 
353 
146 

5 

1 
1 
4 


12, 380. 57 
34, 132. 80 
[16, 024. 82] 

675. 75 
80.00 
40.00 

240. 00 






41,080.27 
3, 383. 52 


Original homestead entries 


$838. 52 
400. 61 


$2,545.00 


Final homestead entries 


400. 61 


Lands entered with military bounty land 
warrants ^ 


17.00 


17.00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 








1.00 


1.00 








Applications to purchase timber and stone 


167 







1, 670. 00 
30.00 

2, 054. 29 


1, 670. 00 
30.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 







Amount received for reducing testimony 


1 




2, 054. 29 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


934 


47, 549. 12 


1,239.13 


6, 317. 29 


48, 636. 69 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 








6. 000. 00 




::::::::::::;::::::::: 






2, 219. 14 












Total 










8, 219. 14 















CASS LAKE, MINN. 



Sales of land at public auction 


1 
269 

40 
1 

213 


40.00 

34, 659. 72 

281. 54 






$50. 00 








86, 649. 33 
351. 94 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Supplemental payment 






1.00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 


[29,849.79] 






37,312.25 










Total cash sales 


524 
365 
230 

314 

14 

1 
3 


34, 981. 26 
34, 912. 11 

[26,257.38] 

41,339.04 

[2,053.50] 

80.00 
120. 00 






124, 364. 52 




$875. 75 
656. 43 

1,033.49 

51.33 


$2, 635. 00 


3,510.75 
656. 43 


Final homestead entries 


Original homestead entries (Chippewa In- 
dian Reservation) 


2, 780. 00 


3,813.49 
51.33 


Final homestead entries (Chippewa Indian 
Reservation ) 


Lands entered with military bounty land 


2.00 


2.00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 

Final commissions on commuted Indian 
lands 






35.96 




35.96 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 


1 

269 

1 


5.00 


2.00 

2, 690. 00 

2.00 


2.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands '. 




2, 690. 00 
2.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statement 







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 249 

Statement of business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
CASS LAKE, MINN.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 










$34. 00 
1, 141. 01 


$34. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1, 141. 01 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,722 


111,437.41 


$2, 652. 96 


9, 286. 01 


136, 303. 49 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 












3, 866. 76 












37.20 














Total . 










9, 903. 96 














Cash sales— Chippewa Indian lands: 


3 

24 


120. 00 

[2,884.77] 






195. 00 








3, 605. 96 










Total 


27 


J [2, 884. 77] 
\ 120. 00 


1 '. 




3, 800. 96 




J 





CROOKSTON, MINN. 



Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations . 


34 

178 

212 
353 
355 

1,275 

298 

477 

1 


292.56 
[23, 866. 90] 






$365. 68 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






30, 614. 48 












292. 56 
47,457.54 
[50,010.04] 

186, 458. 48 

[44, 915. 65] 

73, 524. 27 

[160. 00] 




30, 980. 16 
4,412.28 




$1,257.28 
1,444.18 

4, 652. 86 

1,118.50 

1, 838. 40 


$3, 155. 00 




1, 444. 18 

16, 642. 86 

1, 118. 50 


Original homestead entries (Chippewa In- 


11,990.00 


Final homestead entries (Chippewa Indian 


Original homesteads (Red Lake Indian 


4, 740. 00 
4.00 


6, 578. 40 
4.00 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


Final commissions on commuted Indian 
lands 


662. 21 


662. 21 


Red Lake and Pembina scrip locations 

Lands selected under grants to railroads... 
Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


2 

2 

2 


480. 00 
216. 74 








4.00 

4.00 
266. 00 

1,613.55 


4.00 




4.00 








266. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1, 613. 55 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,977 


308, 429. 59 


10,973.43 


21, 776. 55 


63, 730. 14 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 
3, 073. 13 























31.33 














Total 










9, 104. 46 














Cash sales, Chippewa Indian lands: 


180 

477 


[26, 486. 95] 
[73, 524. 27] 






33, 108. 71 
95,681.17 


Cash sales, Red Lake Indian Reservation 
ceded lands: 













DULUTH, MINN. 



Sales of land at private entry 


2 
1,163 

330 

113 


56.55 
160, 813. 55 

2,354.26 

[15, 978. 32] 






$70. 69 


Sales of timber and stone lands 






402, 040. 95 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations . 






2, 968. 67 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301 , R. S 






20, 273. 07 










Total cash sales 


1,608 


163, 224. 36 






425, 353. 38 



250 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Statement of 



transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
DULUTH, MINN.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




1,573 

537 

166 
3 

3 

13 
1 


170, 721. 29 
[38,351.69] 

25, 008. 48 

[423. 25] 

440. 00 
653. 50 
40.00 


$4,482.56 
1,026.94 

625. 52 

10.59 


$12, 330. 00 


$16, 812. 56 




1, 026. 94 


Original homestead entries (Chippewa 


1, 600. 00 


2, 225. 52 
10.59 


Final homestead entries (Chippewa Indian 


Lands entered with military bounty land 


11.00 


11.00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 

Lands entered with Sioux half-breed scrip. 

Commissions on Chippewa agricultural 

cash entries 












65.10 




65.10 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. .. 


1 
594 

1,162 

10 


40.00 
93, 805. 43 


2.00 
1, 186. 00 

11,620.00 


2.00 







1, 186. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 




11,620.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 






20.00 
67.00 

2, 258. 87 


20.00 








67.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








2, 258. 87 














Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


5,671 


453, 933. 06 


6, 210. 71 


29, 094. 87 


460, 658. 96 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 






1 


6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 








6,010.75 










Total 








12, 010. 75 












Cash sales, Chippewa Indian lands: 


17 


[2, 441. 37] 






3, 051. 92 











ST. CLOUD, MINN. 



Sales of land at public auction 


2 

8 
2 

22 

1 

75 


53.74 
480. 00 
80.00 

79.17 

[160. 00] 

[5, 977. 74] 






$67. 18 








1,200.00 
200. 00 


Sales of land under act Mar. 3, 1887 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations . 






128. 81 


Cash substitution for military bounty land 
warrant 






200. 00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






9, 421. 91 










Total cash sales 


110 
385 
338 

4 
2 
2 
9 

8 


692. 91 
29, 409. 91 






11,217.90 
3, 636. 19 
1,385.67 

12.00 


Original homestead entries 


n. iifi.i9 


$2, 520. 00 


Final homestead entries 


[35, 297. 17] 1 . 385. 67 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


[200.00] 
44. 65 




12.00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 

Lands entered with Sioux half-breed scrip. 






160. 00 
363. 79 








Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 




18.00 

80.00 
55.00 

883. 87 


18.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




80.00 








55.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








883. 87 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


858 


30, 671. 26 


2, 501. 86 


3,568.87 


17,288.63 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 






4, 774. 98 










1,483.80 
11.36 


Expense of depositing public moneys 


















Total 




I 




6, 270. 13 






1 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 251 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

JACKSON, MISS. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




1 

4 

204 

1 

1 
160 


[80. 00] 
[637. 15] 
733. 75 






$100. 00 


Payments on sales of land under act Mar. 
2, 1895 (28 Stats., 814) 






350. 25 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






• 1,130.04 








1.00 


Cash substitution for military bounty land 


[120. 00] 
[14, 365. 60] 






150. 00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






18, 054. 52 












371 
827 
796 

108 
21 

1 


733. 75 
68, 517. 19 
[78,238.08] 

12, 108. 49 
842.27 






19, 785. 81 




81, 750. 02 
2,011.57 


$5, 515. 00 


7, 265. 02 




2, 011. 57 


Lands entered with military bounty land 


303. 50 


303. 50 


Lands entered with private land scrip 

Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statement 








2.00 
21.00 

1,039.65 


2.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






21.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1, 039. 65 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,124 


82, 201. 70 


3, 761. 59 


6,881.15 


30, 428. 55 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










5, 848. 53 












3,440.60 












17.20 














Total 










9, 306. 33 















BOONVILLE, MO. 





92 

8 
2 


6, 941. 45 

59.14 

[280. 00] 






$8, 676. 98 
73.93 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations . 






Cash substitution 






350. 00 












102 
262 
164 


7, 000. 59 
22, 452. 32 

[14,983.88] 






9, 100. 91 




$561. 36 
374. 57 


$1,745.00 


2,306.36 
374. 57 


Final homestead entries 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 


23.00 
434. 32 


23.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








434. 32 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


528 


29, 452. 91 


935. 93 


2, 202. 32 


12, 239. 16 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










2, 575. 22 


Incidental expenses 










330. 80 












8.60 














Total 










2, 914. 62 













IRONTON, MO. 



Sales of land at private entry 


102 
4 
3 


6,650.17 

15.48 

[163. 00] 






$8, 312. 75 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






19.35 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






203. 75 










Total cash sales 


109 
247 

178 

4 


6, 665. 65 
19, 379. 80 
[15, 993. 91] 






8, 535. 85 


Original homestead entries 


$484. 52 
399. 84 


$1,610.00 


2, 094. 52 


Final homestead entries 


399. 84 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 


8.00 
1.00 


8.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






1.00 



252 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
IRONTON, MO.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








$453. 92 


$453. 92 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


538 


26, 045. 45 


$884. 36 


2, 072. 92 


11,493.13 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










2,518.02 
201. 24 












Expense of depositing public moneys 










16.40 














Total 










2, 735. 66 













SPRINGFIELD, MO. 





94 
16 


8,342.25 
69.95 






$10,705.24 
97.97 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations . 














Total cash sales 


110 
550 
457 

2 


8, 412. 20 
53, 370. 62 
[47, 749. 26] 






10, 803. 21 




$1, 483. 68 
1, 348. 76 


$3, 910. 00 


5, 393. 68 
1, 348. 76 

4.00 




Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


4.00 
55.00 

753. 11 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






55.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








753. 11 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,119 


61, 782. 82 


2,832.44 


4, 722. 11 


18, 357. 76 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










4, 860. 58 












1,296.78 












14.20 














Total 










6,171.56 















BOZEMAN, MONT. 





8 
42 
13 

8 

12 

128 

61 

64 


474. 81 

5,205.57 

479. 03 

800. 21 

41.84 

19, 182. 29 
[8, 618. 50] 

[8, 440. 81] 






$693. 51 








13, 013. 96 








2, 372. 50 
16, 004. 20 

98.23 








Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 






Original entries under the desert land act . 






4, 795. 59 






8, 618. 50 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






14, 258. 24 










Total cash sales 


336 
480 
238 

1 


26, 183. 75 

69,848.29 

[36, 210. 04] 

[159. 08] 






59, 854. 73 


Original homestead entries 


$5, 049. 48 
2, 656. 37 


$4, 460. 00 


9, 509. 48 




2, 656. 37 
4.00 


Final entries under the timber-culture laws. 


4.00 


Final commissions on commuted home- 


551.07 


551.07 


Lands selected under grants to railroads... 

Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 


47 

16 

42 
3 

65 


7, 494. 08 


94.00 
160. 00 

420. 00 
30.00 

195. 00 
28.00 

603. 17 


94.00 




160.00 






420. 00 


Mineral protests, adverse claims 






30.00 


Coal land declaratory statements 






195. 00 








28.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








603. 17 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,228 


103, 526. 12 


8, 256. 92 


5, 994. 17 


74, 105. 82 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










2,812.08 














Total 










8, 812. 08 















REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 253 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

GREAT FALLS, MONT. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




39 
10 

87 
603 
377 

123 


2, 938. 78 
955. 03 

447. 29 
116,717.25 

[67, 677. 48] 

[18, 648. 70] 






$3, 923. 49 








2, 387. 57 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






557. 45 


Original entries under the desert land act . 






29, 152. 49 






67, 677. 48 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






23, 342. 68 








1.00 
















1,239 

835 

348 

65 

1 

10 

1 
12 
5 


121,058.35 

121,225.45 

[49, 900. 48] 

10, 121. 05 






127,042.16 




$4, 638. 41 
1,878.79 


$7, 860. 00 


12, 498. 41 




1, 878. 79 




130. 00 
10.00 

100. 00 

3.00 
36.00 
15.00 
60.00 

895.84 


130. 00 


Application to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 




10.00 






100. 00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






3.00 








36.00 








15.00 








60.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








895. 84 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,516 


252, 404. 85 


6,517.20 


9, 109. 84 


142, 669. 20 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








6, 000. 00 










4, 359. 01 












Total 






i 


10, 359. 01 








1 





HELENA, MONT. 





14 
16 
119 

16 
169 
106 

24 


1, 520. 18 
1,764.49 
4,959.57 

59.76 
31,046.44 
[24, 371. 06] 

ra. 7i 7. Qoi 






$2, 519. 50 








4,411.23 
18,912.50 

102. 38 








Excess payments on homestead, timber- 












7, 759. 63 


Final entries under the desert-land act 






24, 371. 06 
5, 794. 83 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 














Total cash sales 


464 

197 

94 

4 
58 
17 
116 
12 

16 
10 


39, 350. 44 

. 27,999.39 

[13,340.97] 

[412. 92] 
8, 925. 56 
2, 711. 78 






63, 871. 13 
3, 503. 14 


Original homestead entries 


$1, 683. 14 
794. 81 


«1, 820. 00 


Final homestead entries 


794. 81 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


16.00 

116.00 

34.00 

1,160.00 

36.00 

160.00 
100. 00 
14.00 

198. 92 


16.00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 




116. 00 






34.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




1, 160. 00 


Applications to purchase coal lands 






36.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 






160. 00 


Mineral protests, adverse claims 






100. 00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






14.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








198. 92 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


988 


78, 987. 17 


2, 477. 95 


3, 654. 92 


70, 004. 00 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










3, 068. 16 














Total 










9, 068. 16 















254 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
KALISPELL, MONT. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




149 

8 

16 

2 
6 

60 


20, 584. 20 
247. 32 

72.27 
240. 00 
[740. 97] 

[8, 704. 75] 






$51,470.47 
943. 54 








Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations.. 






143. 26 


Original entries under the desert-land act. . 






60.00 






740. 97 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






10, 880. 91 










241 
153 

62 
135 

10 

148 
1 


21,143.79 
21, 157. 52 
[8, 986. 73] 
21, 375. 34 






64,239.15 

2, 377. 90 

423. 51 


Original homestead entries 


$992. 90 
423. 51 


$1, 385. 00 


Final homestead entries 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 

Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 


270. 00 
100. 00 

1, 480. 00 

3.00 

38.00 

777.27 


270. 00 




100. 00 






1, 480. 00 


Reservoir declaratory statements 




1 


3.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






38.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








777.27 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


750 


63, 676. 65 


1, 416. 41 


4, 053. 27 


69, 708. 83 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6,000.00 
1, 353. 44 
























Total 










7, 353. 44 













LEWISTOWN, MONT. 





60 

29 

8 

4 

[9] 

23 

288 
169 

71 


3. 389. 90 






$4, 935. 24 
6 809.37 




2, 723. 75 
223. 37 
240. 00 

[1, 000. 00] 
/ 
66.91 








1,130.00 








2, 400. 00 
558. 00 


Sales of abandoned military reservations, 
payments thereon, and interest on de- 
ferred payments 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






87.40 


Original entries under the desert-land act. . 


44, 139. 76 
[28, 216. 79] 

[10, 727. 98] 






11, 035. 01 






28, 216. 79 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






13, 759. 98 











Total cash sales 


652 
336 
101 

1 

1 
4 
15 

29 
4 
32 


50, 783. 69 

49,095.36 

[13, 969. 02] 

[160. 00] 

120.00 
636. 72 






68, 931. 79 


Original homestead entries 


$i, 937. 6i 
559. 80 


$3, 160. 00 


5, 097. 01 




559. 80 


Final entrv under thetimber-culture laws . . 


4.00 

3.00 

8.00 

150.00 

290. 00 
40.00 
96.00 
15.00 

1, 687. 36 


4.00 


Lands entered with military bounty land 




3.00 






8.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




150.00 






290. 00 


Mineral protests, adverse claims 






40.00 


Coal land declaratorv statements 






96.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices. . 






15.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1, 687. 36 











Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,175 


100,635.77 


2, 496. 81 


5,453.36 


76, 881. 96 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6,000.00 












2, 219. 60 












22.50 














Total 










8, 242. 10 















EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 255 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

MILES CITY, MONT. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




2 
5 

37 

205 

15 

7 


91.84 
640. 88 

173. 36 
38, 379. 04 
[2, 396. 25] 

[1,040.00] 






$114. 80 








1, 602. 20 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






277. 48 


Original entries under the desert-land act. . 






9, 594. 79 






2, 396. 25 
1, 600. 00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 
















271 

335 

40 

1 

1,507 

5 

11 


39, 285. 12 

51, 687. 57 

[6, 168. 19] 

[120. 00] 

240, 719. 34 






15, 585. 52 




$2, 876. 77 
354. 68 


$3, 278. 00 


6, 154. 77 
354. 68 






4.00 
3, 014. 00 

50.00 

33.00 

24.00 

1.00 

93.07 


4.00 






3, 014. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 




50.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






33.00 




8 






24.00 








1.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








93.07 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,178 


331, 692. 03 


3, 231. 45 


6, 497. 07 


25, 314. 04 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 

1, 200. 02 

5.55 






























Total 










7, 205. 57 













MISSOULA, MONT. 



Sales of land at piiblic auction 


5 

56 

87 
15 

13 
30 
45 

11 


237. 87 

7, 463. 20 

12,000.54 

979. 42 

108. 28 
6, 724. 93 
[8, 965. 96] 

[1,638.59] 






$297. 34 


Sales of land by preemption entrv 






9, 529. 02 








30, 001. 35 
3,680.00 

207. 16 








Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations.. 






Original entries under the desert-land act. . 





1,681.23 


Final entries under the desert-land act 




8, 965. 96 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 




3, 047. 77 











262 

156 

91 

442 

16 

17 

87 
59 


27, 514. 24 
21, 868. 80 
[13,403.28] 
70, 227. 80 
2, 461. 20 






57, 409. 83 

2, 824. 60 

720. 58 




$1, 394. 60 
720. 58 


$1, 430. 00 


Final homestead entries 


Lands selected under grants to railroads.. . 


884. 00 
32. 00 
170.00 

870. 00 
177. 00 
18.00 

752. 83 


884. 00 


State selections 




32.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




170. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 






870. 00 


Preemption declaratory statements 






177. 00 








18.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








752. 83 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,130 


122, 072. 04 


2, 115. 18 


4, 333. 83 


63, 858. 84 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










3, 030. 81 


Expense of depositing public moneys 










66.40 














Total 










9, 097. 21 














Receipts from sales of Flathead Indian 
lands (Bitter Root Valley): 
Payments subsequent to first payments. 
Interest payments 


[4] 


[480.00] 






2,005.32 






47.63 














Total 


[4] 


[480. 00] 






2, 052. 95 











256 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
ALLIANCE, NEBR. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Sales of land at public auction 


14 
1 


960. 41 
97.20 






$1,295.52 
243. 00 


Sale of timber and stone lands 






Sales of abandoned military reservations, 






542. 54 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 


59. 

57 


192. 20 
[8, 884. 44] 






240.28 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






11, 105. 55 








Total cash sales 


131 
846 
144 

14 

1 
52 


1,249.81 
170, 593. 10 
[21,971.98] 

[2, 240. 00] 






13, 426. 89 




$3, 280. 69 
549. 29 


$8, 290. 00 


11 570 69 




549 29 


Final entries under the timber -culture 
laws 


56.00 

10.00 

104. 00 

4.00 

55.00 

709. 97 


56.00 


Application to purchase timber and stone 




10.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






104. 00 


Reservoir declaratory statements 






4.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices. . 








55.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






709. 97 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,190 


171, 842. 91 


3, 829. 98 


9, 228. 97 


26, 485. 84 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










5,991.18 

1, 584. 66 

15.40 


































Total 








7, 591. 24 








1 





BROKEN BOW, NEBR. 



Sales of land at public auction 


8 
68 
49 


319. 64 
390. 51 

[7,321.24] 






$401. 55 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






488. 15 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






9, 151. 55 








Total cash sales 


125 
788 
94 

5 

15 
1 


710. 15 
284,769.87 
[14,522.78] 

[800. 00] 






10, 041. 25 


Original homestead entries 


$3, 063. 92 
363. 07 


$7,745.00 


10, 808. 92 


Final homestead entries 


363. 07 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


20.00 

30.00 

2.00 

38.00 

664. 98 


20.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 




30.00 








2.00 








38.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








664. 98 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,028 


285,480.02 


3, 426. 99 


8, 499. 98 


21, 968. 22 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








5, 382. 74 


Incidental expenses 









1, 294. 84 













Total 










6, 677. 58 















LINCOLN, NEBR. 





3 
6 
2 
7 


73.69 

43.88 

[79. 20] 

[720. 30] 






$102. 48 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






99.34 


Sales of land under act Mar. 3, 1887 (24 
Stats., 556) .... 








Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S... 






950. 75 












18 

48 
27 

2 


117. 57 
5, 117. 43 
[2, 630. 62] 

[240. 00] 






1, 152. 57 


Original homestead entries 


$143. 37 
74. 85 


$370. 00 


513. 37 


Final homestead entries 


74.85 


Final entries under the timber-culture 
laws 


8.00 


8.00 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 257 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
LINCOLN, NEBR.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








$163. 51 


$163. 51 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


95 


5, 235. 00 


$218. 22 


511.51 


1, 912. 30 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










1, 453. 25 












3.12 














Total 










1, 456. 37 














Cash sale, Otoe and Missouria Indian lands: 


1 


40.00 






2, 022. 80 











McCOOK, NEBR. 





18 
15 
9 


1,480.00 

119. 40 

[1,235.21] 






$1,901.00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. 






149. 26 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






1, 544. 01 












42 

284 
61 

23 

3 


1, 599. 40 
67, 634. 09 
[8, 693. 08] 

[3, 676. 62] 






3, 594. 27 
3, 743. 04 




$1, 048. 04 
224. 96 


$2, 695. 00 




224.96 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


92.00 

6.00 
46.00 

509. 85 


92.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 




6.00 








46.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








509.85 













Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


413 


69, 233. 49 


1, 273. 00 


3, 348, 85 


8,216.12 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










2, 998. 74 












352. 00 












4.40 














Total 










3, 355. 14 













NORTH PLATTE, NEBR. 





16 

7 

43 

1 

10 


916. 57 

[780. 76] 

87.26 

[160. 00] 

[1,081.00] 






$1,421.57 
2, 562. 13 








Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. 






156. 38 


Timber-culture entry commuted under act 
Mar. 3. 1891 




200. 00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 


i 


1, 751. 25 




! 






77 
595 
115 

8 
3 


1,003.83 
162, 803. 70 
[17,891.89] 

[1,280.00] 




6,091.33 
8, 942. 78 


Original homestead entries 


$3, i22. 78 JB5. 820. Of) 


Final homestead entries 


749. 72 




749. 72 


Final entries under the timber-culture 




32.00 

6.00 

48.00 

470. 01 


32.00 






6.00 








48.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








470. 01 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


798 


163, 807. 53 


3,872.50 


6,376.01 


16, 339. 84 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










5, 550. 32 












855. 97 












13.35 














Total 










6,419.64 
















8970—04- 



■17 



258 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

O'NEILL, NEBR. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




18 
25 
47 
99 


982. 31 

[3, 681. 83] 

172. 19 

[11, 485. 76] 






$1,353.89 

6, 154. 96 

215. 32 


Sales of abandoned military reservations 
( Fort Randall ) 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






13, 519. 86 








Total cash sales 


189 
761 
118 

7 

17 
60 


1, 154. 50 

187, 850. 15 

[16, 796. 16] 

[1, 117. 40] 

1, 380. 95 

[8, 560. 37] 






21,244.03 




$2,777.13 
420. 04 


$7, 125. 00 


9, 902. 13 
420 04 






28.00 
105. 00 


28 00 


Original homestead entries (Ponca Indian 


34.00 

214. 02 

95. 16 


139 00 


Final homestead entries (Ponca Indian 


214. 02 


Commissions on commuted homesteads, 




95. 16 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 


15 




30.00 
31.00 

1, 101. 78 


30.00 








31.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1,101.78 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,167 


190, 385. 60 


3, 540. 35 


8,420.78 


33, 205. 16 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 












1,607.46 












29. 80 














Total 










7, 637. 26 














Receipts from sales of Indian lands: 

Ponca Sioux Indian lands, commuted 


36 


T3. 566. 771 






2, 789. 35 










Omaha Indian lands: 


3 

2 
[25] 


160. 30 

200. 00 

T2. 948. 611 






1, 764. 20 








933. 34 


Payments subsequent to first payment. 
Interest pavments 






12, 264. 01 


i 






2, 308. 11 












Total 


{ [ 'f 


[2, 948. 61] 
360. 30 


1 




17, 269. 66 




J 







SIDNEY, NEBR. 



Excess payments on homestead, timber- 


24 


50. 12 
[1,200.00] 






$85. 17 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 23 1, R. S 8 






1, 500. 00 












32 


50. 12 






1, 585. 17 


Original homestead entries i 603 

Final homestead entries 58 


204, 126. 50 
[8. 746. 05] 
[1,591.59] 


$2, 758. 06 
310. 68 


$5,975.00 


8, 733. 06 
310. 68 


40.00 
10.00 

207. 62 


40.00 




5 




10.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






207. 62 


Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 










708 


204, 176. 62 


3, 068. 74 


6, 232. 62 


10, 886. 53 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










4, 357. 09 












460. 58 












7.10 














Total 










4, 824. 77 















REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 259 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

VALENTINE, NEBR. 



Class of entry. | ^um- 


Acres. 


Commis- - 
sions. * ees * 


Amount. 




15 
1 

47 
91 


1,042.71 

720. 00 

170. 18 

[14, 016. 76] 






SI, 363. 40 


Sale of land under act May 31, 1902 (32 
Stats 283) 






1, 440. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






212. 87 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301 R. S 






17, 520. 96 












154 

784 
141 

7 

100 


1,932.89 

226, 436. 77 

[20, 970. 21] 

[948. 85] 






20, 537. 23 




$3, 032. 75 
524. 41 


$7, 660. 00 


10, 692. 75 




524. 41 




28.00 

200. 00 
52.00 

899. 40 


28.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 




200. 00 








52.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








899. 40 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,186 


228, 369. 66 


3, 557. 16 


8, 839. 40 


32, 933. 79 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 











1,549.20 










24.42 












Total 










7, 573. 62 















CARSON CITY, NEV. 





3 

61 

13 
11 

1 

5 


240. 00 

2,581.87 

30.88 

2, 360. 94 

[320. 00] 

[798. 70] 






$600. 00 








12,952.50 
44.93 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 






Original entries under the desert-land act.. 






590. 25 








320. 00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






998. 40 












94 

162 

2 

1,168 

48 

3 
2 
2 


5, 213. 69 

24, 589. 13 

[316. 61] 

186, 665. 24 






15, 506. 08 




$1, 303. 35 
18.00 


81, 570. 00 


2, 873. 35 




18.00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads... 


2, 336. 00 
480. 00 

30.00 

20.00 

6.00 

160. 90 


2, 336. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




480. 00 






30.00 








20. 00 








6.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






160. 90 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,481 


216, 468. 06 


1,321.35 


4,602.90 


21,430.33 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










5,664.26 
6.96 


Incidental expenses 




















57. 10 














Total 










5, 728. 32 















CLAYTON, 


N. MEX. 








Sales of land at public auction 


1 

58 

48 

2 

37 


40.00 

169. 69 

9,116.81 

[400. 00] 

[5, 786. 94] 




$50. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. 




212. 14 


Original entries under the desert-laud act. 




2, 279. 20 


Final enterics under the desert-land act... 




400. 00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






7, 223. 67 










Total cash sales 


146 

713 

199 

89 

1 


9, 326. 50 
112, 388. 04 






10, 165. 01 


Original homestead entries 


S4.214.07 


$7,065.00 


11,279.07 


Final homestead entries 


[31,449.76] 1.179.42 


1, 179. 42 


State selections 


20, 791. 12 




178. 00 
3.00 


178. 00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 




3.00 



260 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
CLAYTON, N. MEX.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




1 






$3.00 

1.00 

533. 77 


$3.00 








1.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








533. 77 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,149 


142, 505. 66 


$5, 393. 49 


7, 783. 77 


23, 342. 27 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 












1, 549. 92 












Total 










7, 549. 92 




1 









LAS CRUCES, N. MEX. 





11 
1 

23 
24 

1 

7 


459. 80 
40.00 

91.77 

3, 000. 00 

[80. 00] 

T960. 001 






$2, 330. 00 
800. 00 








Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. 






114. 65 


Original entries under the desert-land act. 






750. 00 


Final entrv under the desert-land act 






80.00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






1, 200. 00 












Total cash sales 


67 

237 

69 

1 
211 
8 
1 
33 
1 
1 


3, 591. 57 
34, 663. 19 
[9, 548. 96] 

40.00 
33,712.20 






5, 274. 65 




$1, 300. 02 
358. 18 


$2,215.00 


3, 515. 02 
358. 18 




Lands entered with Sioux half-breed scrip, 
act July 17, 1854 






State selections 




422. 00 

80.00 

10.00 

99.00 

1.00 

3.00 

178. 19 


422. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




80.00 






10.00 








99.00 








1.00 








3.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






178. 19 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


629 


72, 006. 96 


1, 658. 20 


3,008.19 


9, 941. 04 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










3, 556. 82 












553. 53 


Expense of depositing public moneys 










1.25 














Total 










4,111.60 















ROSWELL, N. MEX. 



Sales of mineral lands 


2 

63 

309 

21 

70 


40.32 

167. 94 

57, 250. 27 
[4,470.70] 

[10, 528. 05] 






$205. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations . 






209. 99 


Original entries under the desert-land act. 






14, 312. 60 
4, 470. 70 


Final entries under the desert-land act 






Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






13,160.06 








Total cash sales 


465 

876 

58 

486 

2 

49 
23 


57, 458. 53 

133, 276. 02 

[7,774.91] 

77, 171. 33 






32, 358. 35 


Original homestead entries 


$4, 997. 83 
291. 56 


$8,425.00 


13, 422. 83 




291. 56 




972. 00 
20.00 

147.00 
69.00 
47.00 

740. 95 


972. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




20.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






147. 00 


Coal-land declaratory statements 






69.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






47.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








740. 95 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,959 


267, 905. 88 


5, 289. 39 


10,420.95 


48, 068. 69 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6,000.00 

1, 352. 56 

3.55 












Expense of depositing public moneys 






















Total i 










7, 356. 11 















REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 261 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

SANTA FE, N. MEX. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




2 
1 

16 
6 

39 
25 
15 

17 


125.95 

160. 00 
468. 48 
520. 00 

146. 16 
3, 466. 29 
[2, 481. 98] 

[2,365.43] 






$157. 44 








200. 00 








2, 022. 50 








8, 000. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






186. 46 


Original entries under the desert-land act. 






866. 56 






2, 481. 98 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 






2, 956. 79 












121 
389 


4, 886. 88 
58, 853. 52 
[31,076.47] 
54, 754. 10 

447. 93 






16,871.73 




$2, 349. 72 
1,177.45 


$3, 745. 00 


6, 094. 72 




203 


1,177.45 




37 

8 

18 

4 


74.00 


74. 00 


Small holdings (acts Mar. 3, 1891, and Feb. 
21,1893) 

Applications to purchase mineral lands 








180.00 
40.00 


180. 00 






40.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


3 
137 

1 






9.00 

411.00 

3.00 

3.00 

649. 15 


9.00 








411.00 








3.00 








3.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








649. 15 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


921 


118, 942. 43 


3,527.17 | 5,114.15 


25, 513. 05 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 








2,462.84 










Total 








8, 462. 84 













BISMARCK, N. DAK. 



Sales of land at public auction 


144 

2 

265 
2 

544 


9, 568. 34 






$19, 412. 64 


Sales of abandoned military reservations, 
commuted homesteads, and partial pay- 
ments 


[1, 305. 65] 

948. 43 
360. 00 

[84, 526. 20] 








2, 184. 64 
1, 965. 36 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Original entries under the desert-land act . 

Homestead entries commuted to cash under 

section 2301, R. S 






90.00 






128, 804. 25 


Competitive bids 






31.25 










Total cash sales 


957 
4,150 


10, 876. 77 
630, 343. 67 






152, 488. 14 




SS9.7 974 45 


$40, 105. 00 
44. 66 


67, 379. 45 

5, 346. 80 

44.00 




818 

11 

901 

13 

1 
465 


[125, 349. 96] 5. 346 80 


Final entries under the timber-culture laws. 


[1, 760. 00] 
143, 474. 05 




Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 




1.802.00 
26.00 


1, 802. 00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declaratory 
statements 




26.00 








2.00 
930. 00 
666. 00 

1,536.56 


2.00 








930. 00 


Amount received for cancellation notices . 






636. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1, 536. 56 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


7,316 


784, 694. 49 


32, 621. 25 


45,111.56 


230, 220. 95 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 












7, 337. 39 
81.75 


Expense of depositing public moneys 























Total 








13,419.14 















262 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

DEVILS LAKE, N. DAK. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. ' Amount. 


Sales of land at public auction 


49 
2 
1 

109 
1 

1,820 


2, 200. 94 

320. 00 

40.00 

656. 43 
40.00 

[257, 342. 84] 






$2, 863. 41 
800. 00 
800. 00 

820. 25 
10.00 

321,655.20 
15.00 


Sales of timber and stone lands 












Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations . 







Original entries under the desert-land act. 






Homestead entries commuted to cash under 
section 2301, R. S 
























1, 982 
1,365 
1,680 

7 
37 

2 
6 


3, 257. 37 

160,925.32 

[241, 402. 73] 

[1, 040. 00] 

5, 703. 30 






326, 963. 86 
15, 088. 37 




$4, 023. 37 
6, 035. 37 


$11,065.00 


Final homestead entries 


6, 035. 37 
28.00 


Final entries under the timber-culture laws. 


28.00 
74.00 

20.00 

12.00 

207. 00 

3, 654. 42 


State selections 




74.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 




20.00 








12.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices . 








207. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 









3, 654. 42 




5,079 








Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


169, 885. 99 


10, 058. 74 


15,060.42 


352, 083, 02 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 

4, 815. 63 

237. 40 


































Total 










11, 053. 03 















FARGO, N. DAK. 



Sales of land at public auction 


27 

11 

131 


1, 152. 12 

44.00 

[17, 901. 28] 




$2,097,40 
75.15 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 




Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 




28, 781. 46 








Total cash sales 


169 
234 
354 

8 


1, 196. 12 
30, 983, 23 
[52, 390. 34] 

[1,005.55] 






30, 954. 01 


Original homestead entries 


$1, 270. 35 
2, 222. 79 


$2,060.00 


3, 330. 35 


Final homestead entries 


2, 222. 79 
32.00 


Final entries under the timber-culture laws 


32.00 


Final commissions on commuted Indian 
ceded lands 


23.41 


23.41 








54.00 
841. 54 


54.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








841. 54 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


765 


32,179.35 


3, 516. 55 


2,987.54 


37, 458, 10 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










1,094.42 














Total 








7, 094. 42 











GRAND FORKS, N. DAK. 





14 
2 

7 

176 


751. 01 
200. 00 


1 


$1, 175. 21 




..! 


500. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 


81.32 
[22, 884. 13] 




101. 66 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






28, 605. 18 












199 
108 
560 

8 

2 


1,032.33 






30, 382. 05 




12,089.29 

[84,341.49] 

[1, 120. 00] 


$303. 79 
2, 108. 68 


$855. 00 


1,158.79 




2, 108. 68 




32.00 
20.00 


32.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




20.00 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 263 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
GRAND FORKS, N. DAK.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. Amount. 










$6.00 $6.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








819. 70 819. 70 




877 








Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


13, L21. 62 


$2, 412. 47 


1,732.70 


34, 527. 22 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










4, 897. 76 












1,599.97 












12.65 












Total 








6,510.38 






1 





MINOT, N. DAK. 





9 


480. 43 






$873. 30 


Sales of coal lands 


11 423.80 
309 946. 02 






8, 476. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






1, 181. 67 


Original entries under the desert-land act. 


59 
3 


8, 685. 35 






2, 171. 34 


T44 1.041 






441. 04 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 


2,543 [392,639.15] 






490, 798. 77 




26. 00 














2,934 10,535.60 
5,150 788,134.90 

305 i [42,757.86] 

i n <;o. ooi 






503, 968. 12 
69, 650. GO 




$19, 705. 60 
1,063.83 


$49, 945. 00 




1,063.83 




4.00 

68.00 

358. 00 

16.00 

347. 00 

4, 453. 52 


4.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


34 

179 

8 






68.00 








358. 00 








16.00 








347. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








4, 453. 52 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


8,611 


798, 670. 50 


20, 769. 43 


55,191.52 


579, 929. 07 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 












7,231.34 











Total 




■ 


13, 231. 34 












ALVA, OKLA. 



Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 


104 


[14, 445. 95] 






$15, 398. 47 








1, 571. 66 














Total cash sales 


104 
403 

541 


[14,445.95] 
50, 957. 37 
[83, 365. 57] 






16, 970. 13 




$1, 284. 01 
2, 084. 24 

376. 77 


$3, 440. 00 


4, 724. 01 


Final homestead entries 


2, 084. 24 


Commissions on commuted homesteads 
(Indian ceded lands) 




376. 77 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 


2 




4.00 
65.00 

1,842.34 


4.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






65. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1,842.34 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,050 


50, 957. 37 


3, 745. 02 


5, 351. 34 


26, 066. 49 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










1,919.62 













39.37 














Total 










7,958.99 















264 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

ELRENO, OKLA. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


AC-. | C °£ST 


Fees. 


Amount. 




1, 412 


[208, 065. 48] 






$263, 490. 25 










Total cash sales 


1, 412 
460 

781 


[208, 065. 48] 

61 , 656. 46 

[122, 424. 61] 






263, 490. 25 




$1, 541. 31 
3,060.67 

409. 09 


#4,040.00 


5, 581. 31 




3,060.67 
409.09 


Final commissions on commuted home- 
steads (Indian lands) 




Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


3 






6. 00 
87.00 

3, 609. 83 


6.00 






87.00 


Amount received tor reducing testimony 
to writing 






3, 609. 83 






i 




Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,656 


61,656.46 


5, 011. 07 


7, 742. 83 


276, 244. 15 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








6, 000. 00 










5, 592. 57 


Expense of depositing public moneys 








159. 40 












Total 




I 




11,751.97 













GUTHRIE, OKLA. 



Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 


37 


[4,386.36] 






$7, 112. 33 








375. 77 
















37 

53 

444 


[4, 386. 36] 
5,086.44 

[59, 987. 14] 






7,488.10 
492. 87 




$127. 87 

1,498.38 

171. 25 


$365. 00 




1 498.38 




'"U.QQ 
1, 383. 16 


171.25 








12.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 









1,383.16 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


534 


5,086.44 


1, 797. 50 


1,760.16 


11,045.76 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










4, 152. 16 


Incidental expenses 










2,321.74 










2.20 














Total 










6,476. 10 















KINGFISHER, OKLA. 



Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 


169 


[20,595.80] 






$31,192.47 


Interest payments 






544. 88 














Total cash sales 


169 
998 
929 


[20, 595. 80] 
134, 957. 94 
[143, 920. 59] 






31, 737. 35 


Original homestead entries 


$3,374.94 
3, 599. 41 

786. 70 


$8, 910. 00 


12,281.94 




3, 599. 41 


Commissions on commuted homesteads 
(Indian ceded lands) 




786. 70 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 


8 




16.00 
157. 00 

1, 447. 99 


16.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices. . 






157. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1, 447. 99 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,104 


134, 957. 94 


7,761.05 


10, 530. 99 


50, 029. 39 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 












3, 943. 43 
40.65 
























Total 










9, 984. 08 















REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 265 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

LAWTON, OKLA. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


\,ivs ! Commis- 
A< us - sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Homestead entries commuted to fash un- 
der section 2301 R. S 


1, 653 


[249, 550. 95] 




§311.938.92 












1,653 
380 

2 


[249, 550. 95] 

51.457.15 $1,286.46 


"$3~345."66' 

4.00 
54.00 

2, 369. 67 


311,93.s.92 




4,631.46 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


4.00 







54 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






2, 369. 67 








Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,035 


51,457.15 1,286.46 


5, 772. 67 


318, 998. 05 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








6, 000. 00 










5, 454. 78 
221. 05 




















Total 








11,675.83 











MANGUM, OKLA. 



Excess payments on homestead, timber- 


17 
12 


124. 67 

24. 00 

f [11,116.93] 
\ 160. 00 






$155. 84 


Sales of school and parsonage sites under 
act Jan. 18, 1897 (29 Stats., 490) 






2.50 


Amount of payments on Greer County 
lands, sold underact Jan., 1897 (29 Stats., 
490) 


I 




4, 008. 08 


J 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 


368 I [49,057.17] 


65,951.97 











39* 308. 67 
982 133,756.39 




70, 118. 39 
12, 144. 42 




«3. 344. 4"> 


$8, 800. 00 




992 1 [156,952.10] 3.923.90 


3, 923. 90 


Commissions on commuted homesteads 




555. 64 




555. 64 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


5 






10.00 
220. 00 

1,538.60 


10.00 








220. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






1, 538. 60 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2, 377 


134,065.06 


7,823.96 


10, 568. 60 


88, 510. 95 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 








6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 











2, 530. 74 












77.05 














Total 










8, 607. 79 













OKLAHOMA, OKLA. 
[Note.— Office discontinued Mar. 31, 1904, by Executive order dated Jan. 15, 1904.] 



Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 


18 


[2,075.88] 






$2, 943. 27 










Total cash sales 


18 
47 
106 


[2, 075. 88] 

3, 502. 82 

[11,903.48] 






2, 943. 27 




$87. 62 
297. 65 

49.77 


$280.00 


367. 62 


Final homestead entries 


297. 65 


Commissions on commuted homesteads 
(Indian ceded lands) 




49.77 


Amount received for cancellation notices. . 






4.00 
131.87 


4.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








131.87 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


171 


3, 502. 82 


435. 04 


415. 87 


3, 794. 18 



266 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
OKLAHOMA, OKLA.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










$1,543.53 











959. 48 












Total 








2, 503. 01 










Cash sales, "Absentee Shawnee Indian 
school lands" (under act Mar. 3. 1903): 


2 319.50 






10, 680. 00 















WOODWARD, OKLA. 



Sales of land at public auction 


1 

263 
1 

575 


40.00 
399. 53 






$50. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations.. 






488. 4ft 








2.00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 


[84, 365. 10] 






88,601.37 








6, 043. 40 














840 

6,171 

309 


439. 53 
951,785.29 






95, 185. 23 




$23, 798. 09 


$60,210.00 


84, 008. 09 


Final homestead entries 


[48, 047. 12J 


1,201.25 

1,357.68 


1,201.25 


Commissions on commuted homesteads 




1, 357. 68 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


477 




954. 00 
158.00 

1, 153. 40 


954. 00 








158. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1,153.40 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


7,797 


952,224.82 


26,357.02 


62,475.40 


184, 017. 65 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 








6, 000. 00 










7, 591. 24 










70.90 












Total 








13, 662. 14 













BURNS, OREG. 



Sales of land at public auction 


2 

20 

3 

11 

56 
32 

19 


240.00 




$312. 00 

6,388.83 

379. 75 

53.23 


2, 555. 53 




Sales of mineral lands 


151.90 




Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations . 


42.57 




Original entries under the desert-land act. . 


9,054.41 . 




2, 263. 61 


[4, 224. 77] L . 




4, 224. 77 
3, 606. 99 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 


[2,885.59] 














143 

195 

50 

130 

20 

15 

1 


12,044.41 . 




17, 229. 18 
2, 889. 05 


Original homestead entries 


28,382.15 1 $1,064.05 
[7, 142. 47] 267. 80 
20, 627. 51 


$1, 825. 00 




267. 80 




260. 00 
30.00 

200. 00 

45.00 

3.00 

149. 00 


260. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




30.00 




'200. 00 


Coal-land declaratory statements 




45.00 


Reservoir declaratory statement 


:::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


3.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 




149. 00 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


557 


61,054.07 1,331.85 


2, 512. 00 


21,073.03 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








3, 363. 32 

271. 20 

.40 



























Total 




| 




3, 634. 92 




I" 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 267 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

LA GRANDE, OREG. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




15 

704 

16 

1 

48 
36 
4 

122 


1, 683. 35 

103, 970. 99 

878. 86 

160. 00 

225. 22 
6,121.01 

[440. 00] 

[18, 504. 27] 






$2, 294. 19' 
259, 927. 75 














3, 762. 50 








1,600.00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






322. 87 


Original entries under the desert-land act. 






1, 530. 27 






440. OCT 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






23, 130. 34 












946 
593 
169 

1 

3 
1 

28 

704 

7 

1 
24 


113,039.43 
88,681.49 
[25, 458. 31] 

[160. 00] 

400. 00 

80.00 






293, 007. 92 




$3, 536. 32 
959. 04 


$5, 645. 00 


9, 181. 32 




959. 04 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


4.00 

6.00 

2.00 

280. 00 

7, 040. 00 
70.00 

3.00 
72.00 
16.00 

1,000.31 


4. 00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads... 




6.00- 




2.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands....' 
Applications to purchase timber and stone 




280. 00 






7, 040. 00 








70. 00' 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






3.00 








72.00 








16.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1, 000. 31 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,477 


202, 200. 92 


4, 495. 36 


14, 138. 31 


311,641.59 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










3,864.89 


Expense of depositing public monevs 










625. 10> 














Total 










10, 489. 99 














Cash receipts from sales of Umatilla In- 
dian Reservation lands: 
Full pavments 


m 
m 

[383] 


905. 96 

853. 72 

[46, 241. 53] 






1, 142. 43 








361. 78- 


Payments subsequent to first payments. 






25, 017. 39 








Total 


f [383] 
\ 26 


[46, 241. 53] 
1, 759. 68 


1 




26, 521. 60 




J 







LAKEVIEW, OREG. 





2 

10 
717 

29 
17 
11 

49 


80.00 
1, 423. 45 






$800. 00 

1, 780. 44 

284, 564. 17 









Sales of timber and stone lands 


113, 825. 66 

150. 17 
2, 440. 12 






Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. 







187. 73 


Original entries under the desert-land act. 






610. 03 


Final entries under the desert-land act 


[1,839.76] 
[7,574.44] 






1,839.7& 

9, 468. 05 
10.00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






Competitive bid 



















835 

149 

35 

1 
117 
35 

1 

717 


117, 919. 40 
22, 859. 38 


. 




299, 260. 18 

2, 307. 00 

204. 75- 

4.00 


Original homestead entries 


1RS57. 00 


$1,450.00 


Final homstead entries 


[5, 449. 57] ! 204. 75 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


[160. 00] 

18, 568. 84 

5, 394. 01 

160. 00 




4.00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 




234.00 ! 234.00 


State selections 




70.00 70.00 






2.00 2.0G 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




7,170.00 1 7,170.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 




9.00 9.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






330.02 330.02 






1 




Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,890 


164,901.63 1,061.75 9,269.02 


309, 590. 95- 



268 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continuec 1 
LAKEVIEW, OREG.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










$6, 000. 00 
2, 389. 34 




















1,077.77 














Total , 










9,467.11 













OREGON CITY, OREG. 



Sales of land at public auction 


3 

1 

207 

51 

25 


75.27 

160. 00 

28, 816. 85 

311. 75 

[3, 467. 96] 






$94. 10 


Sales of land by preemption entry 






200. 00 








72, 042. 28 
435. 69 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






4, 615. 00 












287 

487 

90 


29, 363. 87 
67, 301. 03 
[12, 603. 03] 






77, 387. 07 




$2, 742. 55 
545. 26 

9.60 


$4, 395. 00 


7, 137. 55 




545. 26 


Commissions on commuted homesteads 
(Siletz lands) 




9.60 


Lands entered under the donation act 


1 

207 

1 


320. 00 


10.00 

2, 070. 00 
3.00 
9.00 

1,416.06 


10. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 




2, 070. 00 


Preemption declaratory statements. 






3.00 






9.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1,416.06 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,073 


96, 984. 90 


3, 297. 41 


7, 903. 06 


88,587.54 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6,000.00 

3, 162. 94 

32.00 


































Total 










9, 194. 94 















ROSEBURG, OREG. 





3 

1,173 

9 

182 

86 


68.37 

171,437.87 
662. 45 

909. 44 

[12, 770. 70] 






$105. 46 








428, 595. 46 








2, 187. 50 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 


i 


1,472.11 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 




18, 062. 78 










1,453 
768 
178 
187 
356 
8 

1,195 
1 

4 

1 


173, 078. 13 

109,257.61 

[24, 3z6. 95] 

29, 646. 23 

56,841.59 






450, 423. 31 




$5, 466. 24 
1,359.08 


$7, 125. 00 


12,591.24 




1 , 359. 08 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 


374. 00 
712. 00 
80.00 

11,950.00 
3.00 

12.00 
3.00 
12.00 

2, 742. 28 


374. 00 




712. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 




80.00 






11,950.00 


Preemption declaratory statements 

Soldiers and sailors' homestead declara- 






3.00 






12. 00 








3.00 








12.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








2, 742. 28 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


4,151 


368, 823. 56 


6,825.32 


23, 013. 28 


480, 261. 91 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 

5, 489. 79 

55.15 


































Total 










11,544.94 















REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 269 

Statement of the business transacted at the heal land offices, etc. — Continued. 

THE DALLES, OREG. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sioners. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




104 

439 

1 

88 
84 
15 

114 


6, 731. 36 

69, 127. 34 

18.44 

519. 70 
11,611.11 

[2, 300. 99] 

[16, 954. 41] 






$9, 844. 62 








172,818.56 








95. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






718. 32 


Original entries under the desert land act.. 






2, 902. 81 






2, 300. 99 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S . 






21,343.02 












845 
848 
222 

1 
353 

1 

439 
16 
1 


88, 007. 95 
126, 026. 96 
[34, 657. 27] 
[160. 00] 
56, 166. 89 






210, 023. 32 




$5, 134. 07 
1, 308. 67 


$8, 035. 00 


13, 169. 07 




1,308.67 




4.00 
706. 00 
10.00 

4, 390. 00 

48.00 

3.00 

50. 00 

1 , 709. 65 


4.00 






706. 00 


Application to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 




10.00 






4, 390. 00 








48.00 








3.00 








50 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1, 709. 65 














Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2,726 


270,201.80 


6,442.74 i 14,955.65 


231,421.71 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








6, 000. 00 










4, 173. 97 










309. 35 












Total 






i 


10, 483. 32 













ABERDEEN, S. DAK. 





99 
33 

121 


6, 854. 82 

145. 59 

[18, 072. 82] 






$9, 078. 64 
182. 01 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture and other entries and locations. . 






Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






22, 591. 03 










Total cash sales 


253 

299 

200 

2 

23 


7, 000. 41 

44, 182. 56 

[30, 754. 50] 

[320. 00] 




31,851.68 




$1, 104. 59 
768. 84 


$2, 835. 00 


3 939.59 




768. 84 


Final entries under the timber-culture laws. 


8.00 
46.00 
23.00 

794. 19 


8.00 






46.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






23.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








794. 19 














Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


777 51,182.97 


1,873.43 3,706.19 


37, 431. 30 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 


| 




4,381.66 


Incidental expenses 







1,524.80 










Total 








5, 906. 46 













270 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

CHAMBERLAIN, S. DAK. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sioners. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




2 

33 

1 

353 


78.36 

[4, 644. 651 

1.13 

[50, 925. 35] 






$97. 95 


Sales of abandoned military reservations, 






5,994.62 
1.41 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Homestead entries commuted to cash under 
section 2301, R. S 






27, 226. 13 
1.00 






















389 
1,847 

28 

411 
95 


79.49 
283, 203. 16 

[4, 225. 44] 

55, 433. 59 
[14, 938. 97] 






33, 321. 11 




$7, 080. 03 
105. 65 

1, 385. 85 

373. 85 

849. 59 


$17, 805. 00 


24, 885. 03 
105. 65 




Original homestead entries (Sioux Indian 


3, 470. 00 


4, 855. 85 


Final homestead entries (Sioux Indian 


373. 85 


Final commissions on commuted home- 
steads (Sioux Indian ceded lands) 




849. 59 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


97 
291 




194.00 

582. 00 
235. 00 

2, 175. 42 


194. 00 








582. 00 








235. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








2, 175. 42 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


3,158 


338, 716. 24 


9,794.97 


24,461.42 


67, 577. 50 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 












3, 351. 17 
23. 20 
























Total 










9, 374. 37 














Cash sales, Sioux Indian Lands: 


238 


33, 942. 79 






28, 546. 68 









HURON, S. DAK. 





14 

7 
265 


708. 46 

53.86 

[39, 949. 17] 






$1, 152. 38 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






67.35 


Homestead entries commuted to cash under 
section 2301, R. S . . . 






31,548.86 










286 
258 
108 

4 

1 
8 


762. 32 
36, 360. 78 
[16, 239. 17] 

[640. 00] 

160. 00 

[1, 277. 66] 






32, 768. 59 




$908. 85 
405. 99 


$2, 350. 00 


3, 258. 85 




405. 99 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


16.00 
10.00 


16.00 


Original homestead entry (Sioux Indian 
lands) 


4.00 
31.95 
24.00 


14.00 


Final homestead entries (Sioux Indian 


31.95 


Commissions on commuted homesteads 




24.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


1 




2.00 
107. 00 

1,179.64 


2.00 








107. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1,179.64 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


666 


37, 283. 10 


1, 374. 79 


3, 664. 64 


37,808.02 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










4,334.81 
1, 601. 00 
























Total 










5, 935. 81 














Cash sales, Sioux Indian lands: 


7 


[960.32] 






740. 24 











REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 271 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

MITCHELL, S. DAK. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




7 
20 


204. 49 
[1,911.42] 






$555. 95 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 


4,260.94 










27 
58 
144 

2 


204. 49 

6, 657. 76 

[20, 419. 25] 

[299. 06] 






4, 816. 89 




$166. 53 
510. 55 


$475. 00 


641. 53 




510. 55 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


8.00 
18.00 

634. 23 


8.00 






18.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








634. 23 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


231 


6,862.25 | 677.08 


1,135.23 


6, 629. 20 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 




! 




2, 433. 48 










1, 545. 20 
1.90 




I 














Total 








3, 980. 58 






1 







PIERRE, S. DAK. 



Sales of land at public auction 


13 

54 
174 


943. 54 

350. 26 

[27, 343. 09] 






$1, 181. 44 
202. 26 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations . 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






19, 844. 59 












241 

1,393 

19 

7 

30 

22 


1, 293. 80 

220, 237. 47 

[3, 002. 91] 

[1,120.00] 

4, 047. 72 

[3, 375. 60] 






21 , 228. 29 




$5,502.81 
75.05 


$13, 830. 00 


19,332.81 
75.05 


Final homestead entries 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


28.00 
260. 00 


28.00 


Original homestead entries (Sioux Indian 
Reservation ) 


103. 61 

84.26 
42.18 


363. 61 


Final homestead entries (Sioux Indian 
Reservation ) 


84.26 


Commissions on commuted homesteads 




42.18 


State selections 


2 

100 
405 


25. 04 


2.00 

200. 00 

810. 00 

27.00 

894. 07 


2.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 




200. 00 








810. 00 








27.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








894. 07 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


2.219 


225,604.03 


5,807.91 


16,051.07 


43, 087. 27 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 








i 


6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










2, 765. 98 












54.76 














Total 










8, 820. 74 














Cash sales of Sioux Indian lands: 

Commuted homesteads 


13 


1, 687. 21 






883. 61 











RAPID CITY, S. DAK. 



Sales of land at public auction 


35 

1 

12 

102 

50 

154 

4 


2, 315. 36 

160. 00 

1, 168. 35 

7, 215. 85 

207. 48 

29, 900. 55 

[800. 00] 






$2, 966. 23 


Sale of land by preemption entry 






200. 00 


Sales of timber and stone lands. 






2, 920. 88 


Sales of mineral lands 






36, 042. 50 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations.. 






259. 44 


Original entries under the desert-land act . 






7,475.19 
800. 00 


Final entries under the desert-land act 







272 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
RAPID CITY, S. DAK.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Sale of land under act Feb. 18, 1903 (32 
Stats., 840) 


1 
19 


40.00 
[2, 985. 14] 






$50 00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 






3 502 88 








60 00 














Total cash sales 


378 
691 
156 

8 

7 
11 


41, 007. 59 
108,596.83 

[24,077.87] 
[1,266.52] 

979. 70 

[1,741.23] 






54,277 12 




12,715.27 
602. 02 


$6. 845. 00 


9, 560. 27 
602 02 




Final entries under the timber-culture laws. 


32.00 
60.00 


32 00 


Original homestead entries (Sioux Indian 


24.50 
43.53 
3.94 


84 50^ 


Final homestead entries (Sioux Indian 


43.53 


Final commissions on commuted home- 
steads ( ^ioux ceded lands) 




3.94 


Lands entered with Sioux half-breed scrip. 


1 

109 

12 

23 

1 

2 


160. 00 






Applications to purchase mineral lands 




1,090.00 

120. 00 

230. 00 

2.00 

4.00 
4.00 
12.00 

660. 57 


1, 090. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 






120. 00 




:. ::;;:::"" 


230 00 


Preemption declaratory statement 




2.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


i 


4.00 




6 




i 


4.00 






12. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






660. 57 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,407 


150, 744. 12 


3, 389. 26 


9,059.57 


66, 725. 95 


Salaries, fees and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 












2, 994. 37 












Total 










8, 994. 37 














Cash sales, Sioux Indian lands: 

Commuted homestead 


1 


[157. 58] 






108. 20 













WATERTOWN, S. DAK. 



Sales of land at public auction 


5 

1 

113 


87.82 

7.60 

[10, 753. 66] 






$309. 20 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






9.50 


Homestead entries commuted to cash 
under section 2301, R. S 






20, 953. 23 










Total cash sales 


119 

136 

290 

6 


95. 42 

12, 710. 72 

[41, 103. 01] 

[848. 30] 






21,271.93 


Original homestead entries 


$497. 13 
1,853.03 


$980. 00 


1,477.13 




1,853.03 
24.00 




24.00 


Commissions on commuted homesteads, 


300. 60 


300. 60 


Preemption declaratory statement 


1 




2.00 
37.00 

964. 70 


2.00 






37.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








964. 70 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


552 


12, 806. 14 


2, 650. 76 


2, 007. 70 


25, 930. 39 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










4, 803. 48 

1, 578. 98 

5.20 


Incidental expenses 






























Total 










6, 387. 66 












Cash sales, Sioux Indian lands: 


1 


1.44 






1.80 








80.00 


Under act Mar. 3, 1863 .. 


1 


40.00 






50.00 










Total 


2 


41.44 






131.80 









REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 273 

Statement of the business transacted at the local la.nd offices, etc. — Continued. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




150 
6 


6,575.42 
720. 00 






$32, 757. 50 








14, 400. 00 


Sales of abandoned military reservations, 






183. 20 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 


9 
23 

8 

• 3 


65. 15 

2, 297. 91 

[940. 61] 

[292. 56] 






81.44 


Original entries under the desert-land act. . 






574. 48 






941. 29 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301 , R. S 






365. 70 










Total cash sales 


199 

89 

146 

1 

1 

618 

135 

33 

192 


9, 658. 48 

13, 408. 85 

[21,540.71] 

[160.00] 

16. 76 

109, 698. 54 






49, 303. 61 

1,388.31 

863. 43 




$528. 31 
863. 43 


$860. 00 






4.00 

2.00 

1,236.00 

1 , 350. 00 


4.00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads... 




2.00 




1, 236. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




1, 350. 00 
330 00 






330. 00 

576. 00 

8.00 

690. 08 








576. 00 








8.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








690. 08 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,414 


132, 782. 63 


1,391.74 5,056.08 


55,751.43 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 






1 


6, 000. 00 
4, 227. 14 


Incidental expenses 






Total 














10, 227. 14 


Sales of Uintah and White River Ute lands. 






8 720. 38 






900. 48 













NORTH YAKIMA, WASH. 



Sale of land at public auction 


1 
76 


34.40 
10, 756. 35 






$68 80 


Sales of timber and stone lands 






26 891 00 


Supplemental payment on mineral lands, 






9 50 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 


26 
97 
5 

21 

1 


92.84 

15, 309. 18 

[800. 06] 

[2, 993. 46] 

6.39 






232 21 


Original entries under the desert-land act. . 






3, 827. 54 
800. 06 


Final entries under the desert-land act 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






7, 283. 65 


Sale of land under act June 4, 1897 (30 
Stats., p. 36) 










Total cash sales 


227 
349 

44 
162 
657 

76 

2 


26, 199. 16 
50, 634. 08 
[6, 370. 13] 
25, 832. 34 
104, 019. 05 






39,121.76 




$3, 799. 15 
480. 00 


$3, 285. 00 


Final homestead entries 


480 00 


Lands selected under grants to railroads... 


324. 00 
1,314.00 

760. 00 

6.00 
30.00 

570. 89 


324 00 


State selections 




1,314.00 

760. 00 
6 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statements 






Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






30 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








570 89 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,517 


206, 684. 63 


4,279.15 6,289.89 


49, 690. 80 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 






: 


6, 000. 00 
1 329 03 


Incidental expenses 








Expense of depositing public monevs 








27. 45 














Total 










7, 356. 48 













8970—04- 



-1S 



274 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

OLYMPIA, WASH. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Sale of land at private entry 


1 

2 

1 

155 

14 

26 


11.29 

64.75 

148 60 

19,478.40 

136. 73 
[3,552.48] 






$45. 16 








155 06 








371 50 








48, 696. 14 
328 38 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301. R. S 






5,556.64 










199 
87 
41 
66 

155 

1 

12 


19,839.77 
11,228.29 
[5, 833. 60] 
10, 558. 54 






55, 152. 88 

1, 488. 89 

373. 57 




$728. 89 
373. 57 


$76(1.00 




Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 


132. 09 

1,550.00 

3.00 

36. CO 

7.00 

1, 042. 86 


132. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 




1,5E0.00 








3.00 


Coal-land declaratory statements 






36. 00 


Amount received for cancellation notices.. 






7.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1,042.86 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


561 


41,626.60 


1,102.46 


3, 530. 86 


59, 786. 20 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










5,976.36 
1,521.00 






















26 50 












Total 










7, 523. 86 













SEATTLE, WASH. 



Sales of land at public auction 


3 

517 

16 

19 

129 
3 


142. 50 

71,587.95 
9.»7. 29 

87.45 

[19,001.39] 


1 


$217. 50 






178, 970. 16 
5, 025. 00 




1 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 




114.13 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301 R. S 





25,444.41 
120. 00 










1 






687 
211 
44 
172 
39 
15 

517 
1 


72,815.19 
28, 739. 27 
[5, 805. 45] 
27, 238. 40 
1,402.80 






209,891.20 
3,181.78 




$1, 256. 78 
246. 15 


$1,925.00 

"'344.' 66' 




246. 15 


Lands selected under grants to railroads. . . 


344. 00 






Applications to purchase mineral lands . . . 
Applications to purchase timber and stone 




150. 00 

5, 170. 00 
10.00 
30.00 
13.00 

1, 926. 07 


150. 00 






5, 170. 00 








10.00 




10 






30. 00 








13.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 






1, 926. 07 










TotaJ of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,696 130,195.66 


1,502.93 


9,568.07 


220, 962. 20 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








6, 000. 00 










3, 566. 63 












Total . . 








9, 566. 63 




i 









SPOKANE, WASH. 





36 
120 

2 

49 
161 


2, 199. 05 

14, 669. 41 

100. 56 

239. 43 






$2, 748. 85 








36, 673. 59 








305. 60 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






482. 29 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S . . 


[22, 874. 62] 







51, 763. 84 










Total cash sales 


368 


17, 208. 45 






- 91, 974. 17 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 275 



Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
SPOKANE, WASH.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- \ p 
sions. , -flees. 


Amount. 




724 

290 

5 

125 

10 

177 

12 

174 
2 

2 


100, 966. 26 

[41, 777. 33] 
[723. 18] 

17,050.26 

[745. 68] 
28,176.43 


$6,220.35 i ffifi.6^0.00 


$12, 840. 35 




2, 779. 32 




2, 779. 32 




20 00 


20 00 


Original homestead entries (Colville In- 


639. 87, 
28.31 


1, 125. 00 


1, 764. 87 


Final homestead entries (Colville Indian 


28.31 




354. 00 
120. 00 

1,740.00 


354. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 




120. 00 






1,740.00 


Mineral protests, adverse claims 

Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






20.00 


20.00 






6.00 
78.00 

1,654.20 


6.00 








78.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1, 654. 20 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,889 


163,401.40 


9, 667. 85 


11,737.20 


113, 379. 22 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










6, 000. 00 
3, 624. 72 


















Total 








9, 624. 72 










Cash sales, Colville Indian Reservation 
lands: 


54 
12 
20 
3 

2 

[5] 


7,695.57 

503. 75 

[2, 592. 53] 

26.78 

[5.92] 

[271. 04] 






19, 238. 95 
2, 517. 50 














3,469.42 
40. 18 














8.88 









206. 56 











91 


f [2,869.49] 
\ 8, 226. 10 


1 


25, 481. 49 




J i 





VANCOUVER, WASH. 



Sales of land at public auction 


3 

308 

1 

40 

27 


160. 00 

41,748.98 

160. 00 

208. 45 

[3, 783. 96] 






$200. 00 








104, 369. 9S 
1,600.00 








Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






315. 39 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






5, 214. 20 










Total cash sales 


379 

379 

69 

56 

57 
4 

308 

1 
18 


42, 277. 43 

54, 177. 14 

[9, 837. 64] 

8, 689. 59 

9, 067. 20 

493. 00 






111,699.57 


Original homestead entries 


$2,545.06 
472. 05 


$3, 535. 00 


6, 080. 06 




472. 05 




112. 00 
114. 00 


112. 00 






114. 00 


Indian allotments 






Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 




3, 080. 00 

3.00 
54.00 
23.00 

789. 19 


3, 080. 00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 
tory statement 






3.00 








54.00 








23.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








789. 19 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,271 


114, 704. 36 


3,017.11 


7,710.19 


122,426.87 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 


Incidental expenses 










3, 287. 36 












69.00 














Total 










9, 356. 36 















276 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

WALLA WALLA, WASH. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




37 
7 
1 

48 

57 

1 

1 

189 


2, 107. 07 






S3, 425. 85 




680. 00 
80.00 

268. 12 

9, 998. 90 

[69. 39] 

[160. 00] 

[27, 597. 19] 






1, 700. 00 


Under act Mar. 3, 1887, section 5 






200. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations . 






492. 24 


Original entries under the desert-land act. 






2, 499. 75 







69.39 


Timber-culture entry commuted under 
act Mar. 3, 1891 






200. 00 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S... 







55 830.27 













341 

642 
172 

2 
1 

72 

2 
1 


13, 134. 09 






64,417.50 
11,934.10 




94, 780. 75 
[25,210.70] 

[237. 75] 

40.00 

11,209.18 


$5, 854. 10 
1,491.97 


$6, 080. 00 




1,491.97 
8.00 


Final entries under the timber-culture 


8.00 

2.00 

144. 00 

70.00 

6.00 
3.00 
69. 00 

1, 269. 08 


Lands selected under grants to railroads . . 




2.00 


State selections 




144. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 




70.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






6 00 








3.00 








69.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








1,269.08 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,240 


119, 164. 02 


1 
7,346.07 j 7,651.08 


79, 414. 65 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 












2, 447. 09 
66.70 
























Total 










8, 513. 79 













WATERVILLE, WASH. 





11 

142 
6 

78 
16 
5 

193 


445. 33 

19, 640. 65 
821. 66 

333. 39 

1, 992. 14 

[360. 23] 

[29, 126. 08] 






$648. 66 








49,102.69 








4, 120. 00 
483. 29 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 






Original entries under the desert-land act . 






497. 81 


Final entries tinder the desert-land act 






360. 23 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






42, 460. 67 












451 
950 

146 

86 
1 

19 
9 

147 

2 
3 
1 


23, 233. 17 
138, 788. 73 
[19, 893. 55] 

12, 324. 73 

40.81 

2, 905. 82 






97, 673. 35 

15, 061. 41 

803. 05 




$6,171.41 
803. 05 

462. 19 


$8, 890. 00 


Final homestead entries 


Original homestead entries (Colville Indian 
Reservation) 


795.00 

2.00 

38.00 

90.00 

1,470.00 

6.00 

9.00 

3.00 

112. 00 

70S. 49 


1,257.19 


Lands selected under grants to railroads... 


2.00 






38.00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




90.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 






1 470 00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 




6.00 


Coal land declaratory statements 






9.00 








3.00 








112. 00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








708. 49 




\" 








Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1, 815 


177, 293. 26 


7, 436. 65 


12,123.49 


117,233.49 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 








6, 000. 00 










2, 373. 76 
103. 35 


Expense of depositing public monevs 






:::::::::::::::::;:::::: 












Total 








8, 477. 11 








— — 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 277 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
WATERVILLE, WASH.— Continued. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sion. 


Fees. 


Amount. 


Cash sales, Colville Indian Reservation 
lands: 


5 


403. 28 






$1,008.21 




1 | 17.72 

2 ' 59 35 

11 [i,72o!ob] 

9 46.51 






90.00 








14.84 




2, 580. 00 
69.81 
















Total .' 


2g |/ [1,720.00 


1 




3, 762. 86 






^ ozo. »t» 


J 







ASHLAND, WIS. 





54 
17 
19 


4,003.79 
125. 70 

[1,583.70] 




$10, 009. 49 
301. 41 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 




Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 




3, 559. 28 










90 
326 

83 

54 
3 


4, 129. 49 
41,105.68 
[9, 052. 13] 




13, 870. 18 
4,819.30 




$2, 004. 30 
430. 08 


$2, 815. 00 




430. 08 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 


540. 00 

6.00 

710. 38 


540.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 






6.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






710. 38 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


556 


45, 235. 17 


2,434.38 


4,071.38 


20, 375. 94 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 








4,968.16 










907. 36 












Total 






J 


5, 875. 52 













EAU CLAIRE, WIS. 



Sale of land at public auction 


1 
9 

14 

38 


40.00 
560. 00 

75.13 

[2, 874. 89] 






$50. 00 








1,400.00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 
culture, and other entries and locations.. 






115.27 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






4,241.00 












62 
297 
241 

2 

9 


675. 13 
24, 421. 46 
[23, 807. 95] 

80.00 






5, 806. 27 




$821. 34 
902. 83 


$1,960.00 


2,781.34 


Final homestead entries 


902. 83 


Lands entered with private land scrip, 
act June 2, 1858 






Applications to purchase timber and stone 




90.00 
56.00 

578. 51 


90.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices. . 






56.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








578. 51 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


611 


25, 176. 59 


1,724.17 


2, 684. 51 


10,214.95 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 








3, 564. 79 


Incidental expenses 




1 




1,213.92 










Total 




1 




4,778.71 






1 







278 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, ets. — Continued. 

WAUSAU, WIS. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sion. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




3 
47 


120.00 
3.410.96 






$155. 00 








8, 526. 91 
79.37 


Excess payments on homestead, timber 
culture, and other entries and locations. . 

Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 


7 55 17 






75 
1 


[5.248.21] 
n 60. 001 






7, 210. 35 
200. 00 


Cash substitution for military bounty land 


















133 | 3,586.13 
231 15.832.09 






16,171.63 

1,859.38 

575. 89 




$449. 38 
575. 89 


$1, 410. 00 




219 
2 

47 


[20, 919. 64] 
120. 00 


Lands entered with private land scrip 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands ' 








470. 00 

33.00 

1, 108. 80 


470. 00 










33.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 








1, 108. 80 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


632 


19, 538. 22 


1,025.27 


3,021.80 


20,218.70 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 










3, 960. 42 












1, 181. 02 












4.60 














Total 










5, 146. 04 


I 











BUFFALO, WYO. 



Sales of land at public auction 


7 
65 
16 

13 

115 

59 

41 


400. 00 
6, 384. 07 
1,922.36 

54.91 
18, 272. 52 
[8, 440. 39] 

[6, 028. 56] 






$500. 00 


Sales of timber and stone lands 






15, 960. 18 


Sales of coal lands 






38, 447. 20 


Excess payments on homestead, timber 






68.66 


Original entries under the desert-land act. . 






4, 568. 17 






8, 440. 39 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






7, 535. 71 












316 
215 
84 
2 
160 
413 

65 
12 


27,033.86 
30, 403. 47 
[10, 794. 37] 
[320. 00] 
25, 169. 62 






75, 520. 31 




$1, 140. 13 
404. 81 


$1,975.00 


3, 115. 13 




404.81 




8.00 

320. 00 

1,239.00 

650. 00 
36.00 
33.00 

12.00 

607.78 


8.00 






320. 00 


Applications to purchase coal lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 




1,239.00 






650. 00 








36.00 








33.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declaratory 
statements 


4 






12.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






607. 78 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,271 


82, 606. 95 


1,541.94 


4, 880. 78 


81, 946. 03 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










6, 000. 00 












1,695.92 












226. 50 














Total 










7, 922. 42 















REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 279 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

CHEYENNE, WYO. 



<> 

Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




4 
47 
35 
2 
4 

22 
92 
65 

23 


362. 68 

5, 494. 97 

2, 280. 10 

80.00 

608. 23 

101.16 
14, 897. 20 
[8, 669. 59] 

T3. 364. 621 






$453. 35 








13, 737. 36 








9, 010. 00 
800. 00 














760. 29 


Excess payments on homestead, timber 






142. 15 


Original entries under the desert-land act . 






3, 724. 27 






8, 669. 59 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






4, 599. 85 














294 23,824.34 
259 36. 253. 89 






41, 896. 86 




$1, 729. 86 
676. 68 


$2, 380. 00 


4, 109. 86 




113 

3 

255 

33 

115 

47 
4 


[14, 218. 09] 

[480. 00] 

40, 443. 20 


676. 68 




12 
510. 00 
330. 00 
345. 00 

470. 00 
40.00 
18.00 

3.00 

529. 50 


12.00 






510. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




330. 00 






345 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 






470. 00 








40.00 






18.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


1 




3.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 




1 


529. 50 










Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1, 124 


100,521.43 


2, 406. 54 


4, 637. 50 


48, 940. 90 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 




1 




6, 000. 00 






! 




2. 856. 00 












Total 








8, 856. 00 






1 







DOUGLAS, WYO. 



Sale of land at public auction 


1 
53 
2 

10 
76 
75 

46 


157.78 

4, 599. 67 

280. 00 

102. 71 


1 


$ 197. 23 


Sales of timber and stone lands 


< 


11,499.15 


Sales of abandoned military reservations . . 




350. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber 
culture, and other entries and locations . 




128. 35 


Original entries under the desert-land act. 


11, 384. 16 
[10,913.32] 

[7, 052. 08] 




2,846.14 


Final entries under the desert-land act 


1 


10, 913. 32 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 




8, 815. 10 








Total cash sales 


263 
208 
77 
2 
11 
4 
18 

53 
10 


16, 524. 32 
31,724.78 




34, 749. 29 




n iflnnfi i »9 nm no 


3. 200. 06 




[11,237.66] 499.05 


422. 05 


Final entries under the timber-culture laws. 


[230. 04] 
1, 757. 82 




8.00 
22.00 
40.00 
54.00 

530. 00 
30.00 

558. 79 


8.00 


State sel ections 




22. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 





40.00 


Applications to purchase coal lands 




54.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 






530. 00 


Reservoir declaratory statements 






30.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






558. 79 


Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 










646 


50, 006. 92 


1,612.11 


3, 252. 79 


39, 614. 19 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










4, 549. 74 


Incidental expenses 










1,542.40 














Total 










6, 092. 14 















280 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 
EVANSTON, WYO. 



Class of entry, 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




, 1 
3 
1 

35 

12 

9 
72 

88 

8 


40.13 

440. 31 

200. 00 

5, 227. 20 

1, 442. 56 

65.96 

12, 074. 38 
[19, 072. 91] 

[1, 193. 16] 






$50. 16 








1,100.78 








500. 00 








104, 544. 00 

2, 214. 27 
94. 76 


Sales of abandoned military reservations 
under acts of Aug. 23, 1894 (28 Stats., 491), 
and May 31. 1902 (32 Stats., 283) 






Excess payments on homestead, timber 
culture, and other entries and locations . 






Original entries under the desert-land act. 






3, 018. 65 


Final entries under the desert-land act 






19, 072. 91 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301 , R. S 






1,791.45 









Total cash sales 


229 
109 
88 
141 
4 
121 

3 


19, 490. 54 
15, 294. 73 
[12, 658. 87] 
22, 445. 18 






132, 386. 98 


Original homestead entries 


$675. 26 
664. 09 


$1,005.00 


1,680.26 


Final homestead entries 


664. 09 


State selections 


282. 00 

40.00 

363. 00 

30.00 

273. 74 


282. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




40.00 


Applications to purchase coal lands 






363. 00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 






30.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 






273. 74 












Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


695 


57,230.45 


1, 339. 35 


1, 993. 74 


135* 720. 07 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










5, 903. 83 












1, 278. 91 












53.85 














Total 










7, 236. 59 















LANDER, WYO. 



Sale of land at public auction 


1 
5 
1 
1 

20 
107 
35 

8 


80.00 

559. 61 

6.79 

78. 72 

91. 12 
15, 710. 60 
[5, 080. 53] 

[1,280.00] 




$124. 00 


Sales of timber and stone lands 




1, 399. 07 


Sale of mineral lands 




35.00 


Sale of coal lands 




787. 20 


Excess payments on homestead, timber 
culture, and other entries and locations . 






113. 93 


Original entries under the desert-land act . 






3, 927. 64 


Final entries under the desert-land act 






5, 080. 53 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






1,600.00 










Total cash sales 


178 

192 

69 

10 

2 

38 

5 
1 


16, 526. 84 
27,463.13 

[8, 818. 36] 
1, 480. 00 






13, 067. 37 


Original homestead entries 


$1,029.93 
330. 79 


$1,765.00 


2, 794. 93 




330. 79 


State selections 


20. 00 

20.00 

114. 00 

50.00 
3.00 
4.00 

239. 10 


20. 00 


Applications to purchase mineral lands 




20.00 


Applications to purchase coal lands 

Applications to purchase timber and stone 
lands 






114. 00 






50.00 


Reservoir declaratory statement 






3.00 


Amount received for cancellation notices. . 






4.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony 
to writing 








239. 10 











Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


495 


V 
45, 469. 97 


1, 360. 72 


2, 215. 10 


16, 643. 19 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 
and receiver 










3, 072. 10 












313. 28 














Total 










3, 385. 38 















REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 281 

Statement of the business transacted at the local land offices, etc. — Continued. 

SUNDANCE, WYO. 



Class of entry. 


Num- 
ber. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Fees. 


Amount. 




7 

68 
1 

28 
62 
10 

38 


320. 00 

8, 866. 74 

159. 37 

92.31 
10, 865. 14 
[1, 759. 35] 

[6,069.95] 






$442. 00 








22, 166. 94 






400. 00 


Excess payments on homestead, timber- 




115. 46 


Original entries under the desert-land act. 




2, 716. 31 




1, 759. 35 


Homestead entries commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 




7, 587. 83 








214 


20, 303. 56 

44, 292. 72 

[15, 678. 69] 

T320.00I 






35, 187. X9 




289 
105 

2 


$1, 662. 60 
589. 51 


$2, 790. 00 


4, 452. 60 
589. 51 






8.00 

22. 00 

10.00 

1,185.00 

670. 00 

18.00 

9.00 

36.00 

478. 06 


8.00 




11 1 . 760. 24 




22. 00 




1 






10.00 








1,185.00 


Applications to purchase timber and stone 


67 






670. 00 




6 


:::::::::::::: 




18.00 








9.00 


Soldiers' and sailors' homestead declara- 


12 






36.00 


Amount received for reducing testimony to 






478. 06 








Total of all classes of entries and 
amount received therefrom 


1,102 66,356.52 


2, 252. 11 


5, 226. 06 


42, 666. 06 


Salaries, fees, and commissions of register 


! 






6, 000. 00 




:::::::::::::::::::::: 






1, 537. 09 




! 




153. 55 










Total 








7, 690. 64 













STATE OF ILLINOIS. 



Excess payment on homestead, timber- 


1 
1 


4.90 
[40. 00] 






$6.12 


Homestead entry commuted to cash un- 
der section 2301, R. S 






50.00 










Total cash sales 


2 


4.90 






56.12 










Total of all classes of entries and 


2 


4.90 






56.12 











282 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Statement showing the total amount of fees and commissions collected at the several local land 
offices during the fiscal gear ended Jane 30, 1904; also the net revenue arising therefrom, 
after deducting the amounts earned and paid to registers and receivers as compensation 
for services rendered during same period. 



State, Territory, and 
office: 



Alabama: 

Huntsville 

Montgomery . . 

Alaska: 

Juneau 

Arizona: 

Prescott 

Tucson 

Arkansas: 

Camden 

Dardanelle ... 

Harrison 

Little Rock . . . 

California: 

Eureka 

Independence 
Los Angeles... 

Marysville 

Redding 

Sacramento . . . 
San Francisco. 

Stockton 

Susanville 

Visalia 

Colorado: 

Akron 

Del Norte 

Denver 

Durango 

Glen wood 

Gunnison 

Hugo 

Lamar 

Leadville 

Montrose 

Pueblo 

Sterling 

Florida: 

Gainesville ... 

Idaho: 

Blackfoot 

Boise 

Coeur d'Alene 

Hailey 

Lewiston 

Iowa: 

Des Moines . . . 

Kansas: 

Colby 

Dodge City . . . 

Topeka 

Wakeeney — 

Louisiana: 

Natchitoches . 
New Orleans . . 

Michigan: 

Marquette 

Minnesota: 

Cass Lake 

Crookston 

Duluth 

St. Cloud 

Mississippi: 

Jackson 



Amount of 
fees and com- 
missions from 
disposal of 

public land. 



$5, 277. 00 
7,629.61 



364. 42 



4, 488. 52 
7, 826. 36 



16, 569. 35 
9, 179. 61 

21.415.62 
8, 426. 72 



9, 213. 72 
1, 148. 45 

10, 676. 95 
2, 066. 45 
8,911.16 
4, 636. 86 

10, 922. 95 
4, 829. 25 
4,382.43 
3, 834. 79 



4, 064. 57 

1, 823. 27 
16, 969. 35 

6, 214. 87 
11, 130. 94 

1,847.25 
12, 382. 40 

5, 641. 92 
1, 673. 60 

6, 040. 99 
14, 829. 88 

3, 027. 02 



25, 471. 40 



9, 575. 64 
19,511.72 
15, 839. 00 

6, 167. 54 
19, 589. 15 



1,032.62 



4, 677. 79 

13, 793. 34 

477. 83 

10, 008. 17 



6, 040. 75 
8, 151. 16 



.556.42 



11,938.97 

32, 749. 98 

35, 305. 58 

6, 070. 73 



10, 642. 74 



Amount paid 
I registers and 
Total. j receivers (sal- 
aries and com- 
missions). 



$12, 906. 61 
364. 42 

12, 314. 88 
55, 591. 30 



60, 623. 01 



85, 646. 06 
25,471.40 

70, 683. 05 
1,032.62 

28, 957. 13 

14, 191. 91 
7, 556. 42 

86,065.26 
10, 642. 74 



$3, 761. 82 
4, 521. 96 



3, 379. 23 



5, 226. 44 
6, 000. 00 



6, 000. 00 
4, 543. 30 
6, 000. 00 
4, 812. 74 



6, 000. 00 
1, 976. 78 
6, 000. 00 
2, 524. 01 
6, 000. 00 
4, 836. 40 
6, 000. 00 
4, 299. 86 
5, 123. 69 
3,639.40 



3, 302. 78 
2, 271. 40 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6,000.00 
2, 676. 60 
6, 000. 00 
5, 362. 66 
2,901.85 
5. 534. 56 
6, 000. 00 
2, 718. 58 



, 000. 00 



6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
3, 963. 22 
6, 000. 00 



2, 019. 00 



3, 695. 02 
6, 000. 00 
1,346.10 

5, 480. 22 



5, 323. 69 
6, 000. 00 



6, 000. 00 



6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
4, 774. 98 



5, 848. 53 



Total. 



$8,283.78 
3, 379. 23 

11,226.44 
21,356.04 



$3,014.81 



46, 400. 14 



54, 768. 43 
6, 000. 00 



27, 963. 22 
2,019.00 

16, 521. 34 

11, 323. 69 
6,000.00 

22, 774. 93 
5,818.53 



Deficit. 



Revenue to 
United 

States. 



$4,622.83 



34, 235. 26 



14, 222. 87 



30, 877. 63 
19, 471. 40 



42, 719. 83 



12,435.79 

2, 868. 22 
1, 556. 42 

63, 290. 28 
4, 794. 21 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 283 

Statement showing the total amount of fees and commissions collected at the several local land 

offices, etc. — Continued. 



State, Territory, and 
office. 



Missouri: 

Boonville . . 

Ironton 

Springfield. 

Montana: 

Bozeman... 
Great Falls 

Helena 

Kalispell... 
Lewistown. 
Miles City.. 
Missoula . . . 



Nebraska: 

Alliance 

Broken Bow . 

Lincoln 

McCook 

North Platte. 

O'Neill 

Sidney 

"Valentine 



Nevada: 

Carson City 

New Mexico: 

Clayton 

Las Cruces . 

Roswell 

Santa Fe... 



North Dakota: 

Bismarck 

Devils Lake.. 

Fargo 

Grand Forks. 
Minot 



Oklahoma: 

Alva 

Elreno 

Guthrie 

Kingfisher , 

Lawton 

Mangum . . . 
Oklahoma . 
Woodward . 



Oregon: 

Burns 

La Grande . . 
Lakeview . . . 
Oregon City. 
Roseburg . . . 
The Dalles . . 



South Dakota: 

Aberdeen 

Chamberlain. 

Huron 

Mitchell 

Pierre 

Rapid City . . . 
Watertown .. 



Utah: 

Salt Lake City 

Washington: 

North Yakima 

Olympia 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Vancouver 

Walla Walla... 
Waterville 



Amount of 
fees and com- 
missions from 

disposal of 
public land. 



$3, 138. 25 
2, 957. 28 
7,554.55 



14, 251. 09 
15, 627. 04 
6, 132. 87 
5, 469. 68 
7, 950. 17 
9, 728. 52 
6, 449. 01 



13, 058. 95 
11,926.97 
• 759. 73 
4,621.85 

10, 248. 51 

11, 961. 13 
9,301.36 

12, 396. 56 



5, 924. 25 



9, 096. 36 
12, 753. 90 

3, 557. 66 
18, 292. 04 

7, 059. 13 

18, 392. 56 

850. 91 

88, 832. 42 



3, 843. 85 
18, 633. 67 
10, 330. 77 
11,200.47 
29, 838. 60 
21,398.39 



5, 579. 62 
34, 256. 39 

5, 039. 43 

1,812.31 
21,858.98 
12, 448. 83 

4, 658. 46 



6, 447. 



10, 569. 04 
4, 633. 32 
11,071.00 
21,405.05 
10, 727. 30 
14, 997. 15 
19, 560. 14 




Total. 



«13, 650. 08 



65, 608. 38 



74, 275. C6 
5, 924. 25 



42, 195. 31 



189, 462. 18 



158,834 98 



95,245.75 



85,654.02 
6,447.82 



92, 963. 00 



j Amount paid 
J registers and 
receivers (sal- 
ries and com- 
missions). 



$2, 575. 22 
2, 518. 02 
4,860.58 



6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 



5,991.18 
5, 382. 74 
1,453.25 
2, 998. 74 
5, 550. 32 
6, 000. 00 
4, 357. 09 
6, 000. 00 



5, 664. 26 



6, 000. 00 
3, 556. 82 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 



6,000.00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
4, 897. 76 
6, 000. 00 



6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
4, 152. 16 
6, 000. 00 
6, COO. 00 
6, 000. 00 
1,543.53 
6, 000. 00 



3, 363. 32 

6, 000. 00 
6,000.00 
6,000.00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 



4, 381. 66 
6, 000. 00 
4, 334. 81 
2, 433. 48 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
4, 803. 48 



6, 000. 00 



6, 000. 00 
5, 976. 36 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 



Total. 



Deficit, 



$9, 953. 82 



42, 000. 00 



37, 733. 32 
5, 664. 26 



21,556.82 



28, 897. 76 



41,695.69 



33, 363. 32 



33, 953. 43 
6, 000. 00 



41,976.36 



Revenue to 
United 
States. 



$3, 696. 26 



23,608.38 



541.74 
259. 99 



20, 038. 



160, 564. 42 



117,139.29 



61,882.43 



51, 700. 59 
447. 82 



50, 986. 64 



284 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Statement showing the total amount of fees and commissions collected at the several local land 

offices, etc. — Continued. 



State, Territory, and 
office. 



Amount of 
fees and com- 
missions from 

disposal of 
public land, 



Total. 



Amount paid 
registers and 
receivers (sal- 
aries and com 
missions). 



Total. 



Deficit. 



Revenue to 
United 
States. 



Wisconsin: 
Ashland . . 
Eau Claire 
Wausau . . . 



Wyoming: 
Buffalo.... 
Cheyenne . 
Douglas . . . 
Evanston . 

Lander 

Sundance . 



$6, 505. 76 
4,408.68 
4,047.07 



$14, 961. 51 



$4, 968. 16 
3, 564. 79 
3, 960. 42 



6, 425. 72 
7, 044. 04 
4, 864. 90 
3, 333. 09 
3, 575. 82 
7, 478. 17 



6, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
4, 549. 74 
5, 903. 83 
3, 072. 10 
6, 000. 00 



$12, 493. 37 



31, 525. 67 



$2, 468. 14 



1,196.07 



Deduct amount of deficit 

Total net revenue to the United States . 



1,349, 990. sy 



590,678.64 $4,001.19 



763, 313. 44 
4,001.19 



759, 312. 25 



Recapitulation, by States and Territories, of the disposal of the public lands and abandoned 
military reservations during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1900, the areas, and the 
amount received therefrom, and the expenses connected therewith. 

[The areas of commuted homesteads, final homesteads, and final desert entries, and the area and 
amount of Indian land and other areas in brackets, are not included in the grand aggregate.] 



State or Terri- 


Sales of lands subject to pri- 
vate entry. 


Sales of lands at public 
auction. 


Sales of lands subject to 
preemption entry. 


tory. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 










1 
86 
59 

3 
19 
60 


40. 00 

5, 279. 88 

3, 268. 05 

160. 08 

636. 63 

3, 593. 01 


$50. 00 

7, 352. 91 

4, 609. 97 

210. 50 

915. 04 

4, 711. 29 
















1 


160. 00 


$200. 00 












Florida 


2 


i59. 95 


$199. 94 








Idaho 
















1 


[160. 00] 






1 
1 
2 

1 
288 


109. 76 
36.70 
56.55 
[80. 00] 
21, 933. 87 


137. 20 

45. 88 

70.69 

100. 00 

27, 694. 97 




















3 


93.74 


117.18 








Mississippi 






















128 

92 

3 

243 

1 

129 

175 

93 

4 

21 


8, 653. 38 

5, 775. 33 

165. 95 

14, 152. 84 

40.00 

8, 878. 35 

11,192.85 

5, 153. 10 

160. 00 

1,360.59 


12, 483. 88 

7, 839. 41 

207. 44 

26,421.96 

50.00 

13, 450. 37 

15,341.79 

7, 464. 72 

205. 00 

1, 766. 74 


56 


7, 463. 20 9, 529. 02 
















1 


160. 00 


200. 00 






















Oregon 






11 

1 
1 


1, 583. 45 
160. 00 
148. 60 


1,980.44 








200.00 


Washington 


1 


11.29 


45.16 


371.50 
























1 


Total 


296 22,308.12 


28, 293. 84 


1,120 


68, 603. 78 


103, 198. 20 


72 


9,675.25 ! 12,480.96 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 285 

Recapitulation, by States and Territories, of the disposal of the public lands and abandoned 
military reservations, etc. — Continued. 



State or Ter- 


Saies of timber and stone 
lands. 


Sales of mineral lands. 


Original entries under the 
desert-land act. 


ritory. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 




2 


239. 26 


$598. 15 
















16 
127 
125 


1, 129. 61 
10, 174. 91 
14.442.78 


$5, 197. 50 
44, 292. 50 
36,240.00 
42, 429. 70 
67, 913. 77 
















32 


5, 074. 27 


$1, 268. 56 




132 

914 

338 

26 

1,022 

100 

167 

1,440 

338 

1 

3 


12, 707. 05 

137, 920. 04 

43, 613. 23 

2, 613. 42 

140, 971. 69 

11,454.04 

12, 273. 19 

195, 953. 27 

43, 874. 46 

97.20 

240. 00 


31,767.71 

344, 819. 52 

109, 033. 23 

6, 533. 58 

352, 879. 28 

28, 637. 66 

30, 683. 03 

489, 890. 28 

109, 696. 15 

243. 00 

600. 00 




California 

Colorado 


168 11,960.36 
690 15,365.42 


552 

412 


96, 126. 08 
70, 740. 42 


24, 031. 67 
17, 685. 49 


Idaho 


82 


4,601.60 


18, 820. 00 


469 


69, 151. 86 


17, 288. 41 


Michigan 


























Montana 


163 


6, 888. 71 


27, 038. 54 


1.425 


256, 429. 71 


64, 078. 74 


Nevada 


61 
29 


2,581.87 
968. 60 


12. 952. 50 
4, 557. 50 


11 
406 

62 
193 
154 

23 
170 


2, 360. 94 
72, 833. 37 

9, 085. 35 
29, 226. 65 
29, 900. 55 

2,297.91 
27, 300. 22 


590. 25 

18, 208. 36 




4 

3, 260 

12 


520.00 

489, 734. 24 

1, 168. 35 


1, 300. 00 

1,224,337.05 

2,920.88 


2,271.34 


Oregon 

South Dakota. 
Utah 


29 
102 
150 

24 


1,711.65 
7.215 85 
6, 575. 42 
1, 919. 51 


6, 424. 75 
36, 042. 50 
32, 757. 50 

9, 453. 10 


7, 306. 72 

7, 475. 19 

574. 48 


Washington . . 


1,325 
110 
241 


178, 561. 74 

7, 974. 75 

26, 345. 37 


446, 403. 56 
19, 936. 40 
65, 863. 48 


6, 825. 10 


Wyoming 


38 2, 646. 26 


9, 945. 00 


524 


83,204.00 


20, 801. 18 


Total . . . 


9,435 1,306,261.30 


3,266,142.96 1,804 88,182.55 

1 1 


354, 064. 86 


4,433 


753,731,33 188,405.49 



State or Terri- 


Final entries under the 
desert-land act. 


Homestead entries commuted 
to cash under section 2301, R. S. 


Timber - culture entries 
commuted under act of 
March 3, 1891. 




En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 










134 

59 

200 

122 

153 

145 

249 

1 

70 

245 

71 

579 

160 

3 

360 

330 

5 

131 

5,214 

4, 336 

415 

1,065 

3 

746 

132 

164 


[13,677.80] 
[8. 820. 021 


$17,097.48 

11, 275. 04 

28, 580. 73 

21, 582. 40 

27, 346. 33 

22, 393. 47 

46, 947. 09 

50. 00 

11, 519. 05 

43,769.78 

9, 663. 30 

97, 621. 71 

18, 054. 52 

203. 75 

72, 684. 41 

57, 043. 93 

998. 40 

24, 540. 52 

998, 644. 86 

786, 629. 05 
80, 226. 18 

129, 927. 66 
365. 70 

193, 553. 68 
15, 010. 63 
31,929.94 










14 


[2, 271. 67] 


$2, 271. 67 












22, 864. 25 
"16, 545. 89' 
"21, 637. 06' 
17,914.89' 
°32. 367. 901 










68 
75 


[12, 358. 75] 
[13, 290. 13] 


12, 358. 76 
13, 290. 11 












Florida 








Idaho 


190 


[26, 100. 25] 


26, 108. 27 










[40. 00 

[8, 775. L'S 

[26, 439. 64' 

[7,730.63' 

[75, 672. 75" 

[14,365.60 

[163. 00' 

[52, 918. 73' 

[35,944.71' 

[798. 70' 

[19, 640. 42' 

[775, 293. 60' 

[632, 542. 69' 

[62, 164. 37' 

[151,940.65' 

[292. 56" 

[108, 939. 18 

[9,706.80 

[24, 988. 37 




























































































779 


[140,987.01] 


140,987.01 








1 


[160. 00] «200 00 


Nevada 


1 

39 

3 


[320. 00] 

[7,432.68] 

[441. 04] 


320. 00 

7, 432. 68 

441. 04 






























Oregon 


62 
4 
8 

11 


[8, 805. 52] 
[80C.00" 
[940. 61' 

[1, 229. 68; 


8, 805. 52 
800. 00 
941.29 

1,229.68 




South Dakota. 






Utah 




1 


Washington . . 


1 


[160. 00] 200. 00 


Wyoming 


332 


[53, 936. 09] 53. 931 
















Total . . . 


1,586 


[268, 913. 43] 


268,922.12 


15, 092 


[2,142,185.44] 


2,747,659.61 


2 


[320. 00] i 400. 00 



286 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Recapitulation, by States and Territories, of the disposal of the public lands and abandoned 
military reservations, etc. — Continued. 



State or Terri- 
tory. 


Excesses on homestead, 
timber-culture, and 
other entries. 


Sales of coal lands. * 


Sales of town sites. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. Lg^ 


Acres. 


Amount. 


Alabama 


183 
1 

46 
399 
282 
218 
660 
227 
1 
2 

84 
225 

13 
426 
204 

28 
204 
309 

13 
183 
701 
280 
409 
146 
9 
274 

38 
102 


226. 10 

.05 

146. 91 

2, 037. 95 

1, 408. 66 

691. 15 

552. 58 

1,092.06 

4.90 

21. 66 

161. 10 

587. 43 

70.68 

3, 007. 53 

733. 75 

144. 57 

969. 71 

1, 225. 74 

30.88 

575. 56 

2, 676. 20 

524. 20 

2, 158. 85 

765. 92 

65. 15 

1, 366. 41 

256. 00 

508. 17 


$283. 56 

.06 

199. 89 

2, 549. 00 

2, 190. 20 

977. 16 

692. 56 

1, 547. 70 

6.12 

54.16 

266. 84 

902. 94 

88.36 

3, 815. 10 

1,130.04 

191.25 

1,473.36 

1, 646. 77 

44.93 

723. 24 

4, 144. 09 

644. 30 

3, 189. 95 

721. 97 

81.44 

2, 447. 93 

496. 05 

663. 31 






1 



























1 


78.55 


$98. 20 












California 













Colorado 


97 


18, 415. 13 


$196,551.30 








Florida 
















1 


60.00 


225. 00 


Illinois 




















































Michigan 

Minnesota 


























Mississippi 






























12 


1,040.21 


18, 404. 20 






























New Mexico 


7 
12 


560. 00 
463. 80 


8, 800. 00 
9,276.00 








North Dakota . . 


















1 


160. 00 


1, 600. 00 
















Utah 


6 
1 


720. 00 
160. 00 


14, 400. 00 
1, 600. 00 








Washington 








Wisconsin 








Wyoming 


54 


7, 308. 28 


144, 578. 40 


















Total 


5,667 


22,009.87 


31,172.28 


190 


28, 827. 42 


395, 209. 90 


2 


138. 55 


323. 20 



State or Terri- 


Receipts from sales of aban- 
doned military reservations. 


Cash substitution. 


• 
Supplemental payments. 


tory. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 










2 


[239. 37] 


$299. 23 








Arizona 


3 


[462. 76] 


$771. 76 










1 


[160. 00] 


200.00 








Colorado 










0.30 


$0.38 




11 
49 


[1, 475. 89] 
[5, 297. 77] 


1,022.09 
3,233.87 








1 
1 


1.25 


Idaho 








.71 


2.66 




6 

1 

3 
2 
1 
1 
2 


[720. 00] 
[160. 00] 

[390. 36J 

[331. 76 
[160. 00 
[120. 00^ 

[280. oo; 


800. 00 
200. 00 

449. 10 

414. 70 
200. 00 
150. 00 
350. 00 


















Louisiana 


1 


[155.50] 


194. 45 


3 


J [178.14] 
\ .78 


} 25.89 












1 

1 




1.00 












1.00 
















2 


[1, 000. 00] 
[4, 462. 59] 
[1, 305. 65] 


558. 00 
9,259.63 
2, 184. 64 












































1 




2.00 


South Dakota... 


33 


[4, 644. 65] 


5, 994. 62 
183. 20 












Utah .. 




















1 


[160. 00] 


200. 00 










18 


2, 330. 79 


3, 324. 56 






















Total 


H9 |f [18,804.81] 
149 1 2,330.79 


} 26, 726. 82 


20 


[2, 721. 49] 


3, 263. 03 


8 


J [178.14] 
I 1.79 


I 34. 18 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 287 

Recapitulation, by States and Territories, of the disposal of the public lands and abandoned 
military reservations, etc. — Continued. 



State or Terri- 


Sales of land under act of 
Mar. 2, 1895 (28 Stats., 814). 


Sales of land under act of 
May 14, 1898 (30 Stats., 
409). 


Sales of land under act of 
Aug. 31, 1852 (10 Stats., 
143). 


tory. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En. 

tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 




1 


[80. 04] 


$109. 05 
















8 


216. 90 


$542. 26 
















5 


360. 35 


$450. 44 


Mississippi 


4 


[637. 15] 


350. 25 






















Total 


5 


[717. 19] 


459. 30 


8 


216. 90 


542. 26 


5 


360. 35 


450.44 



State or Terri- 


Sales of land under act of 
Feb. 28, 1899 (30 Stats., 910) . 


Sales of land under act of Sales of land under act of 
Sept. 30, 1890 (26 Stats., 502). ! Mar. 3, 1887 (24 Stats., 556). 


tory. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Am0Ullt |tSs. 


Acres. 


Amount. 




1 


20. 14 


$25. 18 






i 
7 


3, 074. 16 


$2, 797. 00 




1 


51.55 


$64.45 ' 










i 1 


160. 49 
80.00 

[79. 20] 
80.00 
















1 2 


200. 00 














2 















1 


200. 00 
















Total 


1 ' 20.14- 


25. 18 


1 


51.55 


64.45 13 


f [79. 20] 
\ 3,394.65 


J 3, 197. 00 



State or Terri- 


Sales of land under act of 
Feb. 12, 1896 (29 Stats., 6). 


Sales of land under act of 
June 2, 1858 (11 Stats., 294). 


Sales of land under act of 
May 31, 1902 (32 Stats., 283). 


tory. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 




1 


160. 00 


$215. 22 
















3 


120. 00 


$150. 00 
















1 


720. 00 


$1, 440. 00 
















Total 


1 


160. 00 


215. 22 


3 


120. 00 


150. 00 


1 


720. 00 


1,440.00 



State or 
Territory. 


Competitive bids. 


Interest payments. 


Sales and payments on land 
under act of Jan. 18, 1897 
(29 Stats., 490). 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


Michigan 


3 




$185. 00 

1.00 

72.25 

























































$8, 535. 71 


13 


\ [11,116.93] 
\ 184. 00 


|$4,010.58 








10.00 
61.00 


























3 
















Total 




329. 25 






8,535.71 


13 


J [11, 116. 93] 
\ 184. 00 


} 4, 010. 58 











State or Terri- 
tory. 


Sales of land under act 
of Feb. 18, 1903 (32 
Stats., 840). 


Sales of land under act 
of June 4, 1897 (30 
Stats., 36; L.D., 31-225). 


Sales of town lots. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


South Dakota .. 


1 


40.00 


$50. 00 














Washington 


1 


6.39 


$16. 00 


3 


Port Angeles. 


$120. 00 












Total 


1 


40.00 


50.00 


1 


6.39 


16.00 


3 


Port Angeles. 


120.00 



288 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Recapitulation, by States and Territories, of the 

military reservations, etc 



of the public lands and abandoned 
Continued. 



State or Territory, 



Total cash sales, 1904. 



Entries. 



Acres. 



Amount 
received. 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Florida 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Louisiana 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi ... 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Mexico.. 
North Dakota 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

South Dakota 

Utah 

Washington.. 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Total . . . 



322 
25 

282 

St 13 
201 

043 

,s4S 



2 

9 

216 

582 

257 

2, 454 

371 

321 

3,465 

768 

94 

799 

6, 241 

4,631 

4, 509 

1,693 

199 

2, 652 

285 

1,494 



465. 36 

1, 346. 56 

15, 474. 64 

29, 588. 13 

255, 949. 32 

152, 145. 25 

3, 486. 03 

216, 514. 55 

4.90 

181. 66 

3, 754. 11 

12, 432. 50 

12, 380. 57 

199, 191. 09 

733. 75 

22, 078. 44 

325, 319. 38 

7, 818. 27 

5, 213. 69 

75, 263. 48 

26, 898. 19 

748. 20 

533, 453. 19 

50, 443. 52 

9, 658. 48 

214, 707. 26 

8, 390. 75 

123, 703. 46 



39, 935 



)7, 344. 73 



$18, 

5, 

60, 

99, 

457, 

437, 
31, 

467, 

1, 
16, 
74, 
41, 

591, 
19, 
28, 

456, 

77, 

15, 

64, 

,044, 

799, 
,317, 

199, 
49, 

669, 
35, 

332, 



387. 47 
739. 82 
177.62 
837. 88 
787. 34 
472. 19 
053. 39 
967. 32 
56.12 



697. 18 
267. 02 
080. 27 

915. 96 
785. 81 

439. 97 
934. 31 
672. 74 
506. 08 
669. 74 
756. 18 
871. 64 
330. 98 
535. 61 
303. 61 
930. 43 
848. 08 
808. 70 



7, 445, 902. 84 



State or Ter- 
ritory. 


Original entries of lands under the homestead laws. 


Final homestead entries. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Commis- F 
sions. r eeh - 


Total fees 
and com- 
missions. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Commis- 
sions. 


Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Florida 


1,006 
20 

452 
4,197 
1,829 
2. 825 
1,913 
3,128 
5 
1,678 

940 

353 
4,908 

827 
1,059 
2, 492 
4,726 

162 
2, 215 
11, 007 
9,494 
3,040 
5,131 
89 
3,553 

854 
1,272 


93, 013. 66 
424. 09 

62, 032. 88 
467,941.43 
266, 317. 64 
420, 035. 01 
247,451.72 
420,774.98 
377. 03 
252, 680. 48 

76, 559. 87 

34, 132. 80 
608, 831. 12 

68,517.19 

95, 202. 74 

362, 882. 38 

1,310,712.56 

24, 589. 13 
339, 180. 77 
1,622,476.41 
1,393,159.86 
1 12, 508. 62 
772, 570. 29 

13, 408. 85 
508, 689. 51 

81,359.23 
185, 432. 72 


$2, 315. 76 
16.56 

2, 428. 55 
11,786.88 
11,570.84 
17, 615. 66 

6,191.37 
17, 512. 31 


$7, 005. 00 
100. 00 
4, 060. 00 
32, 840. 00 
17, 245. 00 
26, 820. 00 
16, 485. 00 
27. 475. 00 


$9, 320. 76 
116.56 

6, 488. 55 
44, 626. 88 
28, 815. 84 
44, 435. 66 
22, 676. 37 
44,987.31 
47.67 
24, 071. 53 

8, 566. 26 

3, 383. 52 
57, 632. 05 

7, 265. 02 

9,794.56 
41,965.31 
65, 045. 74 

2, 873. 35 
34,311.64 
156, 607. 56 
124, 234. 72 
47, 275. 23 
68,413.17 

1,388.31 
60, 692. 80 

9, 460. 02 
19, 352. 84 


749 

20 

130 

1, 573 
777 
739 
464 

1, 121 

7 

300 

528 

146 

1,775 
796 
799 
974 
818 
2 
529 

3,717 

4,102 
744 

1,081 
146 
816 
543 
536 




[76, 470. 72] 
[424.09' 
[18, 092. 15" 
186, 747. 22' 
112,639.07' 
106, 678. 69 
[53, 556. 94' 
160.319.101 


$1, 912. 93 
16.61 
788. 60 
4, 716. 06 
5, 019. 55 
4, 446. 21 
1,339.87 
6, 773. 61 




12. 67 35. 00 


T409. 971 


20.56 


Kansas 

Louisiana 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Mexico . . 
North Dakota. 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

South Dakota. 
Utah . . 


8, 011. 53 

2,321.26 

838. 52 

15, 882. 05 

1,750.02 

2, 529. 56 

IS, 572. 31 

19, 260. 74 

1, 303. 35 

12,861.64 

52,577.56 

34, 844. 72 

18, 800. 23 

19,493.17 

52S. 31 

27, 677. 80 

3, 275. 02 

7,427.84 


16, 060. 00 
6, 245. 00 
2, 545. 00 

41,750.00 
5, 515. 00 
7, 265. 00 

23, 393. 00 

45, 785. 00 
1,570.00 

21, 450. 00 
104, 030. 00 

89, 390. 00 

28, 475. 00 

48, 920. 00 
860. 00 

33, 015. 00 
6, 185. 00 

11,925.00 




43, 182. 04 
'53, 132. 82' 
16, 024. 82' 
197, 308. 68' 
[78, 238. 08' 
[78, 727. 05' 
141,978.71' 
120, 783. 14' 
[316. 61' 
[79, 850. 10 
546, 242. 38' 
626, 600. 61' 
109,637.60' 
161,155.61' 
f-21 . 540. 71 1 


1,542.03 

1,575.85 

400. 61 

5, 693. 64 

2, Oil. 57 
2, 123. 17 
7, 388. 54 

3, 431. 04 

18.00 
3, 006. 61 
16, 777. 47 
15, 665. 50 
4, 644. 60 
4, 854. 72 
863. 43 


Washington .. 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 


[115.474.08 
[53, 779. 72' 
[73, 406. 04' 


6, 674. 42 
1,908.80 
3, 087. 93 


Total.... 


69,175 


10,171,265.97 317,406.23 


626,443.00 


943, 849. 23 


23, 932 


[3, 232, 716. 75] 


106, 701. 93 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 289 



Recapitulation, by States and Territories, of the disposal of public lands and abandoned' 
military reservations, etc. — Continued. 



State or Terri- 


Final timber-culture 
entries. 


Lands entered with mili- 
tary bounty land war- 
rants. 


Lands entered with agri- 
cultural college scrip. 


tory. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 










14 
113 


1, 279. 99 
13, 038. 48 


$32. 00 
326.00 
















6 


960. 00 


$24. 00 




4 
107 


[531. 42] 
[17, 024. 37] 


$16. 00 

428. 00 




Colorado 














1 


160. 00 


4.00 










3 
170 


[400. 00] 
[27, 047. 40] 


12. 00 
680. 00 
























48 

5 

4 

108 

1 


4,261.73 

675. 75 

520. 00 

12, 108. 49 

120.00 


107.00 
17.00 
13.00 

303. 50 
3.00 
























5 


[360.00] 


16.00 
















Montana 


7 
76 
35 

3 
29 

1 

7 


[852. 00] 

[11,894.46' 

[5, 085. 55' 

[480. 00' 
[4,493.88' 

[160. 00' 

[960. 93' 
[1,350.0< 


28.00 
304. 00 
140. 00 

12.00 

116. 00 

4.00 

28.00 

36.00 
























































Utah 














Washington 

Wyoming 






































Total 


456 


[70, 640. 05] 


1,820.00 


294 


32, 164. 44 


805. 50 


6 


960.00 


24.00 



State or Terri- 


Lands entered with 
private land scrip. 


State selections. 


Railroad selections. 


tory. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 










2 


320. 00 


$4.00 


977 

7 

2,180 

6,258 


156, 217. 54 

891. 97 

347,258.62 

1, 000, 215. 15 


$1,954.00 
14.00 




96 


4,467.30 








664 

363 

19 

1,082 


89,703.23 

57, 509. 88 

1, 814. 78 

170,865.71 


1, 328. 00 

726. 00 

38.00 

1,952.00 


4,360.00 










12, 516. 00 


Florida 














304 

8 


47, 268. 72 
1, 194. 51 


608. 00 










16.00 




34 

1 


1,472.28 

80.00 

818. 15 

842. 27 


* 


598. 34 


10 
















594 


93,805.43 


1, 186. 00 


13 


625. 53 


26.00 


Mississippi ! 21 








102 


15, 930. 75 


204. 00 


2,189 
1,168 


348, 742. 12 
186, 665. 24 


4, 378. 00 
2, 336. 00 
















823 
37 
388 
2 
618 
982 


186,428.75 

5, 703. 30 

61,560.90 

25.04 

109, 698. 54 

155, 377. 68 


1,646.00 

74.00 

776. 00 

2 

1,236.00 

1,964.00 












901 
307 


143, 474. 05 
48, 615. 07 


1,802.00 










614. 00 












Utah 








1 

458 


16.76 
72, 399. 68 


2.00 


Washington 








916. 00 




4 


200. 00 










588 


93, 056. 06 


1, 176. 00 






















Total 


174 


7, 880. 00 




6,269 


1,042,398.39 


12, 322. 00 


14. 771 


2, 353, 584. 96 


29, 542. 00 



State or Terri- 
tory. 


Wagon-road selections. 


Indian allotments. 


Swamp lands patented. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


















74. 22 
24, 840. 88 
33, 183. 10 












16 


2, 143. 62 








Florida 














Idaho 








4 


330. 77 




















393. 70 




Michigan 








4 


240.00 






30.95 

194, 172. 42 

23.38 

6, 488. 58 




Minnesota 














Missouri 




















488 


77, 709. 10 


$976. 00 












Washington 


43 


1,895.80 
























Total 


488 


77, 709. 10 


976. 00 


67 


4,610.19 






259, 207. 23 













8970—04- 



■19 



290 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Recapitulation, by States and Territories, of the disposal of the public lands and abandoned 
military reservations, etc. — Continued. 



State or Terri- 


Lands entered with Val- 
entine scrip. 


Commissions on commuted 
homesteads (Indian lands). 


Land entered with Dodge 
scrip. 


tory. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


En_ ! Acre* 
tries. | Acre ■• 


Fees. 




1 
1 


40.00 
40.00 


$1.00 
1.00 




























Colorado 






$30. 60 
415. 06 








Idaho 






























1 


40.00 


$1.00 














763. 27 

551. 07 

95.16 

23.41 

3, 706. 90 

9.60 

1, 220. 31 


































































































































Total . 


2 


80.00 


2.00 






6, 815. 38 


1 


40.00 


1.00 











State or Terri- 


Red Lake and Pembina 
scrip locations. 


Sioux half-breed scrip. 


Small holdings. 


tory. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


En- 
tries. 


Acres. 


Fees. 


Minnesota 


2 


480.00 




3 
1 
1 


200. 00 

40.00 

160. 00 
















8 


447.93 
































Total 


2 


480. 00 




5 


400. 00 




8 


447. 93 













State or Territory. 


Lands entered under dona- 
tion act. 


Total miscellaneous entries. 


Entries. 


Acres. 


Amount. 


Entries. 


Acres. 


Amount 
received. 


Alabama 








1,769 
40 

1,562 

5, 992 

5,471 

10,292 

2,397 

5,642 

12 

2,156 

1,555 

510 

7,322 

1,752 

1,858 

5,765 

5,620 

1,332 

3, 576 

15, 697 

13, 596 

4,971 

6,244 

855 

5,859 

1,401 

2,405 


94, 293. 65 

424. 09 
218, 610. 42 
487, 376. 40 
730, 303. 99 
1,477,760.04 
282, 609. 60 
639, 240. 18 

770. 73 
253, 874. 99 


$11, 265. 69 










133. 17 


Arizona 








9, 236. 15 










49, 706. 94 










39, 540. 39 










62, 582. 47 


Florida 








24,058.24 










54, 747. 98 










68.23 


Kansas 








26. 309. 56 










82, 892. 22 10, 259. 11 


Michigan 








35,199.50 3,802.13 










899,452.65 i 65,329.96 










81,467.95 9,580.09 










95,226.12 11. 917. 73 










727, 675. 25 

1,310, 712. C6 

211, 254. 37 


54, 517. 92 










68, 875. 94 










5. 227. 35 










526,097.45 : 38,964.25 


N orth Dakota 








1,771,653.76 175.424.44 










1, 393, 159. 86 
637, 202. 27 
772, 755. 33 
123,124.15 
738, 362. 67 
81, 559. 23 
278, 488. 78 


143, 607. 12 




1 


320. 00 


$10. 00 


54,317.43 




74, 606. 20 


Utah 








3, 493. 74 










70, 275. 22 


Wisconsin 








11,368.82 










23, 652. 77 












Total 


1 


320. 00 


10.00 


115, 651 


13,951,548.21 


1, 102, 869. 04 







REPOKT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 291 

Recapitulation, by States and Territories, of the disposal of the public lands and abandoned 
military reservations, etc. — Continued. 



State or Territory. 


Preemption 
filings. 


Homestead 
filings. 


Coal filings. 


Reservoir 
filings. 


Valentine scrip 
filings. 


Num- 
ber. 


Fees. 


Num- 
ber. 


Fees. 


Num- 
ber. 


Fees. 


Num- 
ber. 


Fees. 


Num- 
ber. 


Fees. 








1 

1 

5 

4 

8 

1 

4 

25 

13 

1 

6 

12 

185 


$2.00 
3.00 
10.00 
12. 00 
24.00 
2.00 
12.00 
50.00 














1 


$3.00 






2 


$6.00 


2 $2.00 




3 

6 

1,058 


$6.00 

18.00 

3, 174. 00 










i 

40 


3.00 
120.00 






200 


600. 00 














14 


42.00 


2 
9 


6.00 
18.00 






32 


64.00 






26.00 
2.00 
12.00 
36.00 
370. 00 










































59 


177. 00 


129 


387. 00 


6 
11 


18.00 
22.00 






1 








2 
193 


6.00 
579. 00 
372. 00 


...1 








53 
47 

497 
5 

200 


159. 00 


2 
473 


6.00 
946. 00 


1 1.00 








94. 00 186 










994. 00 
15. 00 




i 




2 
2 


6.00 
4.00 


56 


168. 00 

4.00 

576. 00 

132. 00 


2 
725 


6.00 
1,450.00 






400. 00 2 




Utah 




192 

44 


:::::::::::::::: 


Washington 


1 


3.00 


9 
3 

17 


27.00 
6.00 
51.00 


1 


3.00 




:::::::::::::::' 








1.100 


3, 300. 00 


29 


87.00 














Total 


297 


857. 00 


1,097 


2,307.00 2.985 


8, 764. 00 


1,303 


2,691.00 


3 ! 3.00 













State or Territory. 


Mineral appli- 
cations. 


Mineral pro- 
tests. 


Applications for 

timber and stone 

lands. 


Cancella- 
tion fees. 


Fees re- 
ceived for 
reducing 

testi- 
mony to 
writing. 




Num- 
ber. 


Fees. 


Num- 
ber. 


Fees. 


Num- 
ber. 


Fees. 


Amount. 












2 


$20. 00 


$64. 00 


$1, 554. 92 
21.25 




13 

156 

87 

169 

662 


ooooo 
ooooo 

CO SO i~- o> C-l 


8 
20 

1 

12 
92 


$80. 00 
200. 00 
10.00 
120. 00 
920. 00 








25. 00 
85. 00 
43.00 
340. 00 
22.00 
61.00 


1,279.73 




131 

910 

414 

26 

1,020 


1, 310. 00 

9, 100. 00 

4, 140. 00 

260. 00 

10, 200. 00 


3, 593. 36 
10, 096. 62 






7, 125. 59 


Florida 


1, 129. 16 




71 


710. 00 


2 


20.00 


4, 881. 07 
964. 39 


















111. 00 

122. 00 

30.00 

422. 00 

21.00 

79.00 

174. 00 

270. 00 


2, 404. 57 
2, 810. 80 
2, 054. 29 


Louisiana 










100 

167 

1,439 


1,000.00 

1, 670. 00 

14, 390. 00 






















5, 897. 30 












1,039.65 


Missouri 














1,641.35 




175 


1,750.00 


17 


170. 00 


337 


5, 008. 46 




1 
3 


10.00 
30.00 


4, 727. 12 




48 
28 


480. 00 
280. 00 


2 
5 


20. 00 
50.00 


160. 90 




51.00 

1, 280. 00 

757. 00 

96.00 

447. 00 

8.00 

332. 00 

89.00 

64.00 


2, 102. 06 
11,305.74 
13, 478. 86 




4 


40.00 


Oklahoma 










Oregon 


40 
109 
135 

36 


400. 00 
1,090.00 
1, 350. 00 

360. 00 


7 
23 
33 

3 


70.00 
230. 00 
330. 00 

30.00 


3, 282 
12 


32, 820. 00 
120. 00 


7, 347. 32 




7, 302. 82 


Utah 


690. 08 


Washington 


1,384 
110 
240 


13, 840. 00 
1, 100. 00 
2, 400. 00 


7, 960. 78 


Wisconsin 


2, 397. 69 




44 


440. 00 


4 


40.00 


2, 686. 97 




Total 


1,773 


17, 730. 00 


229 


2, 290. 00 


9,582 


95, 820. 00 


4, 993. 00 


111,660.85 





292 REPOET OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Recapitulation, by States and Territories, of the disposal of the public lands and abandoned 
military reservations, etc. — Continued. 



State or Territory. 



Total miscellaneous 
filings and fees. 



Number. Amount. 



Total amount 

of fees and 

commissions 

from disposal 

of public 

lands. 



Amount. 



Aggregate of all classes of entries, 
area of lands disposed of, and re- 
ceipts from all sources. 



Entries. 



Acres. 



Amount. 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Florida 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Louisiana 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Mexico . . 
North Dakota. 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

South Dakota . 

Utah 

Washington... 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



21 

182 

227 

1,102 

2, 474 

27 

1,114 



$1,640.92 

231. 25 

3, 078. 73 

5, 884. 36 

21,082.62 

23, 063. 59 
1,413.16 

15,935.07 



$12, 906. 61 
364. 42 
12,314.88 
55, 591. 30 
60, 623. 01 
85,646.06 
25, 471. 40 
70, 683. 05 



66 

100 

167 

1,452 

1 

6 

735 

197 

55 

283 

710 

497 

3,394 

1,073 

360 

1,478 

113 

1,434 



964. 39 

2, 647. 57 

3, 932. 80 

3, 754. 29 

20, 735. 30 

1,062.65 

1, 732. 35 

11,090.46 

5, 399. 12 

696. 90 

3, 231. 06 

14, 037. 74 

15, 227. 86 

40, 928. 32 

11,047.82 

2, 954. 08 

22, 687. 78 

3, 592. 69 

9, 068. 97 



1,032.62 
28, 957. 13 
14, 191. 91 

7, 556. 42 
86, 065. 26 
10, 642. 74 
13, 650. 08 
65, 608. 38 
74,275.06 

5, 924. 25 
42, 195. 31 
189, 462. 18 
158,834.98 
95,245.75 
85, 654. 02 

6, 447. 82 
92,963.00 
14,961.51 
32,721.74 



2,094 

86 

2, 026 

7, 082 

8,774 

14, 809 

3,272 

9, 065 

2 

21 

2, 438 

2, 237 

934 

11,228 

2, 124 

2,185 

9,965 

6,585 

1,481 

4, 658 

22, 648 

18, 724 

12, 874 

9,010 

1,414 

9,989 

1,799 

5, 333 



94, 

1, 

234, 

516, 

ysii. 

.629. 
2S6. 

855. 



257. 

95, 

47! 

1, 098, 

82; 

117; 

1,052; 

1, 318, 

216 

601 

1, 798 

1. 393 

1,170 

823 

132 

953 

89 

402 



759. 01 
770. 65 

085. 06 
964. 53 
253. 31 
905. 29 
095. 63 
754. 73 

4.90 
952. 39 
629. 10 
324. 72 

580. 07 
643. 74 
201. 70 
304. 56 
994. 63 
5C0. 83 
468. 06 
360. 93 
551.95 
908. 06 
655. 46 
198. 85 
782. 63 
069. 93 
949. 98 
192.24 



$31, 
6, 

72, 
155, 
518, 
523, 

56, 
538, 

2, 

45. 

88! 

48, 
677, 

30! 

42 
522, 
151, 

21 
106! 
1,234 
958 
1,442 
285 

55 
762 

50 
365 



294. 08 
104. 24 
492. 50 
429. 18 
410. 35 
118. 25 

524. 79 
650. 37 

56.12 
102. 00 
654. 31 
458. 93 
636. 69 
981.22 
428. 55 
090. 05 
542. 69 

947. 80 
430. 33 
865. 05 
218.36 
706. 62 
576. 73 
189. 63 
751.43 

893. 43 
809. 59 

530. 44 



Total. 



17, 271 



247, 121. 85 



1,349,990.89 



172, 857 16, 258, 892. 94 



1, 795, 893. 73 





Expenses incident to the disposals of public lands. 


State or Territory. 


Salaries and 

commissions 

of registers 

and receivers. 


Incidental 
expenses. 


Expense of 
depositing. 


Total ex- 
penses. 


Alabama 


$8, 283. 78 

3, 379. 23 

11,226.44 

21, 356. 04 
46, 400. 14 
54, 768. 43 

6, 000. 00 
27, 963. 22 

2,019.00 
16,521.34 
11,323.69 

6, 000. 00 

22, 774. 98 
5, 848. 53 
9, 953. 82 

42,000.00 
37, 733. 32 

5, 664. 26 
21,556.82 
2,8, 897. 76 
41, 695. 69 
33, 363. 32 
33, 953. 43 

6, 000. 00 
41,976.36 
12, 493. 37 
31, 525. 67 


$3, 323. 26 

815. 51 

2, 370. 94 

6, 372. 00 

15, 672. 16 

15, 439. 05 
4, 996. 60 

12,015.70 
97.94 
4, 856. 91 
5,834.55 
2,219.14 

14,434.44 
3, 440. 60 
1,828.82 

18. 043. 12 
7,707.83 

6.96 

5,918.85 

22, 078. 75 

30, 313. 60 

19. 352. 13 
15,361.50 

4, 227. 14 
18, 149. 59 
3, 302. 30 
9, 223. 60 


$5. 65 


$11,612.69 


Alaska 


4, 194. 74 


Arizona 


105. 75 
12.45 

160. 30 

122. 25 
24. 25 

183. 75 


13,703.13 
27 740 49 


California 

Colorado 

Florida 

Idaho 

Iowa 


62, 232. 60 
70, 329. 73 
11, 020. 85 
40, 162. 67 
2,116.94 


Kansas 

Louisiana 

Michigan 


22.85 
10.75 


21,401.13 
17, 168. 99 

8,219.14 
37, 289. 30 

9, 306. 33 
11, 821. 84 
60, 137. 57 
45, 535. 62 

5, 728. 32 


Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 


79.88 

17.20 

39.20 

94.45 

94.47 

57.10 

4.80 

331.80 

610. 62 

2, 099. 77 

85.06 


New Mexico 


27, 480. 47 


North Dakota 


51,308.31 


Oklahoma 


72, 619. 91 
54, 815. 22 


Oregon 


South Dakota 


49, 399. 99 


Utah 


10, 227. 14 


Washington 


293. 00 

4.60 

433. 90 


60, 418. 95 


Wisconsin 


15, 800. 27 


Wyoming 


41. 183. 17 






Total 


590, 678. 64 


247, 403. 02 


4, 893. 85 


842, 975. 51 







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 293 



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103, 198. 20 
12, 480. 96 

3, 266, 142. 96 
354, 064. 86 
268, 922. 12 

2, 747, 659. 61 

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31,172.28 

395, 209. 90 

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26, 726. 82 

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68, 603. 78 

9, 675. 25 

1,306,261.30 

88, 182. 55 

268, 913. 43 

2, 142, 185. 44 

320. 00 

22, 009. 87 

28, 827. 42 

138. 55 

179. 93 

21,135.60 
2, 721. 49 
17, 187. 30 








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= *■; 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 295 



N.-MINERAL DIVISION. 

The following- shows the condition of work June 30, 1903, work 
received during the year, work done during the year, and condition of 
work at close of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904: 

CONTESTS. 

Pending June 30, 1903 (unexamined, 77; examined but not closed, 64) 141 

Received during vear 83 

224 

Closed during year 102 

Pending June 30, 1904 (unexamined, 25; examined but not closed, 97) 122 

QUASI CONTESTS. 

Pending June 30, 1903 (unexamined, 74; examined but not closed, 80) 154 

Received during year 277 

431 

Closed during year 204 

Pending June 30, 1904 (unexamined, 76; examined but not closed, 151).. 227 

MINERAL ENTRIES. 

Pending June 30, 1903 (unexamined, 2,475; examined and suspended, 

492) 2, 967 

Received during year 1, 821 

4, 788 

Approved for patenting during year 2, 591 

Canceled during year 42 

2, 633 



Pending June 30, 1904 (unexamined, 1,221; examined and suspended, 
934) 2,155 

COAL ENTRIES. 

Pending June 30, 1903 (unexamined, 48; examined and suspended, 81) 129 

Received during year 210 

339 

Approved for patenting during year 172 

Pending June 30, 1904 (unexamined, 63; examined and suspended, 104).. 167 

AGRICULTURAL ENTRIES. 

Pending June 30, 1903 250 

Received during vear 344 

594 

Examined and referred during year 340 

Pending June 30, 1904 254 

LISTS OF SELECTIONS (RAILROAD AND STATE). 

Received, examined, and referred during year acres. . 6,426,571.47 



296 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

BONDS OF UNITED STATES MINERAL SURVEYORS. 

Received, examined, and approved during year 189 

LETTERS. 

Received during year 13, 769 

Written during year 8, 356 

MISCELLANEOUS WORK PERFORMED. 

Coal declaratory statements canceled 990 

Classification of lands submitted for approval and approved, approxi- 
mately acres. . 436, 480 

Cases referred to the Department 186 

Cases referred to board of equitable adjudication 5 

Hearings ordered 160 

Pages official copy written 11, 062 

Mineral applications (final proof not made) examined 68 

Mineral applications ( final proof not made ) canceled 48 



REPOET OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 297 



P.— SPECIAL SERVICE DIVISION. 

This division is charged with the duty of protecting the public lands 
from unlawful entry or appropriation and from timber and other tres- 
passes. It supervises the work of a force of special agents employed 
for this purpose, prepares instructions to them covering their duties, 
and refers to them such cases of alleged violations of the laws relating 
to the public lands as may require investigation. It considers their 
reports when received, initiates and carries to conclusion all proceed- 
ings looking to the cancellation of fraudulent entries, and prepares 
cases for reference to the Department of Justice to procure cancel- 
lation of fraudulently obtained patents, to recover damages for tres- 
passes, to compel removal of unlawful inclosures and obstructions, 
and to punish violators of the criminal laws relating to the public 
lands. It has charge of all matters relating to the timber upon unre- 
served public lands, and, since March, 1904, to all matters relating to 
soldiers' additional applications under sections 2306 and 2307 of the 
Revised Statutes. 

During the past year an average of 63 special agents were employed 
in this work under the supervision of a force of clerks in this division 
averaging 26 in number. 

The following shows the condition of the work in this division on 
June 30, 1903, the work received and disposed of during the year, and 
the condition of the work on June 30, 1904: 

LETTERS. 

Received during year 22, 040 

Referred 1, 523 

Personal letters requiring answer pending None. 

Written during year 18, 673 

Pages of press copy books 29, 480 

REPORTS. 

Pending June 30, 1903 2, 513 

Received during year 10, 538 

13,051 

Disposed of during year 11, 791 

Pending June 30, 1904 1 , 260 

UNLAWFUL INCLOSURES. 



Number. Acres. 



Cases reported 

Inclosures reported removed 

Being removed or action pending to compel removal 



137 
39 



1,353,567 
717, 505 



TIMBER DEPREDATIONS. 

Cases reported during year 347 

Value of timber unlawfully taken: 

Stumpage . $141, 883. 25 

Recoverable to Government $337, 515. 43 

Criminal suits recommended 100 

Civil suits recommended 48 

Amount involved in civil suits recommended $33, 548. 09 

Propositions of settlement accepted 68 



298 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



(The suits recommended, propositions of settlement accepted, and sales of timber 
made were based, in part, upon reports made prior to the beginning of the last fiscal 
year, which are not included in this report. ) 
Amounts recovered during year: 

From accepted propositions of settlement $53, 398. 40 

From sales of timber, etc 9, 668. 43 

From compromise of suits (through Department of Justice) 25, 773. 90 

From judgments (through Department of Justice) 11, 371. 40 

From fines (through Department of Justice) 5, 899. 46 

Total 106, 111. 59 

Suits disposed of (reported by Department of Justice): 

Criminal 153 

Civil 77 

Suits pending (reported by Department of Justice) : 

Criminal 324 

Civil .. 125 

Amount involved in civil suits pending $2, 009, 863. 30 

Co tests* ALLEGED FRAUDULENT ENTRIES. 

Pending June 30, 1903 78 

Received during year ^ 204 



282 



138 



144 



Closed during year 131 

Referred during year 7 

Pending June 30, 1904— 

Examined 95 

Unexamined 49 

Entries pending June 30, 1903 18, 341 

Received during year 10, 224 

28, 565- 

Disposed of during year 10, 108 

Pending June 30, 1904 18, 457 

Referred to agents for investigation during year 4, 308 

Held for cancellation or suspended during year 1, 290 

Hearings ordered during year 540 

To Secretary on appeal during year 98 

Suits recommended to set aside patents during year 25 

Classification of entries received during year, disposed of during year, and pending June 

30, 1904- 





Received. 


Approved. 


Canceled. 


Relieved 

from 
suspen- 
sion. 


Referred. 


Pending. 


Soldiers' additional: 

Applications 


2,110 
369 

8 

2,410 
512 
595 

152 
95 

86 
16 

641 
3,082 

6 
61 

1 

4 

76 


99 
140 


237 
4 


346 


682 
144 


2,501 


Entries 


225 






8 


Homesteads: 

Originals 


17 
41 
104 

6 
2 


785 
26 
54 

29 

2 

47 
5 

24 
6 


572 
241 

88 


1,374 
308 
246 

35 

17 

68 
11 

684 
6,496 

6 
9 


3,933 




1,975 




1,807 


Desert land: 

Originals 


196 


Finals 


13 

21 
3 

641 
5,330 

5 
9 


92 


Timber culture: 


248 


Finals 


3 

19 
1,160 

1 


50 


Timber and stone: 

Sworn statements 


1,391 


Cash entries 


5,201 


Mineral: 


13 






131 


Selections: 

State 






4 






2 
10 


8 
8 


10 
18 


27 






655 








Total 


10, 224 


1,592 


1,231 


7,285 


10, 108 


18, 457 







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 299 



R.— FORESTRY DIVISION. 

The work performed by this division during the fiscal }^ear ended 
June 30, 1904, is summarized as follows: 

Letters and reports pending June 30, 1903 1, 956 

Letters and reports received and registered 31, 472 

Total 33, 428 

Letters and reports disposed of 31, 205 

Letters and reports pending. June 30, 1904 2, 223 

Letters written 32, 737 

Pages press copied 52, 061 

Forest officers' accounts adjusted 4, 645 

Number of pages typewritten , 67, 005 

FOREST RESERVES ESTABLISHED. 



State. 


Name of reserve. 


Date of procla- 
mation estab- 
lishing the 
reserve. 


Estimated 
area. 




The Pocatello Forest Reserve 


Sept. 5,1903 
Oct. 24,1903 
Dec. 12,1903 
Dec. 22,1903 
Feb. 5, 1904 
Mar. 5. 1904 
Mar. 5, 1904 
Mav 7, 1904 
May 26,1904 


Acres. 
49, 920 


Utah 


The Aquarius Forest Reserve 


639, 000 


Montana 


The Highwood Mountains Forest Reserve. . . 
The Santa Barbara Forest Reserve a 


45, 080 




1,838,323 




52, 480 




The Cave Hills Forest Reserve 


23, 360 


Do.. 




58, 160 


Utah 


The Grantsville Forest Reserve 


68, 960 


Do 




95, 440 







a This reserve was formed by consolidating the Pine Mountain and Zaca Lake Forest Reserve and 
the Santa Ynez Forest Reserve, and including an additional area. 

FOREST RESERVES ENLARGED. 



State. 


Name of reserve. 


Date of procla- 
mation en- 
larging the 
reserve. 


Present 

estimated 

area. 


Utah 




Nov. 5,1903 
May 2, 1904 


Acres. 
111,600 


Do 




199, 040 









FOREST RESERVES REDUCED. 



State. 


Name of reserve. 


Date of procla- 
mation re- 
ducing the 
reserve. 


Present 

estimated 

area. 


Wyoming and Montana 


The Yellowstone Forest Reserve 


May 4, 1904 
May 16,1904 
Mav 21,1904 
June 14,1904 


Acres. 
a 7, 810, 600- 


Colorado 


The Battlement Mesa Forest Reserve 


808, 960 


Do 


978, 880- 


Idaho and Montana 




4,089,600 









a The proclamation of May 4, 1904, both added to the reserve 130,560 acres and excluded therefrom 
19,160 acres, making a net reduction in area of 518,600 acres. 



300 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



FOREST RESERVE ABOLISHED. 



State. 


Name of reserve. 


Date of Execu- 
tive order 
abolishing the 
reserve. 


Estimated 
area. 






Oct. 9, 1903 


Acres. 
56, 320 









There are, accordingly, now 59 forest reserves, created by Presi- 
dential proclamations, under section 24 of the act of March 3, 1891 
(26 Stats., 1095), embracing 62,763,494 acres, as follows: 



EXISTING FOREST RESERVES. 



State or Territory. 



Name of reserve. 



Date of proc- 
lamation cre- 
ating reserve 
or changing 
boundary 
thereof.* 



Present 

estimated 

area. 



Alaska 

Do 

Arizona 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

California 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Colorado 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Idaho 

Idaho and Montana 

Idaho and Washington 

Montana 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Nebraska 

Do 

New Mexico 

Do 

Do 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Do 

Do 

Do 

South Dakota 

Do 

South Dakota and Wyoming. 

Utah 

Do 



Afognak Forest and Fish Culture Reserve . 
The Alexander Archipelago Forest Reserve 
Grand Canyon Forest Reserve 

TheSanFranciscoMountains Forest Reserve 

The Black Mesa Forest Reserve 

The Prescott Forest Reserve 

The Santa Rita Forest Reserve 

The Santa Catalina Forest Reserve 

The Mount Graham Forest Reserve 

The Chiricahua Forest Reserve 

San Gabriel Timber Land Reserve 

Sierra Forest Reserve 

San Bernardino Forest Reserve 

The Trabuco Canyon Forest Reserve 

The Stanislaus Forest Reserve 

The San Jacinto Forest Reserve 

The Lake Tahoe Forest Reserve 

The Santa Barbara Forest Reserve 

The White River Forest Reserve 

Pike's Peak Timber Land Reserve 

Plum Creek Timber Land Reserve 

The South Platte Forest Reserve 

The Battlement Mesa Forest Reserve 

The San Isabel Forest Reserve 

The Pocatello Forest Reserve 

The Bitter Root Forest Reserve 

The Priest River Forest Reserve 

The Lewis and Clarke Forest Reserve 

The Gallatin Forest Reserves 

The Little Belt Mountains Forest Reserve . 

The Madison Forest Reserve 

The Highwood Mountains Forest Reserve . 

The Dismal River Forest Reserve 

The Niobrara Forest Reserve 

The Pecos River Forest Reserve 

The Gila River Forest Reserve 

The Lincoln Forest Reserve 

Wichita Forest Reserve 

Bull Run Timber Land Reserve 

The Cascade Range Forest Reserve 

Ashland Forest Reserve 

The Baker City Forest Reserve 

The Cave Hills Forest Reserve 

The Slim Buttes Forest Reserve 

The Black Hills Forest Reserve 

The Uintah Forest Reserve 

The Fish Lake Forest Reserve 

a Even sections only. 



Dec. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Apr. 

Aug. 

May 

Oct. 

Apr. 

Julv 

July 

July 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Apr. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

June 

May 

Feb. 

Mar. 

June 

Dec. 

Dec. 

May 

Apr. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

June 

Feb. 

Feb. 

June 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Jan. 

May 

Mar. 

July 

July 

June 

Sept, 

July 

Sept, 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

May 



24. 1892 
20, 1902 

20. 1893 
17, 1898 
12, 1902 
17, 1898 

10. 1898 

21. 1899 
11,1902 

2. 1902 
22, 1902 

30. 1902 

20. 1892 

14. 1893 
25, 1893 
25, 1893 
30, 1899 
22, 1897 
22, 1897 
13,1899 

22. 1903 

16. 1891 
28, 1902 

21. 1904 
11,1892 

18. 1892 
23, 1892 

9, 1892 

24. 1892 
16, 1904 
11,1902 

5. 1903 
22, 1897 
14, 1904 
22, 1897 

22. 1897 

9. 1903 
10, 1899 
16, 1902 
16, 1902 
12,1903 
16, 1902 
16, 1902 
11,1892 

27. 1898 
2, 1899 

26, 1902 
4, 1901 
17,1892 

28. 1893 
1,1901 

28, 1893 

5. 1904 
5, 1904 
5, 1904 

22. 1897 

19. 1898 
22, 1897 

10. 1899 
2, 1904 



Acres. 

403, 640 
4, 506, 240 
1,851,520 

1, 975, 310 

1,658,880 

423, 680 

387, 300 
155, 520 
118, 600 
169,600 
555, 520 
4, 096, 000 
737, 280 

109,920 

691,200 

668, 160 

136,335 

1, 838, 323 

978, 880 

184, 320 

179, 200 
683,520 

808, 960 

77, 980 
49,920 

4,089,600 

645, 120 

4, 670, 720 

a 40, 320 
501,000 
736, 000 
45. 080 
85, 123 
123, 779 

431, 040 

2, 327, 040 

500, 000 

57, 120 

142, 080 

4, 436, 120 

18, 560 
52, 480 
23, 360 
58, 160 

1, 209, 760 

875, 520 

199, 040 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 301 

EXISTING FOREST RESERVES— Continued. 



State or Territory. 



Name of reserve. 



Date of proc- 
lamation cre- 
ating reserve 
or changing 
boundary 
thereof. 



Present 

estimated 

area. 



Utah 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Washington 

Do 

Do 

Wyoming 

Do 

Wyoming and Montana 



The Payson Forest Reserve 

The Logan Forest Reserve 

The Manti Forest Reserve 

The Aquarius Forest Reserve . . . 
The Grantsville Forest Reserve. . 
The Salt Lake Forest Reserves . . 

The Washington Forest Reserve 



The Olympic Forest Reserve 

The Mount Rainier Forest Reserve. 
The Big Horn Forest Reserve 

The Medicine Bow Forest Reserve . 



The Yellowstone Forest Reserve 



/Aug. 3, 

\Nov. 5, 

May 29, 

May 29, 

Oct. 24, 

May 7, 

Mav 26, 

/Feb. 22, 

\Apr. 3, 

Feb. 22, 

Apr. 7, 

July 15, 

Feb. 22, 

(Feb. 22, 

{June 29, 

[May 22, 

/Mav 22, 

/July 16, 

I Mar. 30, 
Sept. 10, 
May 22, 
June 13, 
Jan. 29, 
May 4, 



1901 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1904 
1904 
1897 
1901 
1897 i 

1900 I 

1901 I 
1897 
1897 
1900 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1891 
1891 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1904 



Acres. 
111,600 

182, 080 

584, 640 

639, 000 

68, 960 

95, 440 

3, 426, 400 

1,466,880 
2,027,520 
1, 216, 960 

420, 584 



7, 810, 600 



FOREST RESERVE FORCE. 

The graded force in the field consisted during the past year of 5 
forest superintendents, 50 forest supervisors, 3 forest inspectors, and 
a varying number of forest rangers, the maximum number thereof 
employed at any one time being 484 and the minimum number 200. 

SHEEP GRAZING IN FOREST RESERVES. 

The following table shows the forest reserves in which sheep grazing 
has been allowed and the number of sheep that it was decided could 
enter for each } 7 ear, 1901 to 1904, inclusive. 

There are certain areas closed against sheep in nearly every reserve, 
and in some of them but a small portion is opened to sheep. 

Sheep grazing in forest reserves. 

SHEEP ALLOWED TO ENTER. 



Reserve. 


State or Territory. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


Black Mesa 


Arizona 


225,000 


150,000 


100,000 



100, 000 

2,500 

150, 000 

40, 000 


100, 000 




do 


a 3, 200 




do.... 


125, 000 


100, 000 


100, 000 


Santa Rita 


do 





Gila River 


New Mexico 

do 


225, 000 


200, 000 


150, 000 


Lincoln 


40, 000 




Utah 






75, 000 


Fish Lake 


do 











30, 000 


Logan 


do 


35, 000 




...do ... 








300, 000 


Pavson 


...do ... 






200, 000 



125,000 


30, 000 


Uintah 


do... 


200, 000 


125, 000 


Highwood Mountains 




36, 000 




...do ... 






25, 000 

50, 000 

200, 000 

25, 000 

40, 000 

443, 900 

157, 000 

20, 000 


20,000 
50, 000 


Madison 


...do ... 






Cascade Range 




200, 000 
150, 000 


200, 000 
150, 000 


197, 000 


Big Horn 




25, 000 


Medicine Bow 


do 


40, 000 


Yellowstone 


...do ... 






281,550 


Mount Rainier 


Washington 

...do 


250, 000 
25,000 


172, 000 
25, 000 


154, 000 


Washington 


b 20, 000 






Total 


1,400,000 


1, 197, 000 


1,478,400 


1,811,750 







a Goats. b Forty thousand additional in case range is found to be as represented by sheep owners. 



302 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

The following table shows the number of permits actually issued 
and the number of sheep covered thereby for each reserve in which 
sheep were allowed to graze for each of the years 1901 to 1901, inclusive. 
The permits issued in 1904 covered practically all the sheep allowed in 
the reserves that year. 

PERMITS ISSUED AND SHEEP COVERED THEREBY. 





1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


Reserve. 


Per- 
mits. 


Sheep. 


Per- 
mits. 


Sheep. 


Per- 
mits. 


Sheep. 


Per- 
mits. 


Sheep. 




57 


176, 485 


73 


147, 080 


36 


100, 000 


30 
4 

24 


100, 000 
a 3, 200 






24 


124, 800 


22 


99,000 


23 

2 

35 

23 


100, 000 

2, 150 

118, 730 

39, 189 


100, 000 






30 


134, 320 


44 


170, 203 


35 
34 
30 
22 
17 

289 
27 
70 
4 
4 
11 
63 
11 
15 
72 
71 

blO 


149, 850 
39, 907 

75, 000 




























30, 000 
















33, 950 

299,971 

30, 000 
































87 


188, 050 


117 


200,000 


71 


124, 950 


124, 995 




33, 000 












5 
10 
61 
12 
15 
58 
68 
14 


25, 000 

50,000 

186,800 

24, 850 

40, 000 

443,900 

157, 006 

19, 992 


20, 000 

49, 800 

196, 500 

25, 000 














44 
54 


166, 050 47 


188,800 
149, 964 




150, 000 


78 




40,000 
281, 550 












Mount Rainier 


89 
6 


249, 713 
25, 000 


95 

8 


171, 466 
25,000 


153, 999 


Washington 


20, 000 






Total 


391 


1,214,418 


484 


1,151,513 


433 


1, 432, 567 


843 


1, 806, 722 







a Goats. 

b Also 16 permits for 38,100 head, to be delivered only in case the range is found to be as represented 
by sheep owners. Upon examination of the range it was decided that these permits should not 
become operative during the season of 1904. 

The following table shows the reserves across which sheep were 
allowed to trail, under paragraph 23 of the circular of May 22, 1903, in 
going to grazing grounds or shipping points outside of the reserves, 
and the number of sheep so crossing, during the last half of the cal- 
endar year 1903 and the first half of the calendar year 1901. 

SHEEP-CROSSING PERMITS. 



Reserve. 


State or Territory. 


July 1 to Dec. 31, 
1903. 


Jan. 1 to June 30, 
1904. 




Permits. 


Sheep. 


Permits. 


Sheep. 






52 

19 



12 

a 30 


185, 965 

59, 800 



30, 580 

79,400 


57 
8 
2 

23 


178,950 
42, 150 




do... 




California 

do 


6,400 
72, 640 
83, 600 




Sierra 


...do 


30 


Madison 




1 

1 





1,800 

1,900 




Gila River 

Cascade Range 


New Mexico 




3 

1 

32 




9,600 

5,700 

160, 630 


Mount Rainier 

Big Horn 


Washington 

Wyoming 












Total 


149 531 . 675 


122 


387,440 









a Also 6 permits issued by the Department allowing 16,100 sheep to be taken to 42, 608 acres of private 
lands within the reserve. 



CATTLE AND HORSE GRAZING IN FOREST RESERVES. 

The following table shows the number of permits issued to graze 
cattle and horses in the forest reserves during the grazing seasons, and 
the number of stock covered thereby, for each of the years 1901 to 
1901, inclusive: 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 303 

Cattle and horse grazing in forest reserves. 





1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


Reserve. 


Per- 
mits. 


Stock. 


Per- 
mits. 


Stock. 


Per- 
mits. 


Stock. 


Per- 
mits. 


Stock. 


Arizona: 


99 


18, 222 


130 


27, 926 


190 
26 
26 
10 
16 

106 
4 
15 

16 

385 

62 

21 

17 

a 128 

5 


29, 293 

4,533 

7, 305 

1,593 

932 

20, 000 
1,455 
3, 742 

1,937 
50, 006 
9,525 

2,292 
484 

6,960 
681 


206 
29 
32 
27 
18 
93 
6 
17 

16 

414 

57 

20 


29, 576 




4,000 




15 


1,021 


15 


6,483 


9,085 




3,341 




12 
110 


320 
14,675 


16 
103 


614 

17,985 


1,024 


San Francisco Mountains 


23,644 
1,480 












6,364 


California, north: 


13 

180 

39 

18 
25 
a 32 
16 
4 

149 
16 
43 


1,985 

25, 865 

7,295 

3,045 

397 
1,019 
1,080 

210 

46, 996 
1,420 
3,915 


19 

268 

57 

14 
19 
a 135 
23 
10 

167 
22 
33 


2,071 
35, 667 
10, 406 

2, 024 

461 

6, 395 

1,441 

320 

48, 973 
2, 806 
3,652 


1,580 




45, 289 




7,998 
2.330 


California, south. 




19 1 542 




150 ' 7,338 




20 i 1,747 




15 527 


Colorado: 


263 

30 

44 

6 

44 

223 

3 
16 


47, 571 

3,112 

3, 858 

565 

8,120 

49, 740 

580 
402 


388 50,137 




33 2. 990 


PI urn Creek 


48 

12 

85 

234 

19 

19 
40 

17 
11 
46 
89 
52 
107 

148 
52 

226 





(c) 


3, 628 
723 


South Platte 


82 
154 


13, 808 
42, 303 


69 

215 

22 
15 


11,505 
47, 669 

998 

335 


11,696 


White River 


48, 838 


Idaho: 


1,067 


Priest River (Idaho and Wash- 






443 








482 


Montana: 


1 
3 


400 
145 


10 


442 
100 


5 

5 


375 
374 


951 




579 




951 




6 91 


6,988 


6107 


9,023 


6 84 
30 

87 

155 
41 
169 





10, 297 
3,184 
19, 743 

53, 662 

11, 258 

7,259 





11,356 


Little Belt Mountains 


5,323 












19, 959 


New Mexico: 


183 


45, 679 


140 


50,587 


55, 015 


Lincoln 


10, 566 




147 





4,602 





97 





5,461 





7,475 



Oregon: 

Ashland 


Bull Run 











12 


1,545 


31 

14 

316 


4,600 
3,915 
13, 293 


96 
34 

448 


10, 429 

3,307 

18, 399 


124 


1 1 . 691 


Oklahoma: 


43 2. 995 


South Dakota: 

Black Hills 


166 


6,996 


430 


18, 087 


Utah: 




Fish Lake 


5 


374 


16 


1,000 


33 


1,000 


67 
54 
71 
690 
153 
(«) 
218 

332 


3,610 


Grantsville 


2,627 


Logan 














5,000 
















19,419 












85 


3,343 


5, 500 


Salt Lake City 










Uintah 


60 

123 


4,320 
14, 984 


119 

182 
13 


9,912 

20, 012 
637 


181 

271 

(d) 

35 

391 

199 
41 
75 


9,934 
25, 497 


14, 198 


Wyoming: 

Big Horn 


39, 788 


Crow Creek 




Medicine Bow 






7,483 
79, 013 

7,317 

643 

2,770 


49 
495 

182 
30 
91 


9,000 




e32 

94 
2 


1, 954 

5,929 

129 


e38 

158 

7 

39 


2,387 

6,494 
210 

1,748 


86, 827 


Washington: 

Mount Rainier 


7,441 




419 


Washington 


4,076 










Total 


1,926 


277, 621 


2,642 


357, 552 


4, 121 


529, 973 


5,874 


620, 657 



a Pine Mountain and Zaca Lake and Santa Ynez reserves prior to 1904. 

b Flathead and Lewis and Clarke reserves prior to 1904. 

o Allowed informally during season of 1904. 

d Reserve transferred to War Department in 1903. 

e Old Teton Reserve. 



304 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



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170—04 20 



306 KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



FREE USE OF TIMBER. 



The demand during* the past year for the free use of forest-reserve 
timber, under the provisions of law and the Department rules and 
regulations prescribed thereunder, has been more than one-third 
greater than in the previous } 7 ear. The quarterly reports of the forest 
officers show 3,2H5 applications received during the fiscal year 1904, 
while the reports for the fiscal year 1903 showed 2,221 applications. 

Three thousand two hundred and thirty-nine applications have been 
approved and permits issued by the forest officers and the Department. 

Statement in detail respecting the applications received during the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1904, for the free use of forest-reserve timber. 



Name of reserve. 



Number 
of applica- 
tions. 



Amount of timber granted. 



Living timber. 



if 



Dead timber. 






Total. 



Arizona: 

Black Mesa 

Chiricahua 

Grand Canyon 

Mount Graham 

Prescott 

San Francisco Moun- 
tains 

California: 

Santa Barbara 

San Bernardino 

Santa Rita 

Sierra 

Colorado: 

Battlement Mesa 

Pike's Peak 

San Isabel 

South Platte 

White River 

Idaho and Montana: 

Bitter Root 

Idaho and Washington: 

Priest River 

Montana: 

Gallatin 

Highwood Mountains. 

Lewis and Clarke 

Little Belt Mountains. 

Madison 

New Mexico: 

Gila River 

Lincoln 

Pecos River 

Oregon : 

Ashland 

Cascade Range 

South Dakota: 

Black Hills 

Utah: 

Aquarius 

Fish Lake 

Logan 

Manti 

Payson 

Uintah 

Washington: 

Mount Rainier 

Olympic 

Washington 

Wyoming: 

Big Horn 

Medicine Bow 

Wyoming and Montana: 

Yellowstone 



27 
1 

1 
24 

58 

20 

10 

13 

2 

151 

109 

11 

5 

50 

115 

27 



5 
12 
102 
26 
54 



34 
2 

18 
35 

795 

50 

8 

54 

145 

97 

48 

10 

2 

50 

94 
95 

897 



10 

13 

2 

149 

108 

11 

5 

50 

115 

26 

1 



12 

102 
26 
54 

7 

33 

2 

18 
35 

788 

50 

8 

54 

145 

97 

48 



106, 400 



55, 169 



161,569 



116 



2, 918 
1,445 



1,500 



192 
6, 000 



I 2,918 

! 1, 637 

337 I 6,000 



1,500 



4,800 
954 



2 
399 



•jo 



174, 270 



4,800 
19, 100 



17 
250 



38, 000 
400, 131 



3, 500 



8, 500 
10,000 
10, 000 

1,800 
39, 410 

21, 000 

9,032 
14, 000 



300 
312, 000 



4 
302 



36, 310 

"i"5o6 



55, 100 
59, 610 
60, 000 



4,100 
170, 452 



22S 
70 



11 



56, 126 
226, 090 



44,090 
4,300 



37, 000 



235, 707 
32, 000 
89, 677 



46 

22 

1,188 

500 

216 

96 

1,112 

973 

206 



19 

80 

4, 643 

447 

780 



369 
30 

19 
455 

9,835 

614 
67 
268 
459 
1, 082 
483 



4,800 
175, 224 



38, 000 
404, 931 



22,600 



10 

2 ! 

46 | 36,950 



46 
126 



3,031 



9,000 
116, 000 



99, 870 
431, 090 



1, 256, 323 



169 



434 

792 



13, 599 



Total 3, 265 



239 2,137,038 



5, 002 



3,627,645 



48, 649 



8,500 

10, 300 

322, 000 

1,800 
75, 720 

21,000 
10, 532 
14, 000 



111,226 
285, 700 

104, 090 
4,300 
4,100 

406, 159 
32, 000 

126, 677 



9,000 
152, 950 

99, 870 
431, 090 

2,714,490 



56 
386 

124 

92 

46 

24 

1,587 

520 

216 

96 

1, 112 

990 

456 



48 
135 

4,643 
451 

1,082 

30 

401 

30 

247 
525 

9,879 

'641 
68 
277 
507 
1,082 
483 



120 
''295' 



434 

9,792 



$261. 61 

7.50 

2.95 

47.91 

105. 00 

124. 15 

54.99 

46.00 

25. 60 

1, 676. 53 

942. 70 

155. 15 

28.50 

303. 19 

1,070.76 

236. 80 

1.25 

78.25 

180. 50 

1,489.15 

261.05 

644. 29 

58.00 
143. 77 
21.50 

127. 40 
347. 73 



565. 33 
32. 90 
97.90 
595. 14 
479. 25 
258. 19 

52. 50 

31.00 

245. 92 

407. 49 
1,038.03 



16,630 7,738.67 



5, 764, 683 



53, 569 23, 140. 38 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 307 



SALE OF TIMBER WITHIN FOREST RESERVES. 

Three hundred and seventy petitions for sale of timber from lands 
in forest reserves have been presented, involving 69,257,710 feet 
(board measure) and 87,032 cords of wood. 

One hundred and eighteen petitions were pending before the Office 
at the date of last report. 

Three hundred and seventy-seven sales have been effected, and of 
the proceeds thereof and of previous sales in which there were 
deferred payments there have been realized and paid into the Treasury 
of the United States $58,436.19. 

Statement in detail of the number of petitions for the sale of timber from forest reserves during 
the fiscal year ended JuneSO, 1904, the quantity of timber desired, the number of sales ordered, 
quantity of timber offered, number of sales effected, and amount of proceeds from sales. 





Number of 
petitions. 


Timber stated in 
petitions. 


•6 

o> 
t. 

CD 

"g 

O 

CO 

CD 

CO 


Timber offered. 


d 

CD 

CD 
CD 

sp 

CD 

cc 
CD 

"3 

CO 




Xi 


" r 


Name of forest reserve. 


1 

bo 
P 

<& 

P 
cd 

Oh 


>Ȥ 

be" 
Po 
"C M 

8"g 


O 


cq* 

CD 
CD 


O 
O 


I? 
PQ 

CD 
CD 





® 
03 

m 

B 


CD 

'5 

CD 

P4 


IS 
u 



-a . 

V = 

B-S 

P 
O 


ydo 
C S 

bJDo* 

Geo 

"3 2 

c s 

CD P 
Ph^-5 

2 P* 

■a, js 


Arizona: 

Black Mesa 

Chiricahua 


1 
2 
3 
2 
29 

2 


2 

"2 

3 
41 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

12 
6 

12 
5 

14 

1 
15 

9 
7 
3 

16 
6 
2 

2 

7 

133 

4 
16 
11 

ii" 

5 
2 

18 


3 
2 
5 
5 
70 

3 
1 

2 
1 
4 

14 

8 
21 

8 

22 
1 

4 
17 

10 
10 
3 

22 
6 
6 

9 


580, 000 




2 


280, 000 




I 


$385. 00 

930. 00 

110. 00 

705. 00 

2, 811. 97 

36.00 




1 






400 
'7,' 665" 


2 

2 

39 




400 


9 


.... 

1 


2 


Mount Graham 


2, 148, 000 
454,000 

1,500,000 


2, 050, 666 

429, 000 


2 

5, 615 65 


2 
5 


San Francisco 
Mountains 




1 


1 




100 

250 

'"'466" 

15, 439 

116 

1,039 

580 


1 




100 


1 


California: 

San Bernardino 


1 


250, 000 

600, 000 

2, 000, 000 

532, 000 








2 






1 
1 

10 
3 

10 
5 

11 


600, 000 
2, 000, 000 

457, 000 







1 




3 

2 
2 
9 
3 

8 
1 

3 
2 

1 
3 


400 | 2 

15,425 j 11 

83 3 

1,039 18 

| 5 

1,620 15 


1, 385. 46 

350. 33 

6.00 

476. 58 

800.28 

256. 26 


"2 
"l 

2 


9 


Colorado: 

Pike's Peak 


3 

s 


South Platte 

White River 

Idaho: 

Bitter Root 


50, 000 
1,045,000 

83,000 


50, 000 
1,045,000 

33, 000 


3 
2 

5 






1 




Montana: 

Bitter Root 


5,000 
1,280,000 

50, 000 
261, 000 
765, 000 

724, 000 
16, 100 

175, 000 


4 
6,179 

2,565 
1,072 
6, 320 

6,487 
420 

250 
100 

21,533 

80 












4 


Lewis and Clarke.. 
Little Belt Moun- 


16 

9 

7 
3 

13 
1 
1 

2 
8 

133 

3 


1,028,000 

50, 000 
261,000 
765, 000 

628, 000 


6,196 

2,565 
1,072 
6, 320 

6, 518 
100 

250 
100 

21,278 

50 
98 
100 


15 

7 
8 
2 

12 
1 
3 

1 

8 

141 

3 
14 
10 


663. 08 

88.00 
984. 03 
92.00 

803.50 


2 

""i" 
1 


3 




1 




1 


New Mexico: 


6 


9 




5 


Pecos River 

Oregon: 


4 


100, 000 


100. 00 

50.00 
1,005.75 

37,753.81 

13.34 
1,019.00 
3, 264. 74 


1 
1 

3 

.... 


2 


Cascade Range 

South Dakota: 

Black Hills 

Utah: 

Aquarius 


5 
16 


12 

149 

4 


1,444,000 

10, 000, 279 

60, 000 


1, 564, 000 

10,000,279 

60, 000 
1,089,000 
3, 957, 000 


4 
5 

1 


Manti 




16 

13 

1 

1 


1,116,000 
7, 782, 000 


163 14 


?. 




2 

1 
1 
3 

2 
• 1 


100 


8 


?, 


Washington: 


1 














1 
8 

6 
1 
6 








Washington 

Wyoming: 


14 

7 


195, 000 
1 . 500. 000 


1,060 

50 

14,660" 


10 


1,695,000 

1 . 000. 000 


1,034 

50 

"5*660" 


400. 23 

537. 50 

3, 333. 33 

75. 00 


.... 


6 

1 


Medicine Bow 

Yellowstone 


3 13,333,332 

18 21.308.999 


2 ;i3,333,332 
14 5,243,666 


2 
11 






' 






Total 


118 


370 488 Ifi9.2fi7.710 


87, 032 


336 147.970.277 


76,063 377 


58,436.19 


20 


91 

























308 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 
SELECTIONS IN LIEU OF LANDS WITHIN FOREST RESERVES. 

The following- tables exhibit the progress of the work during the 
year ending June 30, 1904, in the adjustment of selections made in 
lieu of patented lands and unperfected claims within forest reserves, 
under acts of June 4, 1897 (30 Stat., 36), and June 6, 1900 (31 Stat., 
614): 

PERFECTED CASES. 



Items. 



Pending June 30, 1903 

Received during year ending June 30, 1904. 



Total 



Approved for patent during year ending June 30, 1904 , 
Rejected during year ending June 30, 1904 



Total cases finally disposed of during the vear. 
Total pending June 30, 1904 



Approved by Commissioner, but not for patent (unsurveyed) 

Hearing ordered in 

To Secretary on appeal 

Cases suspended under various orders or awaiting additional proof called for . 
On which no action has been taken 



Total . 



Cases. 



5,404 
3, 256 



8, €»ti0 



910 

134 



3,044 
5,616 



204 

29 

92 

2,841 

2, 450 



5,616 



Areas. 



Acres. 
1, 263, 236. 93 
466, 623. 80 



1,729,860.73 



578, 793. 20 
23, 040. 10 



601, 833. 30 
1,128,027.43 



784, 856. 17 
343,171.26 



1, 128, 027. 43 



Acres. 

Average acreage of selections approved for patent 195. 46 

Average acreage of selections rejected 171. 90 

UNPERFECTED CASES. 



Items. 


Cases. 


Areas. 


Received up to June 30, 1903 


35 


Acres. 
5, 752. 02 








3 

7 


480. 00 


Rejected up to June 30, 1903 


1, 123. 76 






Total 


10 


1, 603. 76 






Pending June 30, 1903 


25 
11 


4, 148. 26 


Received during year ending June 30, 1904 


1,711.82 






Total 


36 


5, 860. 08 




Approved for patent during year ending June 30, 1904 


11 

5 


1, 769. 00 


Rej ected during vear ending June 30, 1904 


800. 00 






Total 


16 


2, 569. 00 






Cases pending Januarv 30, 1904 


20 


3, 291. 08 






Approved bv Commissioner, but not for patent 


3 

17 


440. 00 


Cases suspended awaiting additional evidence, called for reports from forest 


2, 851. 08 






Total 


20 


3,291.08 







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 309 
MISCELLANEOUS CASES AND APPEALS. 

In connection with such selections there have been received, dock- 
eted, and acted upon, mainly during the year ending June 30, 1904, 
appeals, and contested and miscellaneous cases, as follows: 

Cases. 

Received and docketed 538 

Acted upon and finally closed 314 

Acted upon, but not yet closed 49 

Awaiting action 175 

538 

The work on these selections, appeals, etc., during the year involved 
the preparation and dispatch of 19,999 letters and decisions, covering 
31,565 pages. 

All selections received at this Office prior to November 1, 1903, 
except only cases held under orders of suspension, have been examined 
and either approved or rejected, or are awaiting receipt of additional 
evidence called for. 

The following tables present a general summary of all selections 
received under said acts, in lieu of both patented lands and unperfected 
claims, up to June 30, 1904, with the acreage of land selected and 
the action had thereon: 

PERFECTED CASES. 



- 


Cases. 


Areas. 




10, 853 


Acres. 
2, 287, 746. 92 










4,502 
735 


1, 028, 363. 36 
131, 356. 13 










Total cases disposed of 


5,237 


1,159,719.49 








Pending 


5,616 


1,128,027.43 




UNPERFECTED CASES. 




Cases. 


Areas. 


Received 


46 


Acres. 
7, 463. 84 






Approved for patent 


14 

12 


2, 249. 00 
1,923.76 


Rejected 








Total cases disposed of 


26 


4, 172. 76 








Cases pending 


20 


3,291.08 







310 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Appendix. 
PRESERVATION OF HISTORIC AND PREHISTORIC RUINS. 

Washington, D. C, September 3, 1904. 

Deak Sir: I beg leave to hand you herewith a memorandum relative to the his- 
toric and prehistoric ruins of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah. 

In line with our correspondence in recent years concerning the archaeology of the 
proposed Pajarito Cliff Dwellers' National Park, I have endeavored to secure like 
information of all the districts of the Southwest that are rich in prehistoric remains. 
These data have been compiled on the authority of our most reliable investigators, 
who have spent much time in the scientific study of these ruins. I refer especially 
to Dr. J. Walter Fewkes, of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Dr. Walter Hough, 
of the National Museum, and Mr. A. F. Bandelier, of the American Museum of Natu- 
ral History. I have traversed a great part of this ground myself, but above my own 
observations I place the authority of these experts. I have also availed myself of 
the excellent reports of Mr. S. J. Holsinger, who has given much thought to this 
question. 

I believe that in what is said relative to the necessity for speedy action looking 
toward the preservation of these ruins I reflect the sentiment of all who have seriously 
thought of this subject. I can testify to the general appreciation of the excellent 
work of your office in this matter in recent years. 

I beg leave to remain, with sincere respect, 
Very truly, yours, 

Edgar L. Hewett. 

The Commissioner of the General Land Office, 

Washington, D. C. 



Memorandum Concerning the Historic and Prehistoric Ruins of Arizona, New 
Mexico, Colorado, and Utah and Their Preservation. 

The importance of the large number of historic and prehistoric ruins scattered over 
the semiarid region of the southwestern part of the United States has gradually come 
to be recognized. Every cliff dwelling, every prehistoric tower, communal house, 
shrine and burial mound is an object which can contribute something to the 
advancement of knowledge, and hence is worthy of preservation. Knowledge of the 
extent, location and nature of these ruins has been accumulating for many years. 
We now know them to be very numerous and of great value. 

The question of the preservation of this vast treasury of information relative to our 
prehistoric tribes has come to be a matter of much concern to the American people. 
Fortunately, there seems to be no barrier to the speedy accomplishment of this. By 
the prompt exercise of the authority lodged in various branches of the Interior 
Department, the preservation of the ruins is assured. I shall endeavor to show that 
there is urgent need for the immediate exercise of this authority. This done, the 
work of legislation to the end that these regions may be made a perpetual source of 
education and enjoyment for the American people, as well as for travelers from foreign 
lands, may proceed with the careful deliberation which the subject demands. 

Unquestionably, some of these regions are sufficiently rich in historic and scientific 
interest and scenic beauty to warrant their organization into permanent national 
parks. Many others should be temporarily withdrawn and allowed to revert to the 
public domain after the ruins thereon have been examined by competent authority, 
the collections therefrom properly cared for, and all data that can be secured made 
a matter of permanent record. General legislation providing for the creation and 
administration of such parks and providing for the excavation of ruins in the inter- 
est of science only is urgently needed. It is well known that during recent years 
an extensive traffic has arisen in relics from these ruins. In securing these, build- 
ings, mounds, etc., have been destroyed. These relics are priceless when secured by 
proper scientific methods and of comparatively little value when scattered about either 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 311 

in museums or private collections without accompanying records. No scientific man 
is true to the highest ideals of science who does not protest against this outrageous 
traffic, and it will be a lasting reproach upon our Government if it does not use its 
power to restrain it. 

With a view to furnishing concise information upon which preservative measures 
may be based, I have compiled the accompanying map, showing by geographical dis- 
tricts the location of the most important ruins in the pueblo region. My sources of 
information have been both official and unofficial, and the work is based upon the 
highest authority obtainable. However, the map is not intended to be mathemat- 
ically correct. It will show, approximately, the location of important ruins. Some 
may have entirely disappeared since the maps were made from which this compila- 
tion is made, and more recent surveys might require important modifications. It may 
serve as a beginning for something more exact and more complete. I have prepared 
to accompany this a memorandum concerning the ruins located on each district, and 
have taken the liberty to point out how adequate protection may be afforded such as 
are on the public domain. 

Reference to the accompanying map will show at a glance that the distribution of 
the prehistoric tribes of the Southwest was determined by the drainage system. The 
great basins of the Rio Grande, the San Juan, the Little Colorado, and the Gila, con- 
stitute the four great seats of prehistoric culture of the so-called pueblo region. The 
remains of this ancient culture are scattered extensively over these four areas, and it 
is not to be hoped nor would it be a service to science to attempt to preserve all these 
remains. They are of the three great types, pueblo ruins, cliff houses, and cavate 
dwellings, with their accompanying burial mounds, kivas, shrines, etc., and are 
practically innumerable. All measures for their preservation should look toward 
the encouragement of research and the advancement of knowledge, and not toward 
its restriction. I am of the opinion that if the principal groups or districts of ruins 
of each great culture area can be protected by the Department of the Interior and no 
excavation permitted thereon except by responsible parties bearing proper permis- 
sion from the Department, the highest interests of the people will be upheld. 

I have shown on the accompanying map that the majority of the ruins of the four 
great basins are embraced in twenty districts. The circles on the map are not 
intended to fix absolutely the boundaries of these districts; they are merely intended 
to show, approximately, how the ruins may be grouped for convenience and reference. 

The districts are grouped as follows: 

I. The Rio Grande Basin. 

1. The Pajarito Park district. 

2. The Pecos Pueblo district. 

3. The Gran Quivira district. 

4. The Jemez district. 

5. The Acoma district. 
II. The San Juan Basin. 

1. The Aztec district. 

2. The Mesa Verde district. 

3. The Chaco Canyon district. 

4. The Canvon de Chelly district. 

5. The Bluff district. 

III. The Little Colorado Basin. 

1. The Tusayan district. 

2. The Flagstaff district. 

3. The Holbrook district. 

4. The Zuili district. 

IV. The Gila Basin. 

1. The Rio Verde district. 

2. The San Carlos district, 

3. The Lower Gila district, 

4. The Middle Gila district. 

5. The Upper Gila district. 

6. The San Francisco River district. 

Following is a brief memorandum showing the nature, extent, and condition of 
the ruins on each district. 

I. THE RIO GRANDE BASIN. 

This culture area, lying wholly in New Mexico, embraces the Rio Grande Valley 
with its tributaries from Ojo Caliente on the north, to Socorro on the south, and 
from Acoma on the west, to the plains east of the Manzano Mountains. 

1. The Pajarito Park district, — This district lies between the Rio Grande on the 



312 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

east, and the Jemez Mountains on the west, and extends from Ojo Caliente on the 
north to Cochiti on the south. In the northern part are the ruins of Homayo, 
Houiri (Ho-we-re), and Pose on Ojo Caliente Creek. Ten miles west, below El Rito, 
is the large ruin of Sepawi (Se-paw-we). Near the village of Abiquiu on the Rio 
Chama is the important ruin of Tsiwari (Tsi-wa-re). These are all pueblo ruins and 
not well preserved. 

The central portion of the district is the Pajarito Park proper, the region that has 
for some years been under withdrawal by the General Land Office, and favorably 
reported on for a national park for which it has many advantages, being of great 
scenic beauty, accessible, and one of the richest in the Southwest in well-preserved 
prehistoric remains. It contains innumerable cavate houses, a vast number of small 
pueblo ruins, and the ruins of the great communal dwellings of Puye, Otowi, Tsan- 
kiwi (Tsan-ke-we), Navakwi (Nav-a-kvve), and Pajarito or Tchrega. Vandalism has 
greatly diminished among these ruins since the park has been under withdrawal. 

In the southern part of this district, between the Rito de los Frijoles and Cochiti, 
are the ruins of six pueblos and a considerable number of cavate houses, the interest- 
ing Cueva Pintada (painted cave), and the famous shrines known as the Stone Lions 
of Potrero de las Vacas and Potrero do los Idolos. 

2. The Pecos district. — The principal ruins of this district are those of the old pueblo 
of Pecos on the abandoned Pecos pueblo grant. These are very important ruins, 
consisting of the two large communal houses and the remains of the old mission 
church, the first mission founded on the soil of the United States. * These are the 
only ones of the numerous ruins in the upper Pecos Valley that can be preserved. 
All others are well nigh obliterated. 

3. The Gran Quivira district. — These interesting ruins lie on the plains east of the 
Manzano Mountains. The principal ones are those of Tabira (Gran Quivira), Abo, 
and Cuaray. All are pueblo ruins of the historic epoch and at each place are the 
ruins of interesting mission churches. The ruins of this district should be officially 
investigated. 

4. The Jemez district. — The ruins of 17 ancient pueblos are recorded as being 
located in the Jemez Valley north of Jemez pueblo. Most of them have not been 
accurately located. Such of them as are still preserved and on public lands are 
within the limits of the proposed Jemez Forest Reserve, now temporarily withdrawn. 
The most important ruins in the district are those of the old pueblo of Ginsewa. 
They lie 12 miles north of Jemez pueblo and include the ruins of the stately old mis- 
sion church of San Diego de Jemez, built early in the seventeenth century, the sec- 
ond oldest mission church on the soil of the United States. An investigation of this 
district is needed. 

5. The Acoma district. — A large number of valuable pueblo ruins are scattered over 
this district to the south and southwest of the pueblo of Acoma, and southeast to 
the neighborhood of Magdalena. Many others of lesser importance are to the north 
and west. It is a region of great interest, the pueblo of Acoma itself being one of 
the most interesting objects in the Southwest. Nearby it is the famous Mesa Encan- 
tada. Unfortunately there has been but little investigation of this district, so that 
we have no important accounts of its ruins. It is a district that is greatly in need of 
official examination. 

II. THE SAN JUAN BASIN. 

The ruins of the San Juan Basin consist of both large and small communal houses 
and true cliff dwellings in great numbers. They are scattered in numerous, irregular 
groups over the contiguous portions of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Arizona. 
All the ruins of the San Juan and its tributaries have suffered much from destructive 
collectors. 

1. The Aztec district. — The most important ruins on this district are the group of large 
communal dwellings near Aztec, N. Mex. They are on private lands and well cared 
for, their owner apparently appreciating their value. Numerous other pueblo ruins 
exist in the district, but it is doubtful if any are so situated as to permit of their pro- 
tection by the Government. 

2. The Mesa Verde district. — In this district are the finest specimens of true cliff 
dwellings. They are very numerous in the canyons of Mesa Verde and along the Mancos 
River. Cliff Palace is justly one of the most; famous works of prehistoric man in 
existence. Numerous pueblo and cliff ruins are distributed along the McElmo, the 
Yellowjacket and the Hovenweep. On the whole, this is one ot the most interesting of 
all prehistoric districts. A portion of it is under withdrawal by the General Land 
Office, pending the creation of the Colorado Cliff Dwellings National Park. The 
intelligent interest of the people of Colorado has done much toward the preservation 
of these ruins. However, the entire district has suffered much from vandalism, a 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 313 

majorityof the burial mounds having been destroyed. A national park in this region 
would be of great educational value. 

3. The Chaco Canyon district. — This district embraces the great ruins of Pueblo 
Bonito, Pueblo Alto, Chettro Kettle, Hungo Pavie, Kin Kale, Una Vida, Wejegi, 
Kinbineola, Tuba Kin, Penasco Blanco, Kin Klizhin, Tala Kin, Kin Ya Ah, and Kin 
Ah Zin. 

Nowhere else is there such a splendid group of prehistoric buildings in a fair state 
of preservation. They have been made the subject of special investigation by the 
Hyde Exploring Expedition of New York under Dr. George H. Pepper. A splendid 
collection from this district is installed in the American Museum of Natural History 
in New York City. In due time we shall doubtless have a full report of this excel- 
lent piece of work. This district has also been made the subject of a special investi- 
gation by Mr. S. J. Holsinger, whose comprehensive manuscript report, with 
accompanying photographs, in the office of the Commissioner of the General Land 
Office, affords much valuable information. 

4. Canyon de Chelly district. — The ruins of this district are mostly in Canyon de 
Chelly and its tributary Canyon del Muerto, although many others are scattered 
along the lower Chinlee Valley. They are, for the most part, pueblo and cave 
ruins. They have been specially studied and reported on by Mr. Cosmos Mindeleff. 
A large collection of pottery from here has recently been acquired by the Brooklyn 
Institute of Science and Art. The preservation of these ruins has been made a 
matter of special care by the Secretary of the Interior. 

5. The Bluff district. — Comparatively little is known of the numerous ruins in 
southeastern Utah. They have been explored and the district mapped by Dr. T. 
Mitchell Prudden, of New York City, but as yet no close investigations have been 
undertaken. Ruins are very numerous along Montezuma Creek, Recapture Creek, 
Cottonwood Creek, Butler Wash, Comb Wash, and Grand Gulch. The caves of the 
Cottonwood and its tributaries have been investigated by the Hyde Exploring Expe- 
dition, and the collections therefrom placed in the American Museum of Natural 
History. These are important relics of ancient "basket makers." 

III. THE LITTLE COLORADO BASIN. 

This extensive region, embraced in the valley of the Little Colorado and its tribu- 
taries, is preeminently a region of pueblo ruins, though some cave dwellings are 
found. It is especially rich, in prehistoric pottery. Because of its wealth of relics 
this region has suffered more than any other from the traffic in prehistoric wares. 
However, we are fortunate in that Dr. J. Walter Fewkes, of the Bureau of American 
Ethnology, has made the districts of the Little Colorado a subject of research for 
many years. His voluminous reports on this region have put us in possession of a 
vast amount of information on the archaeology and ethnology of the Southwest. His 
collections from Sikyatki for the National Museum, made in 1895, with the assistance 
of Mr. F. W. Hodge, of the Smithsonian Institution, together with the collections 
made from the Holbrook district by Doctors Fewkes and Hough, form probably the 
most valuable collection of prehistoric pottery in existence. Another extensive col- 
lection of pottery from this region may be seen in the Field Columbian Museum in 
Chicago. 

1. The Tusayan district — The Hopi Plateau is a region of pueblo ruins. The build- 
ings are not well preserved, arid there are probably no ruins in the district that 
demand permanent preservation. It is, however, exceedingly important that they 
should be protected from further unauthorized excavation. There are many ruins 
on the northern part of this reservation that have not been explored. 

2. The Flagstaff district. — The important group of ruins in Walnut Canyon are good 
types of cliff dwellings. These have received special attention from the Secretary of 
the Interior. The group of pueblo ruins which lie from 5 to 15 miles northwest of 
Black Falls have been examined and reported on by Doctor Fewkes. He pronounces 
them among the most important in the Southwest. They are entirely without 
protection. 

3. The Holbrook district. — This is a region of numerous pueblo ruins, some of which 
have been examined and reported on by Doctors Fewkes and Hough. The Museum- 
Gates Expedition of 1901, Doctor Hough's report of which we now have, has 
advanced our knowledge of portions of this region very much. Doctor Hough has 
published particularly interesting information concerning the ruins in the Petrified 
Forest. The traffic in prehistoric wares from the Holbrook district has been deplor- 
ably active. Many thousands of pieces of excavated pottery have been shipped from 
Holbrook alone, and collections embracing several thousands of pieces are now in 
the hands of dealers at various towns in the district, and are offered for sale. These 



314 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

collections have been made, for the most part, by Indians and native Mexicans in 
the employ of traders, and are devoid of authentic records. The district is not rich 
in ruins that demand permanent protection, but it is in great need of temporary pro- 
tection, pending further serious investigation by competent parties. 

4. Tlie Zuni district. — This region is rich both in historic and prehistoric ruins. On 
Zuni Reservation are the ruins of the historic Seven Cities of Cibola. El Moro, or 
Inscription Rock, is an interesting historic monument east of Zuni, which is under 
temporary withdrawal by the General Land Office. The region south of Zuni to 
Quemado is known to be full of ruins, and traders are securing large collections of 
pottery therefrom at the present time. The ruins of Zuni have been thoroughly 
made known to us through the work of the Hemenway Expedition, under the direc- 
tion of the late Frank Hamilton Gushing, assisted by Mr. F. W. Hodge. The col- 
lections of this expedition are now in the Peabody Museum at Harvard University. 
Other important researches have been made in the Zuni district by Doctor Fewkes. 

IV. THE GILA BASIN. 

This is another region that embraces practically every species of prehistoric ruins. 
It is of vast extent and comprises, besides the valley of the Gila proper, the large 
valleys of the Salt and Verde rivers. As a seat of prehistoric culture it was one of the 
most extensive and populous. Many ruins of these three great valleys are on irri- 
gable lands, and, accordingly, have disappeared with the advancement of agriculture. 

1. The Rio Verde district. — On the northern tributaries of the Rio Verde are many 
cliff ruins. Of these, Honanki and Palatki are the most important. Thej^ are 
within the limits of the San Francisco Mountains Forest Reserve. There are numer- 
ous cliff ruins along Oak Creek and Beaver Creek and their tributaries. Near Camp 
Verde is the ruin known as "Montezuma Castle," and a little farther up Beaver 
Creek, on the Black Mesa Forest Reserve, is the interesting Montezuma Well. Mr. 
Mindeleff and Doctor Fewkes have made important studies and reports on the ruins 
of this district. 

2. The San Carlos district. — Of the ruins on this district we have very little infor- 
mation beyond that obtained by Mr. A. F. Bandelier, to whose indefatigable explo- 
ration we owe so much of our knowledge of the Southwest. Both pueblo and cliff 
ruins are known to exist in various parts of the district, almost all of which are situ- 
ated within the limits of the San Carlos Apache Reservation. Ruins are reported 
from near San Carlos, from various points along the' Upper Salt River, on White 
Mountain Creek, the Carrizzo, the Cibicu, and the Pinal. 

3. The Lower Gila district. — Many ruins of this district have disappeared during 
recent years because situated upon agricultural land. Our archaeological knowledge 
of the district is due, for the most part, to the Hemenway expedition under the late 
Mr. Cushing, to Mr. Mindeleff, and Doctor Fewkes. The famous Casa Grande ruin 
has, for several years, been under the care of the Government. The best collection 
from the district is that obtained by the Hemenway expedition. It is in the Pea- 
body Museum at Harvard University. 

4. The Middle Gila district. — The ruins of this part of the Gila Valley are mostly on 
agricultural lands, though many cliff ruins are known to exist in outlying districts. 
Pueblo ruins are very plentiful about Solomon vilie, but are not well preserved. The 
largest is that of Pueblo Viejo. Ruins are also numerous about Clifton, and along 
the Blue River. We have some reports on ruins of this district by Mr. Bandelier 
and Doctor Fewkes. There is need for further investigation and report as to the 
present condition of these ruins. 

5. The Upper Gila district. — It is known that there are many ruins on the Upper 
Gila and its tributaries near Fort Bayard, the Mimbres, and near Silver City. They 
are almost entirely within the Gila River Forest Reserve. These rums should be 
officially investigated and reported on, as we have very meager information con- 
cerning them. 

6. The San Francisco River district. — TheupperSan Francisco Valley and its tributaries, 
especially the Tularosa, is full of cliff and pueblo ruins. It is almost entirely within 
the Gila River Forest Reserve. Much of it is almost unknown country. It is in great 
need of further exploration. While we know of its almost innumerable ruins, we have 
no reports on them. The first archaeological work to be done here was that of Doctor 
Hough, of the National Museum, who made an expedition into this district during 
the past summer. Doctor Hough's report will doubtless give us much interesting 
information concerning the archaeology of this little known district. 

With the generous assistance of Dr. Walter Hough, I have prepared a brief 
bibliography relative to the ruins in these various districts. No attempt has been 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 315 

made to make this complete. Many valuable works are omitted. The purpose of it 
is to direct anyone seeking information on this subject to some literature thereon. 
Reference to this bibliography, hereto attached, will enable anyone to secure con- 
siderable information concerning ruins, or groups of ruins, that have been examined 
and reported on. 
In conclusion, I would respectfully submit the following recommendations: 

1. That the authority of the Department of the Interior should be immediately 
exercised to protect all ruins on the public domain. 

2. That the Interior Department should prohibit the collecting of prehistoric 
objects from public lands and Indian reservations by any person not duly furnished 
with a permit from the Secretary of the Interior. 

3. That custodians or inspectors under the direction of the General Land Office are 
needed to protect the ruins in the following districts: 

(a) The Pajarito Park district, New Mexico. 

(b) The Chaco Canyon district, New Mexico. 

(c) The Mesa Verde district, Colorado. 

(d) The Bluff district, Utah. 

(e) The Holbrook district, Arizona. 

(f) The Zuni district, New Mexico. 

(g) The Rio Verde district, Arizona. 
(h) The Casa Grande district, Arizona. 
(i) The Acoma district, New Mexico. 
(j) The Middle Gila district, Arizona. 

(k) The Gran Quivira district, New Mexico. 

(I) The Jemez district, New Mexico. 

With the first seven districts there is urgent need for immediate action. The 
eighth is already provided for. The next four are important in the order named. 
It would appear from general report and from the literature thereon that they are 
all of sufficient importance to warrant protection by the Government. At any rate, 
they should be examined as early as possible by competent authority and reported 
upon with reference to the present condition, character, and extent of the ruins. 

4. That the Forestry Department, if furnished with adequate forces, could protect 
the ruins in the following districts, which lie within forest reserves, and that provision 
should be made for the same as early as possible: 

(a) The Flagstaff district, Arizona, including the important Black Falls group of 
ruins lying just above the northern boundary of the San Francisco Mountains Forest 
Reserve; also the ruins on the northern tributaries of the Rio Verde, lying within 
the same reserve, and also those on the Black Mesa Forest Reserve. 

(6) The San Francisco River district, New Mexico. 

(c) The Upper Gila district, New Mexico. 

5. That the cooperation of the Department of Indian Affairs is needed for the pro- 
tection of all ruins in the following districts: 

(a) The Pecos Pueblo district, New Mexico. 

(b) The Canyon de Chelly district, Arizona. 

(c) The Tusayan district, Arizona. 

(d) The San Carlos district, Arizona. 

(e) That part of the Zuni district, New Mexico, which lies within the Zuni Indian 
Reservation. 

6. That there is neither economy nor efficiency in the policy of employing a custo- 
dian for a single ruin. All the ruins of any district described herein can be efficiently 
protected by one or two custodians or inspectors of the grade of forest rangers, who 
should make it known by posted notices that the excavation of ruins without the 
permission of the Secretary of the Interior is forbidden, and who might also examine 
and report from time to time upon ruins within their districts which are in need of 
special attention. 

7. That the permanent withdrawal of tracts of land from the public domain for the 
purpose of protecting ruins thereon would seem to be unnecessary except where the 
ruins are of such character and extent as to warrant the creation of permanent 
national parks. 

8. That there is need for general legislation authorizing the creation of such 
national parks and providing for the excavation of prehistoric ruins in the interest 
of science only. 

I respectfully submit the above as a comprehensive plan for the preservation of 
all historic and prehistoric ruins upon the public domain and upon Indian reserva- 
tions, and invite your consideration of the same. As a working plan I have no 
doubt it is open to much criticism, but I believe it might be made the basis for an 
economical and efficient method of performing this public service. 



316 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

1. Pajarito Park district. 

(a) Bandelier, A. F. : Investigation among the Indians of the southwestern 

United States. Papers of the Arch. Inst, of America. Final Rep., 
Part II, 1892. 
(6) Id. The Delight Makers, 1890. 

(c) Hewett, Edgar L. : The Pajarito Park. Rep. of Gov. of New Mexico, 

1902. 

(d) Lummis, Chas. F.: The Land of Poco Tiempo, p. 133, 1893. 

(e) Mankin, James D. : Report on the Ancient Cliff Dwellings in New 

Mexico, and the Proposed Establishment of the Pajarito National 
Park; MS. 1899. Extracts, Rep. of Com. of General Land Office, 1900. 

2. The Pecos district. 

(a) Bandelier, A. F. : Rep. on the Ruins of the Pueblo of Pecos; Papers of 
the Arch. Inst, of America. American Series I, 1881. 

(b) Hewett, Edgar L. : Studies on the Extinct Pueblo of Pecos. Amer. 

Anthropologist, Sept., 1904. 

3. Gran Quivira district. 

(a) Bandelier, A. F.: Final Report, Part II, 1892. 

{b) Lummis, Chas. F.: The Land of Poco Tiempo, p. 285, 1893. 

4. Jemez district. * 

(a) Bandelier, A. F.: Final Report, Part II, 1892. 

(b) Lummis, Chas. F. : Some Strange Corners of Our Country, 1892. 

(c) Stevenson, Win. M. C: The Zia. 11th An. Rep. Bur. of Ethnology, 

1894. 

(a) Bandelier, A. F.: Final Report, Part I, 1890; also Part II, 1892. 

(b) Hodge, F. W.: The Verification of a Tradition. Amer. Anthropologist, 
1 ' Sept., 1897. 

(c) Id. Same subject. National Geographic Magazine, Oct., 1897; also 

Century Magazine, May, 1898. 

(d) Lummis, Chas. F. : Some Strange Corners of Our Country, 1892. 

6. Aztec district. 

(a) Morgan, Lewis H. : Houses and House Life of the American Aborigines. 

Contributions to N. A. Ethnology, Vol. IV, 1881. 

(b) Prudden, T. Mitchell; The Prehistoric Ruins of the San Juan Water- 

shed. Amer. Anthropologist, Apr.-June, 1903. 

7. Mesa Verde district. 

(a) Chapin, F. H.: The Land of the Cliff Dwellers, 1892. 

(6) Holmes, W. H. : Report on the Ancient Ruins of Southwestern Colorado. 

Hayden's U. S. Survey, 1876. 
{e) Nordenskiold, G. : The Cliff Dwellers of the Mesa Verde. Stockholm, 

1894. 
(d) Prudden, T. Mitchell; The Prehistoric Ruins of the San Juan Watershed. 

8. Chaco Canyon district. 

(a) Holsinger, S. J.; Report on the Prehistoric Ruin of Chaco Canyon, 

• N. M.; MSB., General Land Office, Washington. 
(6) Jackson, W. H.; In Hayden's Rep. on the Geological Survey of the 
Territories, 1876. 

(c) Morgan, Lewis H.; Houses and House Life of the American Aborigines; 

Contributions to N. A. Ethnology, Vol. IV. 

(d) Prudden, T. Mitchell; The Prehistoric Ruins of the San Juan Watershed. 

9. Canyon de Chelly district. 

{a) Mindeleff, Cosmos; The Cliff Ruins of Canyon de Chelly; 16th Annual 

Report of the Bureau of Ethnology, 1894. 
(6). Prudden, T. Mitchell ; The Prehistoric Ruins of the San Juan Watershed. 

10. Bluff district. 

(a) Chapin, F. H.; The Land of the Cliff Dweller, 1892. 

(6) Pepper, Geo. H.; The Ancient Basket Makers of Southwestern Utah; 

Sup. Amer. Mus. Jour., Vol. II, No. 4, 1902. 
(c) Prudden, T. Mitchell; The Prehistoric Ruins of the San Juan Watershed. 

11. The Tusayan district. 

(a) Fewkes, J. W. ; Archaeological Expedition to Arizona in 1895; 17th 

Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology, 1898. 

(b) Id.; Preliminary Account; Smithsonian Report, 1895. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 317 

11. The Tusayan district — Continued. 

(c) Hough, Walter; Archaeological Field Work in Northeastern Arizona; 

The Museum-Gates Expedition of 1901; National Museum Report, 
1901. 

(d) Mindeleff, Victor; Pueblo Architecture; 8th Annual Report of the 

Bureau of Ethnology, 1886. 

12. The Flagstaff district. 

(a) Fewkes, J. W. ; Pueblo Ruins near Flagstaff, Arizona; American 

Anthropologist, July-Sept., 1900. 

(b) Id.; Two Summers' Work in the Pueblo Ruins; 22d Annual Report of 

the Bureau of Ethnology, 1904. 

13. The Holbrook district. 

(a) Fewkes, J. W.; Preliminary Account of an Expedition to the Pueblo 

Ruins near Winslow, Arizona, in 1896; Smithsonian Report, 1896. 

(b) Id.; Two Summers' Work in the Pueblo Ruins. 

(e) Hough, Walter; Archaeological Field Work in Northeastern Arizona; 

The Museum-Gates Expedition, 1901; National Museum Report, 1901. 
(d) Id.; Ancient Peoples of the Petrified Forest of Arizona; Harper's Maga- 
zine, Nov., 1902. 

14. The Zufii district. 

(a) Fewkes, J. W. ; Reconnoissance of Ruins in or near the Zuiii Reserva- 

tion; Journal of American Ethnology and Archaeology, Vol. I. 

(b) Gushing, F. H.; Outlines of Zuni Creation Myths; 13th Annual Report 

of the Bureau of Ethnology, 1891. 

(c) Id.; Preliminary Notes; Report of the Congress of Americanists, Berlin, 

1890. 

(d) Bandelier, A. F. ; Historical Introduction; Archaeological Institute of 

America, 1881. 

(e) Id.; Investigations; same report, 1882. , 

(/) Id.; Historical Archives of the Hemen way Southwestern and Archaeo- 
logical Expedition; Report of the Congress of Americanists, Berlin, 
1890. 

(g) Id.; Documentary History of the Zuni Tribe; Journal of American 
Ethnologv and Archaeoiogv, Vol. Ill, 1892. 

(//) Id.; Final Report, Part II, 1892. 

(i) Winship, G. P.; The Coronado Expedition; 14th An. Report by the 
Bureau of Ethnology, Part II, 1892. 

(j) Hodge, F. W.; The First Discovered City of Cibola; American Anthro- 
pologist, Apr. 10, 1895. 

(k) Mindeleff, V.; A study of Pueblo Architecture; 8th An. Rep. Bur. of 
Ethnologv, 1891. 

15. The Rio Verde district. 

(a) Mindeleff, Cosmos; Aboriginal Remains in the Verde Valley; 13th 

Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology, 1891. 

(b) Fewkes, J. W.; Archaeological Expedition to Arizona in 1895; 17th 

Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology, 1898. 

(c) Mearns, E. A.; Ancient Ruins of the Rio Verde Valley; Popular Science 

Monthly, Oct., 1890. 

16. The San Carlos district. 

(a) Bandelier, A. F.; Final Report, Part II, 1892. 
(6) Hough, Walter; Museum-Gates Expedition, 1901. 

17. The Lower Gila district. 

(a) Fewkes, J. W. ; Report on Casa Grande; Journal of Amer. Ethnology 

and Archaeology, Vol. II. 
(6) Mindeleff, Cosmos; The Casa Grande Ruin; 13th Annual Report of the 

Bureau of Ethnology, 1891. 

(c) Bandelier, A. F. ; Final Report, Part II. 

(d) Cushing, F. H.; Preliminary Notes on the Hemenway Expedition; 

Report of Congress of Americanists, Berlin, 1890. 

(e) Hodge, F.W.; Prehistoric Irrigation in Arizona; Amer. Anthropologist, 

July, 1893. 

18. Middle Gila district. 

(a) Bandelier, A. F.; Final Report, Part II. 

(6) Fewkes, J. W.; Two Summers' Work in Pueblo Ruins. 

19. The Upper Gila district. 

Bandelier, A. F. ; Final Report, Part II. 

20. The San Francisco River district. 

Forthcoming Report by Dr. Walter Hough, National Museum. 



318 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Washington, D. C, September 14, 1904. 

Sir: My attention having been called to the various measures proposed for the 
protection and preservation of the historic and prehistoric ruins of the Southwest, I 
beg leave to submit some observations upon the subject. 

I have recently placed on tile with your Office a memorandum designed to embody 
in concise form the authentic information we have concerning these ruins. It seems 
evident that we are in possession of enough information on the subject to permit the 
formulation of a permanent, comprehensive, and efficient system of management for 
these ruins. It would seem that the demand for their protection and preservation 
must be recognized. My opinion is that some legislation should be had founding 
such a system of management and authorizing such procedure as will make for the 
conservation of these interests for the use and benefit of the public and the encour- 
agement of scientific research. I believe also that if all who are interested in the 
subject will take the trouble to inform themselves thoroughly it will be found that 
legislation may be so shaped as to secure the desired ends without detriment to the 
interests of any one. 

There are perhaps two or three tracts of considerable extent which should be 
made national parks, e. g., Pajarito Park, in New Mexico, and Mesa Verde Park, in 
Colorado. They embrace the leading types of prehistoric ruins in vast numbers. 
They are useless for agriculture or other industrial purposes. They are of such interest 
and scenic beauty as to attract much travel when made accessible. They would 
be a great source of information and education to the general public. Their organ- 
ization into national parks would be greatly to the benefit of the Indians on adjacent 
reservations, because of increasing the sale of Indian handiwork to tourists. Settlers 
near the parks would find them an added source of revenue. I do not see how there 
can be any objection by reasonable people to the creation of these national parks. 
Provision should be made for their establishment in the same manner that forest 
reserves are created. 

Then there are several isolated ruins and groups of ruins of great interest which 
demand permanent preservation, such as Montezuma Castle, on Beaver Creek, Arizona; 
the Cliff Dwellings, on Walnut Canyon, near Flagstaff, Ariz., and certain mission 
churches, as the one at the old Pueblo of Pecos, and the one near Jemez Pueblo, New 
Mexico, which are among the oldest landmarks on American soil. At the present 
time there are perhaps a dozen such interesting localities known and others may 
become known in the future. These could usually be protected by very small reser- 
vations. From 10 acres to a section of land would be sufficient in any case men- 
tioned. This could be effected without detriment to the rights of settlers or hin- 
drance to the development of the country. 

There are also vast numbers of isolated ruins, burial mounds, etc., on public lands 
and Indian reservations which should be preserved long enough for scientific investi- 
gation, and no longer. This can certainly be done without detriment to the rights 
of settlers. No large reservations of land are necessary for this purpose. I assume 
that the Secretary of the Interior already has full power to protect these ruins and to 
issue permits for their excavation. It would perhaps be well to more specifically 
declare by law his authority and duties with reference to their preservation and the 
issuance of permits to properly qualified persons to examine and excavate them in 
the interests of science only, and to stop the traffic in prehistoric wares from the 
public lands and Indian reservations which is now working such irreparable waste 
and loss. 

I should favor, and I believe the scientists and the country at large will favor, a 
simple measure authorizing the creation of national parks as mentioned above, the 
creation of the small reservations for the protection of the few isolated ruins or small 
groups of ruins that demand permanent protection, and the establishment of a sys- 
tem of supervision of all ruins on the public domain and Indian reservations by the 
Department of the Interior, all details of which should be left in the hands of the 
Secretary of the Interior to develop as information and experience direct. It seems 
to me that one section added to H. R. 13478, known as the Lacey bill, providing for 
the protection and utilization of ruins not included in such national parks as may be 
created under that act, would make it perfectly adequate to cover every condition 
expressed above and entirely satisfactory to all concerned. 

I do not wish to attempt at this time a review of all bills pending on this subject. 
I desire, however, to analyze briefly one measure which, with important amendments, 
was passed by the Senate April 26, 1904. I refer to S. 5603, in most respects identical 
with H. R. 13349. known as the Rodenberg bill. 

Section 1 of this bill provides that permits to examine and excavate ruins and col- 
lect antiquities from the public lands may be granted by the Secretary of the Interior 
to properly qualified persons, provided the work is undertaken for the benefit of some 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 319 

incorporated public museum, university, college, scientific society, or educational insti- 
tution. This would seem to bar the Bureau of American Ethnology, which exists for 
the sole purpose of doing archaeological and ethnological work in this country. It is 
not an incorporated institution. The section seems to confer no new authority and to 
impose an unfortunate restriction upon existing authority. 

Section 2 limits the power of the Secretary of the Interior to the withdrawal of a 
single section of land in one locality. To the existing power of temporary withdrawal, 
which the Secretary of the Interior has wisely used in the past, we owe the preserva- 
tion of the best of our remaining ruins. I refer particularly to Pajarito Park. This 
section seems to merely impose an unfortunate restriction upon existing powers. 

Section 3 makes it mandatory upon the Secretary of the Interior to grant permits 
to local institutions for the excavation of any ruin or site within the State or Terri- 
tory where such institution is located, on application indorsed by the governor of 
said State or Territory. This would make the rights on the public domain of all 
other parties, even of the Government of the United States, subordinate to those 
of the local authorities. 

Section 5 requires that the work of excavation on any given site, once begun, must 
be prosecuted continuously until finished. I fear that this provision is not based 
upon accurate knowledge of existing conditions. The complete excavation of certain 
of the ruins of the Southwest would be a matter of years and would cost thousands 
of dollars. None of our smaller institutions or scientific societies could undertake 
archaeological work under such conditions, and even those most liberally endowed 
would be in danger of forfeiture under the provisions of this section through failure 
of funds to complete a piece of work. The excavation of a single room is often 
highly important and advantageous. Teachers of archaeology with classes in the field 
should be permitted and encouraged to do small pieces of systematic work. The 
provisions of this section would drive them from the field. 

Section 6 provides that a complete photographic record shall be made of the prog- 
ress of excavations and of all objects of archaeological or historic value found therein, 
to be made in duplicate for the United States National Museum. Such photographs 
can be of no value unless sufficiently well made to serve for the illustration of reports. 
An expedition may collect 5,000 specimens in a summer's work. The cost of the 
photographs would probably exceed the whole cost of the expedition. It would act 
as serious restriction to archaeological w r ork. 

Section 8. The penal clause of this bill makes it a misdemeanor, punishable by fine 
or imprisonment, to participate in the gathering of archaeological objects of any kind 
on the public domain. The intent of this section is manifestly to restrain vandalism. 
Under strict construction it prohibits the most harmless and commendable pursuits. 
When construed as intended it will prohibit perfectly harmless collecting, such as 
gathering arrowheads or other stone implements on the surface of the ground. 

In fact the whole effect of this bill is to place serious obstacles in the way of the 
advancement of archaeological science. Its intent is doubtless commendable, but in 
its operation it can be most disastrous. I have merely pointed out the larger defects 
of this measure. An examination of the wording of the bill discloses ambiguities of 
expression and looseness of construction which would render its enactment as a 
statute highly objectionable. 

I beg leave to remain with sincere repect, very truly, yours, 

Edgar L. Hewett. 

The Commissioner op the General Land Office. 



Department of the Interior, 

General Land Office, 
Washington, D. (7., October 5 , 1904. 
Sir: I am in receipt of the acting Secretary's letter of August 15, 1904, returning 
the report, by Special Agent George F. Wilson, in the case of the prehistoric ruin 
in Arizona known as Montezuma Castle, with instructions to prepare and submit to 
the Department, for transmission to Congress, the draft of a bill setting the tract in 
question aside as a national park, and further directing as follows: 

"In this connection your attention is called to H. R. 13319, introduced in the 
House^ on March 2, 1904, by Mr. Rodenberg, entitled 'A bill for the preservation of 
historic and prehistoric ruins, monuments and archaeological objects, and to prevent 
their counterfeit.' Said bill is still pending and a copy thereof is transmitted here- 
with for your consideration as to whether or not it would answer the purpose intended 
in this connection if enacted into law. 



320 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

"I have also to suggest that you include in your annual estimate such an amount as 
in your judgment is necessary to pay for the services of a custodian for the reserva- 
tion, with, say, $500 for repairs and contingencies, and the same course should be pur- 
sued in other reservations containing ancient ruins in New Mexico. Congress has 
already established a precedent for such action by making an appropriation for the 
care and custody of the ancient ruins of Casa Grande in Arizona." 

Under the above instructions, I have the honor to submit the following report 
upon the subject, in general, of action required for the preservation of prehistoric 
ruins and other objects of historic and scientific interest upon the public domain. 

The matter is one which has been before this Office for consideration for a num- 
ber of years, and has been made the subject of repeated reports to the Depart- 
ment respecting the need for some general enactment on the subject by Congress; 
and also in connection with specific cases as they have arisen from time to time; 
but in doing so considerable difficulty has been experienced in handling the 
matter, more especially in regard to prehistoric ruins, owing to the lack of informa- 
tion of a sufficiently comprehensive nature to enable this Office to treat the subject 
as a whole. 

I am now, however, in receipt of a comprehensive statement which I transmit 
herewith, entitled a "Memorandum concerning the Historic and Prehistoric Ruins 
of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah, and their Preservation," prepared and 
submitted to this Office, under date of September 3, 1904, by Prof. Edgar L. Hewett, 
for a number of years president of the New Mexico Normal University, Las Vegas, 
N. Mex., and who has devoted much time to the matter of archaeological research in 
the Pajarito and other cliff -dwellings regions in New Mexico and Arizona. 

Professor Hewett states, that in addition to information gathered by him in person 
and through official reports made by former Special Agent S. J. Holsinger, of this 
Office, the facts presented in this paper have been compiled on the authority of such 
reliable investigators as Dr. J. Walter Fewkes, of the Bureau of American Ethnology; 
Dr. Walter Hough, of the National Museum, and Mr. A. F. Bandelier, of the Ameri- 
can Museum of Natural History, who have spent considerable time in the scientific 
study of the ruins referred to. 

Accompanying and forming a part of the statement is a blue-print map showing, 
by geographical districts, the location of the most important ruins in the pueblo 
region, in regard to which Professor Hewett states as follows: 

"Reference to the accompanying map will show at a glance that the distribution 
of the prehistoric tribes of the Southwest was determined by the drainage system. 
The great basins of the Rio Grande, the San Juan, the Little Colorado, and the Gila 
constitute the four great seats of prehistoric culture of the so-called pueblo region. 
The remains of this ancient culture are scattered extensively over these four areas, 
and it is not to be hoped, nor would it be a service to science, to attempt to preserve 
all these remains. They are of the three great types — pueblo ruins, cliff houses, and 
cavate dwellings — with their accompanying burial mounds, kivas, shrines, etc., and 
are practically innumerable. All measures for their preservation should look toward 
the encouragement of research and the advancement of knowledge, and not toward 
its restriction. 1 am of the opinion that if the principal groups or districts of ruins 
of each great culture area can be protected by the Department of the Interior and 
no excavation permitted thereon except by responsible parties bearing proper per- 
mission from the Department, the highest interests of the people will be upheld. 

"I have shown on the accompanying map that the majority of the ruins of the 
four great basins are embraced in twenty districts. The circles on the map are not 
intended to fix absolutely the boundaries of these districts. They are merely 
intended to show, approximately, how the ruins may be grouped for convenience 
and reference. 

"The districts are grouped as follows: 

"I. The Rio Grande Basin. 

"1. The Pajarito Park district. 
"2. The Pecos Pueblo district. 
"3. The Gran Quivira district. 
"4. The Jemez district. 
"5. The Acoma district. 
" II. The San Juan Basin. 

"1. The Aztec district. 
"2. The Mesa Verde district. 
"3. The Chaco Canyon district. 
"4. The Canyon de Chelly district. 
"5. The Bluff district. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 321 

"III. The Little Colorado Basin. 

"1. The Tusayan district. 

"2. The Flagstaff district. 

"3. The Holbrook district, 

"4. The Zufii district, 
"IV. The Gila Basin. 

"1. The Rio Verde district. 

"2. The San Carlos district. 

"3. The Lower Gila district. 

"4. The Middle Gila district. 

"5. The Upper Gila district. 

"6. The San Francisco River district." 

Following upon this grouping of the regions into districts, the memorandum sub- 
mits a concise statement regarding the location, extent, general condition and impor- 
tance of the ruins in each of the respective districts, which presents much valuable 
information of a specific nature. 

In regard to the subject, in general, Professor Hewett states: 

"Unquestionably some of these regions are sufficiently rich in historic and scien- 
tific interest and scenic beauty to warrant their organization into permanent national 
parks. Many others should be temporarily withdrawn and allowed to revert to the 
public domain after the ruins thereon have been examined by competent authority, 
the collections therefrom properly cared for, and all data that can be secured made 
a matter of permanent record. General legislation providing for the creation and 
administration of such parks, and providing for the excavation of ruins in the inter- 
est of science only is urgently needed. It is well known that during recent years an 
extensive traffic has arisen in relics from these ruins. In securing these, buildings, 
mounds, etc., have been destroyed. These relics are priceless when secured by 
proper scientific methods, and of comparatively little value when scattered either in 
museums or private collections without accompanying records. No scientific man is 
true to the highest ideals of science who does not protest against this outrageous 
traffic, and it will be a lasting reproach upon our Government if it does not use its 
power to restrain it. * * * 

"In conclusion, I would respectfully submit the following recommendations: 

"1. That the authority of the Department of the Interior should be immediately 
exercised to protect all ruins on the public domain. 

"2. That the Interior Department should prohibit the collecting of prehistoric 
objects from public lands and Indian reservations by any person not duly furnished 
with a permit from the Secretary of the Interior. 

"3. That custodians or inspectors, under the direction of the General Land Office, 
are needed to protect the ruins in the following districts: 

"(a) The Pajarito Park district, New Mexico. 

"(b) The Chaco Canyon district, New Mexico. 

"(c) The Mesa Verde district, Colorado. 

"(d) The Bluff district, Utah. 

"(e) The Holbrook district, Arizona. 

" (/) The Zuiii district, New Mexico. 

" (g) The Rio Verde district, Arizona. 

"(h) The Casa Grande district, Arizona. 

" (i) The Acoma district, New Mexico. 

" (j) The Middle Gila district, Arizona, 

"(k) The Gran Quivira district, New Mexico. 

" (I) The Jemez district, New Mexico. 

" With the first seven districts there is urgent need for immediate action. The 
eighth is already provided for. The next four are important in the order named. 
It would appear from general report and from the literature thereon that they are 
all of sufficient importance to warrant protection by the Government. At any rate 
they should be examined as early as possible by competent authority, and reported 
upon with reference to the present condition, character, and extent of the ruins. 

"4. That the Forestry Department, if furnished with adequate forces, could pro- 
tect the ruins in the following districts which lie within forest reserves, and that 
provision should be made for the same as early as possible. 

'"(a) The Flagstaff district, Arizona, including the important Black Falls group 
of ruins lying just above the northern boundary of the San Francisco Mountains Forest 
Reserve; also the ruins on the northern tributaries of the Rio Verde, lying within 
the same reserve and also those on the Black Mesa Forest Reserve. 

8970—04 21 



322 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

"(b) The San Francisco River district, New Mexico. 

"(c) The Upper Gila district, New Mexico. 

"5. That the cooperation of the Department of Indian Affairs is needed for the 
protection of all ruins in the following districts: 

"(a) The Pecos Pueblo district, New Mexico. 

"(b) The Canyon de Chelly district, Arizona. 

"(c). The Tusayan district, Arizona. 

"(d) The San Carlos district, Arizona. 

"(e) That part of the Zufii district, New Mexico, which lies within the Zuni 
Indian Reservation. 

"6. That there is neither economy or efficiency in the policy of employing a cus- 
todian for a single ruin. All the ruins of any district described herein can be 
efficiently protected by one or two custodians or inspectors of the grade of forest 
rangers, who should make it known, by posted notices, that the excavation of ruins 
without the permission of the Secretary of the Interior is forbidden, and who might 
also examine and report, from time to time, upon ruins within their districts which 
are in need of special attention. 

"7. That the permanent withdrawal of tracts of land from the public domain for 
the purpose of protecting ruins thereon would seem to be unnecessary except where 
the ruins are of such character and extent as to warrant the creation of permanent 
national parks. 

"8. That there is need for general legislation authorizing the creation of such 
national parks and providing for the excavation of prehistoric ruins in the interests 
of science only. 

" I respectfully submit the above as a comprehensive plan for the preservation of 
all historic and prehistoric ruins upon the public domain and upon Indian reserva- 
tions, and invite your consideration of the same. As a working plan I have no doubt 
it is open to much criticism, but I believe it might be made the basis for an econom- 
ical and efficient method of performing this public service." 

Respecting this paper, I have the honor to report that the clear and forcible state- 
ment of facts presented therein appears to leave no room to doubt that immediate 
•and effective measures on the part of the Government are needed to preserve the 
historic and prehistoric ruins and other objects of interest throughout the regions 
described from further destruction by vandalism while awaiting legislative action for 
their protection. This can best be done, apparently, by pursuing the course sug- 
gested by Professor Hewett of placing custodians in charge of the several districts as 
mapped out by him. To do this effectively, as far as necessary, at present, it is 
estimated that an appropriation of not less than $10,000 is required for the care and 
custody of the same. I have accordingly included an estimate for that amount in 
my annual estimate for this Office. 

As regards such portions of the districts as fall within forest reserves, or imme- 
diately outside of the boundaries thereof and adjacent thereto, the forest officers are 
already under general instructions to see to their protection. Further and more 
specific instructions to that effect will now be issued, based upon the information 
obtained through this paper. 

Respecting the suggestion made that the cooperation of the Indian Office is needed 
for the protection of all ruins in certain of the districts specifically named, I 
respectfully recommend that a copy of the memorandum be furnished that Office 
for consideration and action upon the suggestion, for which purpose I inclose a copy 
of the same herewith. 

I am heartily in accord with the recommendation that certain of the most impor- 
tant of these regions be set apart as national parks, and that a general law be enacted 
authorizing the establishment of such parks and making provision for their proper 
protection and management. 

This Office has repeatedly drawn attention to the need for action on the part of 
Congress in respect to making provision for the proper care of those portions of the 
public lands which, for their scenic beauty, natural wonders or curiosities, ancient 
ruins or relics, or other objects of scientific or historic interest, or springs of medici- 
nal or other properties, it is desirable to protect and utilize in the interest of the 
public. 

The existence within the limits of the public domain of such world-wonders as 
the Grand Canyon and the Petrified Forest in Arizona, the Big Trees in California, 
and the prehistoric ruins and relics which are scattered throughout the Southwest 
makes the necessity for such action manifest. 

It is equally evident that the course heretofore pursued of making each individual 
case the subject of a special legislative enactment, has been far from satisfactory 
It has, in fact, resulted in such serious delay in securing action that this Office has 
been forced to practically abandon recommending such action in any more cases. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 323 

The failure to secure legislation, through successive sessions of Congress, in cases 
of such leading importance as the Petrified Forest in Arizona, and the Cliff Dwellers' 
region in the Pajarito Canyon, New Mexico, sufficiently evidences the futility of 
attempting to secure, through the means of a special act of Congress in each instance, 
protection to the numerous localities scattered over the public domain requiring 
similar action. The cases are far too numerous to render such a course advisable. 

What is needed is a general enactment empowering the President to set apart, as 
national parks, all tracts of public land which, as above stated, for their scenic 
beauty, natural wonders or curiosities, ancient ruins or relics, or other objects of 
scientific or historic interest, or springs of medicinal or other properties, it is desira- 
ble to protect and utilize in the interest of the public. 

Since these tracts form part of the public domain, they should, when set apart, be 
placed under the exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior, who should be 
empowered to prescribe such rules and regulations and to establish such service as 
he shall deem necessary for the care and management of the same, including author- 
ity to permit proper explorations and examinations thereof, and gatherings of 
objects of interest, for scientific and historic purposes. 

A bill containing the necessary provisions to this end was drafted by this Office 
and laid before the Department on March 29, 1900. It was introduced in the Fifty- 
sixth Congress as House bill 11021, but failed of passage. 

It was subsequently reintroduced at the last session of Congress as House bill 13478, 
but no action has as yet been taken thereon. 

It is plain that the enactment of a general law of such a nature would at once place 
the Department of the Interior in a position to deal effectively with one and all of these 
regions alike, by enabling it to provide for the administration of each tract set apart 
such special regulations and service as the peculiar needs of that particular locality 
demand. For instance, in regard to tracts valuable for the antiquities contained, all 
necessary provision could be made by the Secretary of the Interior to judiciously 
regulate the matter of excavations and the use of specimens, etc., by requesting the 
proper scientific branch of the Government to render, in an advisory capacity, all 
needed assistance. 

As this particular class of cases can be readily managed under a general law of the 
nature sugested, I deem it well to call particular attention to the fact that they should 
be provided for in that manner, rather than by being made the subject of special 
legislation, as proposed in the several bills now pending in Congress which have in 
view only the matter of the preservation of antiquities. To legislate individually 
for this class of objects on the public domain is to unnecessarily multiply enactments. 

I, accordingly, recommend, as a general substitute for all other pending bills on 
the subject, the above-mentioned bill, which was drafted in this Department, viz, 
H. R. 13478, and respectfully urge that it be enacted into law at the next session of 
Congress. 

1 also agree with the further suggestion in Professor Hewett's memorandum that 
many of the tracts containing prehistoric ruins and other objects of interest should 
be only temporarily withdrawn and protected until the ruins have been examined 
by competent authority and collections made and data secured and made a matter 
of permanent record, and that so soon as this has been satisfactorily accomplished 
the lands should be released from withdrawal. 

To make proper provision for such action would necessitate an additional clause in 
the above-mentioned bill heretofore proposed by this Office. I have, accordingly, 
reshaped it to meet the desired end, and transmit a draft of the amended bill here- 
with. In doing so, 1 have slightly amended the wording of the bill. 

In regard to your above-quoted inquiry respecting the so-called Rodenberg bill, 
viz, H. R. 13349 (58th Cong., 2d sess.), attention is invited to the fact that it is 
identical with what is known as the Lodge bill in the Senate, viz, S. 5603 (58th 
Cong., 2d sess.), as originally introduced on April 20 last. 

Respecting this Rodenberg-Lodge measure, I transmit herewith a copy of Senate 
Document No. 314 (58th Cong., 2d sess.), containing a hearing before the subcom- 
mittee of the Committee on Public Lands of the Senate on said bill, in connection 
with others on the same subject, from which it appears that it was very largely 
indorsed by various scientists. 

Subsequently, however, the Lodge bill was very materially amended, and, as so 
amended, was passed by the Senate on April 26, last, and referred to the House of 
Representatives. I inclose a copy of the same herewith. 

The Lodge bill, therefore, in the form in which it has passed the Senate, will, 
doubtless, now receive consideration by the House in place of the Rodenberg bill. 

In a further communication, recently received from Professor Hewett, under date 
of the 14th instant, which I transmit herewith, this bill is very thoroughly discussed, 
and it is pointed out that, owing to various obnoxious features therein, the practical 



324 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

operation of such a measure would greatly hinder instead of advancing archaelogical 
science. 

Professor Hewett in this communication expresses himself as strongly in favor of 
the passage of the above-mentioned bill, drafted by this Office, known as the Lacey 
bill, viz, H. R. 13478, with the additional clause above suggested, and adduces good 
and sufficient reasons for its enactment. 

I, accordingly, respectfully recommend that both of his inclosed communications 
be transmitted to Congress for consideration in connection with the above-mentioned 
bills at its approaching session. 

Very respectfully, W. A. Richards, 



The Secretary of the Interior. 



Commissioner. 



A BILL to establish and administer national parks, and for other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That the President of the United States may, from time to 
time, set apart and reserve tracts of public land, which for their scenic beauty, nat- 
ural wonders or curiosities, ancient ruins or relics, or other objects of scientific or 
historic interest, or springs of medicinal or other properties it is desirable to protect 
and utilize in the interest of the public; and the President shall, by public procla- 
mation, declare the establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof. 

Sec 2. That such reservations shall be known as national parks and shall be under 
the exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior, who is hereby empowered to 
prescribe such rules and regulations and establish such service as he shall deem nec- 
essary for the care and management of the same. Such regulations shall provide 
specially for the preservation from injury or spoliation of any and all objects therein 
of interest or value to science or history. 

Sec 3. That the Secretary of the Interior be, and is hereby, authorized to permit 
examinations, excavations, and the gathering of objects of interest within such 
parks by any person or persons whom he may deem properly qualified to conduct 
such examinations, excavations, or gatherings, subject to such rules and regulations 
as he may prescribe: Provided, That the examinations, excavations, and gatherings 
are undertaken for the benefit of the Smithsonian Institution or of some reputable 
museum, university, college, or other recognized scientific or educational institution, 
with a view to increasing the knowledge of such objects. 

Sec 4. That the Secretary of the Interior be, and is hereby, authorized, in the 
exercise of his discretion, to rent or lease, under rules and regulations to be made by 
him, pieces or parcels of ground within such parks for the erection of such buildings 
as may be required for the accommodation of visitors. 

Sec 5. That all funds arising from the privileges granted hereunder shall be cov- 
ered into the Treasury of the United States as a special fund to be expended in the 
care of such parks. 

Sec. 6. That all natural wonders or curiosities, ancient ruins or relics, or other 
objects of scientific or historic interest, or springs of medicinal or other properties, 
on such of the public lands as are not set apart as national parks under the provisions 
of this Act, are hereby declared to be under the care and custody of the Secretary of 
the Interior, whose duty it shall be to protect and preserve the same from unauthor- 
ized injury or waste, in any form whatsoever, so long as shall be necessary in the 
interest of the furtherance of knowledge of any of such objects, or for the utilization 
thereof, and the Secretary of the Interior is hereby empowered to prescribe such 
rules and regulations and establish such service as he shall deem necessary for the 
care and management of the same, and he is hereby authorized to permit examina- 
tions, excavations, and the gathering of objects of interest on such lands in the same 
manner and for the same purposes as in the case of national parks established under 
the provisions of this Act. 

Sec 7. That all persons who shall unlawfully intrude upon such parks, or who 
shall, without permission, appropriate, injure, or destroy any game, fish, timber, or 
other public property therein, or injure or destroy any caves, ruins, or other works 
or relics therein, or commit unauthorized injury or waste, in any form whatsoever, 
upon the lands or other public property therein, or upon any of the lands or objects 
referred to in section six of this Act, or who shall violate any of the rules and regu- 
lations prescribed hereunder, shall, upon conviction, be fined in a sum not less than 
fifty dollars nor more than five thousand dollars, or be imprisoned for a period not 
less than fifteen days nor more than twelve months, or shall suffer both fine and 
imprisonment, in the discretion of the court. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



UNITED STATES SURVEYORS-GENERAL 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1904. 



325 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 327 



REPORT OF THE SURVEYOR-GENERAL OF ALASKA. 



Office of United States Surveyor-General, 

Sitka, Alaska, July 8, 1904. 

Sir: In compliance with your circular letter E, dated April 21, 1904, I have the 

honor to submit my annual report in duplicate of the surveying operations in the 
district of Alaska, with the following tabular statements, viz: 

A. — Showing contracts and special instructions for the survey of public lands 
awarded by the surveyor-general during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 

B. — Showing orders for mineral surveys issued by the surveyor-general during the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 

C. — Showing mineral surveys approved during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904, 
which were made under orders issued the previous fiscal year. 

During the year there have been received, recorded, filed, and indexed: 

Miscellaneous letters 876 

Department letters 209 

APPLICATIONS RECEIVED. 

For survey of mining claims ( covering 169 locations) 47 

For survey of town-site boundaries 3 

For appointment and reappointment United States deputy surveyor 14 

For appointment and reappointment United States deputy mineral surveyor . 15 

LETTERS, ORDERS, ETC., WRITTEN AND ISSUED. 

Miscellaneous letters ( covering 3, 152 pages) 1, 518 

Department letters ( covering 542 pages ) 357 

Orders for survey of mining claims (covering 191 locations) 50 

SPECIAL DEPOSITS. 

For office work and expenses in connection with survey of mining claims ... $5, 890 

MINING CLAIMS. 

Number awaiting action of office at date of last report 

Number returned by deputies during the year (covering 111 locations) 22 

Number approved (covering 86 mineral and 9 mill-site locations) 17 

Number returned to and remaining in the hands of deputies for correction 3 

Number awaiting action of office 2 

MAPS AND TRANSCRIPTS. 

Number of maps of mineral surveys made, including copies 78 

Number of maps of mineral locating monuments 3 

Number of claims protracted on mineral monument maps 57 

Number of tracings of plats 53 

Number of sketches made 6 

Number of transcripts made of location notices (covering 213 pages) - 191 

Number of transcripts made of field notes of mining claims (covering 604 

pages) 17 



328 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

NONMINERAL SURVEYS. 

Returns received from deputies during the year 59 

Forwarded to the Commissioner 31 

Held for disapproval 6 

Suspended awaiting correction by deputies 3 

Awaiting action of the office 19 

Awaiting action at date of last year's report 62 

Approved by Commissioner during the year 34 

Suspended by Commissioner during the year 17 

Disapproved by Commissioner during the year 1 

Awaiting action of Commissioner 41 

In addition to the foregoing there were assorted, jacketed, and 
labeled 640 pieces of miscellaneous matter — mostly old records; also 
12 contracts with special instructions therefor, prepared in quadrupli- 
cate, and special instructions, in quadruplicate, for 1 survey which 
was issued in lieu of a contract. 

A. — Statement showing contracts for the survey of public lands awarded by the surveyor- 
general during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 



No. 
2 
3 



Date. 



Mar. 16,1904 
Mar. 22,1904 



Apr. 15,1904 



.do 



Name. 



Elias Ruud . 
A. B. Lewis 



F. H. Lasey 



.do 



Description of work. 



Boundary of Skagway town site and the 
boundary of the reservation therein for a 
United States court-house. 

Principal base line beginning at or near Stuck 
Mountain, about 12£ miles southerly from 
Copper Center, approximate latitude 61° 
57' N., longitude 146° 30' W., at initial point 
and corner to be established for Tps. 1 N. 
and 1 S., Rs. 1 E. and 1 W., Copper River 
base and meridian; thence east, between 
Tps. 1 N. and 1 S., through Rs. 1 and 2 E.; 
thence west from said initial point between 
Tps. 1 N. and 1 S., through R. 1 W. Princi- 
pal meridian: From initial point north, be- 
tween Rs. 1 E. and 1 W., through Tps. 1, 2, 
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12; third standard 
parallel north, from corner to Tps. 12 and 13 
N., Rs. 1 E. and 1 VV., east through Rs. 1,2, 
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 E. Third guide 
meridian east from corner to Tps. 12 and 13 
N., Rs. 12 and 13 E., north between Rs. 12 
and 13 E., through Tps. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
and 18 E. 

Swedish Evangelical mission at Yakutat; 
Greek Church mission at Nutchek; Greek 
Church mission at Odiak; Greek Church 
mission at Tatlitak: Greek Church mission 
at Kanikluk; Greek Church mission at 
Ohaniga. 

Greek Church mission at St. Paul Harbor, 9 
tracts; Greek Church mission at Wood Is- 
land, 2 tracts; Baptist mission at Wood 
Island, 1 tract: (ircek Church mission at 
Spruce Island, 3 tracts; Greek Church mis- 
sion at Eagle Harbor, Kodiak Island, 1 
tract; Greek Church mission at Three 
Saints, Kodiak Island. 1 tract; Greek 
Church mission at Aetalik, Kodiak Island, 
1 tract: Greek Church mission. Pokrofsky, 
Kodiak Island, 1 tract; Greek Church mis- 
sion at Akeok. Kodiak Island, 2 tracts; 
Greek Church mission at Karluk, Kodiak 
Island, 2 tracts; Greek Church mission at 
Ongashak, 2 tracts; Greek Church mission 
on the island in the village of Afognak, 5 
tracts; Greek Church mission on the island 
and in the village of Douglas, Shelikof 
Strait, 2 tracts; Greek Church mission in 
the village of Katmai, Shelikof Strait, 2 
tracts; Greek Church mission in the vil- 
lage of Wide Bay, 2 tracts; Greek Church 
mission in the village of W T rangell (west of 
Kodiak), 2 tracts. 



Estimated 
liability. 



$250. 00 



11,100.00 



1,350.00 



3, 600. 00 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 329 

A. — Statement showing contracts for the survey of public lands awarded by the surveyor- 
general during the Ji seal year ended June 30, 1904 — Continued. 



No. 



Date. 



Name. 



Description of work. 



Estimated 
liability. 



Apr. 16,1904 H. Heinze 



.do 



Apr. 18,1904 



....do 



10 



Apr. 19,1904 



....do 

Apr. 22, 1904 



13 



May 7, 1904 



.do 



C. S. Hubbell. 



Elias Ruud 



C. E. Davidson 



....do.. 
A. Lascv 



W. Brown 



Greek Church mission in the village of Bel- 
kofski, 3 tracts; Greek Church mission in 
the village of Sannak, 2 tracts; Greek 
Church mission in the village of Protassof, 
2 tracts; Greek Church mission in the vil- 
lage of Metrofan, 2 tracts; Greek Church 
mission on island of Peregrebny, 2 tracts; 
Greek Church mission on the island of 
Unga, 2 tracts; Methodist Episcopal mis- 
sion on Unga Island, 1 tract. 

Roman Catholic mission at St. Michael, 1 
tract; Roman Catholic mission at Nome, 2 
tracts; Greek Church mission on the island 
of St. Michael, 2 tracts; Protestant Episco- 
pal mission at Nome, 1 tract; reindeer 
station at Nome, 1 tract; Swedish Evan- 
gelical mission in Unalaklik. 1 tract; rein- 
deer station at Katon, 1 tract: Congrega- 
tional mission at Cape Prince of Wales, 1 
tract; reindeer station at Teller, 1 tract; 
reindeer station at Kodney, 1 tract; Swed- 
ish Evangelical mission at Golofnin Bay, 1 
tract. 

Roman Catholic mission at Wrangell, Pres- 
byterian mission at Wrangell, Presbyte- 
rian mission at Saxman, Presbyterian mis- 
sion at Howkan (Jackson), Quaker mis- 
sion at Kake, Protestant Episcopal mission 
at Ketchikan. 

Russian Greek Church, lots 2 and 3, block 24, 
Juneau; Russian Greek Church cemetery 
at Juneau, 1 tract; Roman Catholic Church, 
2 small tracts at Juneau; Roman Catho- 
lic Church, 3 tracts on Douglas Island; 
Protestant Episcopal Church, 2 tracts at 
Juneau; Roman Catholic Church at Skag- 
way, 1 tract; Presbyterian mission at 
Haines, 1 tract; Russian Greek Church 
mission at Douglas City, 1 tract; Presbyter- 
ian mission at Hooniah, 1 tract; Russian 
Greek Church mission at Hooniah, 1 tract; 
Russian Greek Church, school, and ceme- 
tery at Killisnoo, 2 tracts. 

Roman Catholic Church at Eagle. 2 tracts; 
Presbyterian mission at Eagle, 1 tract; 
Protestant Episcopal mission at Anvik, 1 
tract; Protestant Episcopal Church at 
mouth of Tanana River, 1 tract; Protestant 
Episcopal mission at Rampart, 1 tract; 
Protestant Episcopal mission at Minook, 1 
tract: Protestant Episcopal mission at Port 
Yukon, 1 tract; Protestant mission at Cir- 
cle City, 1 tract; Roman Catholic mission 
at Nulato, 1 tract; Roman Catholic mission 
at Koserefski ( Holy Cross), 1 tract: Russian 
Greek Church mission at Ikogmut, 1 tract; 
Roman Catholic mission at Shageluk, 1 
tract; Roman Catholic mission at St. Joseph 
(Akularak), 1 tract. 

Catholic mission at Sitka, 1 tract; Presbyte- 
rian missionat Sitka, 2 tracts; RussianGreek 
mission at Sitka, 20 tracts. 

Russian Greek Church mission in the village 
of Kenai, 2 tracts; Russian Greek Church 
mission at Ninilchik, 2 tracts; Russian 
Greek Church mission at Seldovia, 2 tracts; 
Russian Greek Church mission at Alexan- 
drovsk, 2 tracts; Russian Greek Church mis- 
sion at Tyonok, 2 tracts: Russian Greek 
Church mission at Shushitna, 3 tracts; 
Russian Greek Church mission at Knik, 3 
tracts; Russian Greek Church mission at 
Kustatan, 3 tracts. 

Russian Greek Church mission in the village 
of Nushagak, 6 tracts; Russian Greek 
Church mission on bank of Nushagak, 1 
tract; Russian Greek Church mission in the 
village of Ekuk, 2 tracts; Russian Greek 
Church mission at Pogugvik, 2 tracts; Rus- 
sian Greek Church mission at Ugashak, 2 
tracts; Russian Greek Church mission at 
Koggiung, 2 tracts; Russian Greek Church 



$2, 765. 00 



, 870. 00 



1,120.00 



1,275.00 



4, 150. 00 



375. 00 
870. 00 



, 090. 00 



330 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

A. — Statement showing contracts for the survey of public lands awarded by the surveyor- 
general during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904 — Continued. 



No. 



Date. 



Name. 



Description of work. 



Estimated 
liability. 



13 



May 7, 1904 



W. Brown — Contin- 
ued. 



11 



May 7, 1901 



C. Gurnee 



(«) 



Apr. 22, 1901 



E. F. Lewis. 



mission at Iliamna, 2 tracts; Russian Greek 
Church mission at Kashanak, 2 tracts; Rus- 
sian Greek Church mission at Severskoi, 2 
tracts; Russian Greek Church mission at 
Kvichak, 2 tracts; Russian Greek Church 
mission at Kuskokwim, 2 tracts; Roman 
Catholic mission at Okuagamut. 1 tract; 
Moravian mission at Carmel, 1 tract; Mo- 
ravian mission at Bethel, 1 tract; Moravian 
mission at Ogavik, 1 tract; Moravian mis- 
sion at Togiak, 1 tract; Moravian mission 
at Quinchaha, 1 tract; Roman Catholic mis- 
sion at Cape Vancouver, Nelson Island, 1 
tract. 

I Russian Greek Church mission at Attu Is- 
land, 2 tracts; Russian Greek Church mis- 
sion at village and island of Atka, 2 tracts; 
Russian Greek Church mission. St. Paul Is- 
land, 4 tracts; Russian Greek Church mis- 
sion, St. George Island, 2 tracts; Presbyte- 
rian mission, St. Lawrence Island, 1 tract; 
Presbyterian mission at Point Barrow, 1 
tract;* Protestant Episcopal mission at 
Point Hope, 1 tract; Friends mission at 
Kotzebue Sound, 1 tract. 
Boundary lines of the town site of Nome 



$5, 500. 00 



800.00 



« Special instructions in lieu of contract. 

B. — Statement showing orders for mineral surveys issued by the surveyor-general during the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 



No. 



Name of claim. 



Mining district. 



Deputy. 



Date of approval, 
etc. 



591 
592 

593A 

593B 

594 

595 
596 
597 
598 



601 

602 

603 

604 

605 
606 

607 
608 
609 
610 

611A 

611B 
612 

613 

614 
615 

616 

617 

618 



Lovely placer 

Victoria, Seattle, et al., 25 locations. 

Ivanhoe, Ellen, et al., 5 locations .. 

Ellen mill site 

North Valparaiso quartz 



Charlotte, Bess, et al., 4 locations... 

Snow Flake fraction 

Abe Lincoln and General Giant 

Ready Bullion, Nos. 1 and 2 

Blue Jay, et al., 9 oil locations 

Redwood oil claims, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
5, 6, 7, and 8. 

Ruby oil claims, Nos. 4, 5, 6, et al., 
10 locations. 

Burls and Chilcat oil claims, 9 loca- 
tions. 

Mamie 1 and 2, Doolittle Nos. 1 and 
2, et al., 8 lode locations. 

Lyman Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 lode lo- 
cations. 

Perseverance et al., 6 locations 

Flad Strand, Bench, et al., 4 placer 
locations. 

GalTney fraction and Lucky fraction. 

McKay Bench placer 

Alpha placer 

Taku lode 



Ida, Teekalet and Gold Bluff lode 
claims. 

Washington mill site 

Maryland et al., lode claims, 6 lo- 
cations. 

Terall and Etna lodes 



Harvey and Helen S. lodes 
Combination placer No. 1. . 



Hurricane group, 1 placer and 3 
lodes. 

Unidetta group, 5 lode locations 

Rouge group, 2 lode locations 



Sitka . . 
Valdes 



Berner Bav 

....do.../. 

Point Johnson.. 



Harris . 
Nome ., 
Harris. 
....do. 
Kavak. 
....do. 



....do 

....do 

Ketchikan 
....do 



Harris 

Cape Nome 



....do. 
....do. 
Harris 
....do 



Ketchikan 



do, 

Harris 



Valdes 



Wrangell 
Valdes .. 



.do 



.do 



G. W. Garside 
A. J. Adams.. 



L. G. Hill 

do 

N. B. Whitfield.. 

G. W. Garside . . . 

A. G. Blake 

C. E. Davidson . . 

....do 

J. L. McPherson. 
....do 



.do 

.do 



L.G.Hill 
....do... 



G. W. Garside 
E. F. Lewis . . 



....do... 
....do... 
L.G.Hill 
....do... 



N.B. Whitfield. 



do 

A.Williams. 



A.J.Adams. 



L.G.Hill 

G. E. Baldwin 



.do 



.do 

.do 



Mar. 8, 1904. 

Superseded by or- 
ders 628 and 629. 

Nov. 12, 1903. 
Do. 

Returns not re- 
ceived. 

Feb. 3, 1904. 

Jan. 8, 1904. 

Nov. 25, 1903. 

Suspended. 

June 15, 1904. 

June 24, 1904. 

Returns not re- 
ceived. 
Do. 

May 14, 1904. 

May 26, 1904. 

Feb. 12, 1904. 
Returns not re- 
ceived. 
Do. 
Do. 
June 25, 1904. 
Returned for cor- 
rection. 
Do. 

Do. 
May 17, 1901. 

Returns not re- 
ceived. 

Returns on file. 

Returns not re- 
ceived. 

Returns not made. 

Do. 
Do. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 331 

B. — Statement showing orders for mineral surveys issued by the surveyor-general during the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1904 — Continued. 



No. 


Name of claim. 


Mining district. 


Deputy. 


Date of approval, 
etc. 


619 




Valdes 


G.E.Baldwin 

C.E.Davidson 

do 




ev>o \ 


Snowdrift, Diorite, et al., 7 lode 
locations. 






620B 


do 


Do. 


621 
622 


No. 3. below Good Luck, Anvil 

Creek. 
Combination placer, claim No. 2 ... 


Cape Nome 

Valdes 


PI F. Lewis 

G. E. Baldwin .... 
do 


Returns not made . 
Do. 


623 


do 


Do. 


624 




do 


do 


Do. 


625 




...do... 


...do ... 


Do. 


626 




...do .. 


...do ... 


Do. 


627 
628 

629 


Chief placer claim 

Oil Bay group of placer claims, 16 
locations. 

Innerskin group of placer claims, 
9 locations. 

Guthrie, Albert Johnson, et al., 6 
lode locations. 

Elizabeth, Marie, et al., 8 lode loca- 
tions. 

Copper Queen, Fortuna, and Re- 
gina lodes. 

Samolcon, Marmot, and Flander 
lodes. 

Castle, Retriever, etal., 5 lode loca- 
tions. 


Porcupine 

Cook Inlet 

do 


C. E. Davidson 

A.J.Adams 

do 


Do. 
Do. 

Do. 


630 
631 


Valdes 

do 


J. L. McPherson .. 
G.E.Baldwin .... 


Do. 
Do. 


632 


do 


Do 


633 


do 


do 


Do. 


634 


do 


do 


Do. 


635 


do 


do 

C.E.Davidson 

C. E. Baldwin . . 


Do. 


636 
637 


Jenks fraction, Mix, et al.. 5 lode 
locations. 


Porcupine 


Do. 
Do. 


638 
639 


Lookout group, consisting of 7 lode 
locations. 


Ketchikan 

Porcupine 


N. B. Whitfield... 
C. E. Davidson . . . 

G. W. Garside 


Do. 
Do. 


307 


Amended survey. 













C. — Statement of mineral surveys approved ivhich were made under orders issued the pre- 
vious year. 



No. 


Name of claim. 


Mining district. 


Deputy. 


Date of approval, 
etc. 


578 


Rose, Last Chance, et al., 10 lode 
locations. 

Mildred, Vera, et al., 6 lode loca- 
tions. 

Mill site 


Berner Bay 

Windham Bay 


L. G. Hill 


Nov. 5, 1903. 


579A 


do 


Dec. 9, 1903. 


579B 


do 


do 


Do. 


582 






...do.. 


Aug. 27, 1903. 
Mar. 15, 1904. 


589 


Blackbird group, 4 lode locations . . 


Valdes 


G. E. Baldwin .... 



The following is a complete list of United States deputy mineral surveyors who 
have furnished bonds: 



Name. 


Home address. 


Alaska address. 








Ashford, Geo. M 












Blake, Arthur G 


San Francisco, Cal 


Nome, Alaska. 


Blakely, J. F 


Seattle, Wash 




Brown, Webster 


do 




Buck, Rufus 


...do... 




Carter, A. B 


Oakland, Cal 

Seattle, Wash 


tory. 
Teller, Alaska, 


Chapman, W. S 


Kavak, Alaska. 


Davidson, C. E 


Juneau, Alaska 


Juneau, Alaska. 


Davidson, J. M 






Edgerton, H. H., jr 




Unknown. 


Flood, Francis B 


Seattle, Wash . 


Do. 


Fox, David 


Suffern, N. Y... 


Do. 


Garside, Geo. W 


Juneau, Alaska 


Juneeu, Alaska, 



332 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



Name. 


Home address. 


Alaska address. 




Juneau, Alaska 






do 


Juneau, Alaska. 














Hill, Llovd G 


J uneau, Alaska 


Juneau, Alaska. 


Hesse, W. A 


Seattle, Wash 


Nome, Alaska. 




San Francisco, Cal 

Wrangell, Alaska 




Hubbell, Charles S 


Wrangell, Alaska. 










San Francisco, Cal 


Unknown. 




do 


Do. 


Lewis, E. F 




Nome, Alaska. 




Valdes, Alaska 


Valdes, Alaska. 




Skagway, Alaska 


Kavak, Alaska. 




Seattle, Wash 








Do. 




do 


Do. 


Meals, A. J 


Chesna, Alaska 


Chesna. Alaska. 


Phillpotts, Wm. M 


Rodman Bav, Alaska 


Rodman Bav, Alaska. 






Skagway, Alaska. 








do 


Do. 


Stanley, F. D . . 




Do. 








Thorne, J. F 






Whitfield, N. B 






Whitfield, D. S 


do 


Do. 


Whit worth, F. H . 


Seattle, Wash 




Week. C. A 




Do. 


Whittren. J. Potter... 






Wilson, C. P 


do 


Kayak, Alaska. 
Treadwell, Alaska. 




Seattle, Wash 











The following is 
furnished bonds: 



a* complete list of United States deputy surveyors who have 



Name. 


Home address. 


Alaska address. 






Resurrection Bay. 


Ashford, Geo. U 










Baldwin. Geo. E 




Do. 


Blake, Arthur G... 






Barstow. David G 


Oakland, Cal 


Herendeen Bav. 


Brown, Webster 


Seattle, Wash 


Valdes. 


Buck, Ruf us 


do 


Dawson, Northwest Terri- 


Davick, Lauritz E 


do 


tory. 


Davidson, Charles E 






Edgerton, H. H., jr 






George, Thomas H 






George, Martin 


do 


Sitka. 














Hill, Lloyd G 


do 


Do. 




Chicago, 111 




Hubbell, Charles S 


Wrangell. 


Hesse, Wm. A 


Seattle, Wash 


Lascy, Albert 






Lascy, Frank H 


do 


Do. 


Lewis, E. F 












McPherson, J. L 

Meals A. J. 

Phill potts, Wm. M........... 


Seattle, Wash 














Skagway. 


Smith, J. Henry 




Spn.ttlp Wash 


Do. 




Do. 


Thorne, J. F 


Portland, Oreg 


Do. 


Whitfield, N. B 

Whitfield, D. S 


Ketchikan, Alaska 

do 


Ketchikan. 
Do. 


Wilson, Clarence P 


Seattle, Wash ■. 


Kayak. 







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 333 

It will be noticed by tabular statement A, accompanying this report, that thirteen 
contracts and one special instructions, in lieu of a contract, for the survey of public 
lands and mission claims were awarded during the fiscal year just ended, the aggregate 
liability of which exceeds $46,000. It is probable that returns under some of these 
will be made during the calendar year, and it is therefore desirable that immediate 
steps be taken toward arranging for a field inspection of them, as it is a matter not 
only of concern but of simple justice to the contracting deputies that the required 
examination of their surveys be made with the least possible delay after their com- 
pletion. 

In view of the remoteness of this district from other surveying districts, the length 
of time it takes to reach it, and the heavy traveling expenses incident upon making 
the voyage to this country, I would recommend that an examiner of surveys be 
appointed specially for Alaska, with headquarters at some convenient point in the 
district; and also further to facilitate the examination and approval of the surveys, that 
he be placed under the direction of this office. This arrangement would expedite 
the approval of surveys and the adjustment of the deputies' accounts. It would also 
very materially curtail the expense of making the examination, shorten the time 
within which claimants might procure title to their land, and consequently be 
advantageous to all concerned. 

On the 14th ultimo this office submitted estimate of funds necessary to be appro- 
priated for the surveying service in this district for the fiscal vear ending June 30, 
1906. 

The amount estimated for extending the lines of public surveys aggregates $120,000. 
That the estimate was made along conservative lines the following explanatory note, 
which accompanied it, will show: 

"There are about 370,000,000 acres of unsurveyed public land in Alaska. That a 
liberal per cent of this vast area is adapted to agriculture of one sort or other is no 
longer a matter of conjecture, and since the act of March 3, 1903, permitting home- 
steads to be taken in advance of the extension of the public surveys, home seekers 
and stock raisers have been making inquiries concerning the most desirable localities 
for farming and pasturing stock. 

"The act above mentioned contains generous provisions for settlers in this district, 
but if it is not supplemented with liberal appropriations for the survey of the public 
lands within its limits its purposes will be largely negatived. 

"Under the provisions of that act any one who is qualified to make entry of public 
land is entitled to a homestead of 320 acres. Permission is given to initiate such 
claims prior to the extension of the lines of public survey by filing a description of 
them with the recorder of the recording district in which they are situated; but if 
at the expiration of the required time in which to 'prove up' the lines of public 
surveys have not been extended so as to include it, the claimant in order to procure 
a patent for the land must have an official survey made of the claim at his own 
expense. As the cost of such survey is no small item, and such settlers generally 
can not well afford such an outlay, the burden that an expense of this kind would 
involve should be averted if possible. 

"That there will be many homesteads taken under said provisions of law there 
can be but little doubt. Although as hereinbefore stated, the law does not require 
that a settler shall have his claim surveyed until five years after its initiation in 
order to procure patent, nevertheless several surveys of this class of claims have been 
submitted to this office already. These, however, are probably only a small fraction 
of the number which have been filed for record with the recorders of the various 
recording districts; but as it is not required that the record of such claims be fur- 
nished this office, it has no means of knowing how many have been located and 
recorded. 

"A contract has been made for surveying 198 miles of base, meridian, and stand- 
ard lines in the Copper River Valley. These are primary lines with which to con- 
nect township and subdi visional surveys in that region of country. They will be 
useful only for that purpose, and therefore should be supplemented by the exten- 
sion of township boundary lines so soon as they are completed. Department regu- 
lations provide that the subdivisional survey of a township will be authorized only 
in response to the application of at least three bona fide settlers therein. In making 
such application the settlers are required to designate the township in which their 
claims are situated and also as nearly as practicable the sections within the township. 
If only the primary lines to govern such surveys have been established over a region 
of country, it is impracticable for a settler to determine or even intelligently con- 
jecture the number of the township and range in which his claim will be, and conse- 
quently provision should be made for surveying township boundaries over areas in 
which settlers are located or are likely to be in the near future. 



334 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

"There are other sections that contain arable lands, for the survey of which it will 
be necessary to establish independent bases and meridians with which to connect 
township and subdivisional surveys, the configuration and topographic features of 
this district rendering it impracticable to connect the surveys in all parts of it with 
one principal base and meridian. The more prominent of these localities are in 
Kenai Peninsula and on Kodiak Island. There is said to be a large area of good 
agricultural land in the above-mentioned peninsula upon which settlements are being 
made, and Kodiak Island contains fine pasture lands which are beginning to be used 
by stockholders for grazing purposes. Provision should be made for establishing 
meridians and bases and for extending township lines in those localities. There are 
also still other localities where it will be necessary to establish short independent 
base and meridian lines in order to accommodate settlers, especially on the islands 
of Alexander Archipelago and the Aleutian Islands. 

"As stated last year, there are many tracts of land in Alaska which are reserved by 
Executive orders or otherwise for the use of the various departments of the Govern- 
ment. As many of these tracts are set aside merely by description of metes and 
bounds, the deflection of the theoretical lines made from uncertain meridians with- 
out corner monuments to mark the angles, it is impracticable to determine just what 
land is reserved. As these reserves are generally at or adjoining centers of popula- 
tion, it is especially desirable that they be more definitely delimited as uncertainties 
of boundaries, inexactly described, without corner monuments or line marks to 
identify them, lead to confusion and in some cases retard improvements. Provision 
ought to be made and authority given for surveying all of these reserves, so that their 
exact locus and extent may be apparent on the ground and of record in this office. 

"Proposals for executing surveys in this district show that the cost of surveying 
will be much greater in it than in other districts. The reason for this is because of 
the higher wages it is necessary to pay assistants, the greater cost of transporting 
supplies, the shortness of the surveying season, and the unfavorable climatic condi- 
tions for using the surveying instrument, which prevail in many localities during the 
summer months, especially in regions bordering the coast, the sun being obscured 
much of the time by fog or clouds."- 

The area of this surveying district is many fold larger than any other in the United 
States, and it may be safely said that its natural resources, in most lines, are also 
greater in the same proportion. Notwithstanding the developments of these resources 
are mostly in their incipiency, the outlook is promising. As development work 
progresses and explorations are carried into new fields its latent possibilities become 
more apparent. The period of uncertainty is past and advancement promises to be 
more rapid henceforth. Provision has been made and preparations consummated 
for beginning the system of public land surveys in this district. As tabular state- 
ment A of this report shows, contracts, the aggregate liability of which exceeds 
$46,000, were awarded during the fiscal year for surveying public lands and mission 
claims, and dthers will probably be awarded in the near future. This is only the 
beginning of what promises to be an active era of surveying operations in Alaska. 
In view of this it goes without saying that it is necessary that provision be made for 
sufficient clerical assistance to perform the greatly increased amount of work which 
will come to the office with proper dispatch and efficiency. This matter was fully 
set forth in my annual estimates, and I most earnestly hope it may receive favorable 
consideration. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Wm. L. Distin, 
U. S. Surveyor- General of Alaska. 

The Commissioner of the General Land Office, 

Washington, D. C. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 335 



REPORT OF THE SURVEYOR-GENERAL OF ARIZONA. 



Office of United States Surveyor-General, 

Phoenix, Ariz., July 1, 1904- 
Sir: In compliance with Department letter E, dated April 21, 1904, I have the 
honor to submit herewith (in duplicate) my annual report for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1904. 

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

The apportionment to Arizona from the regular appropriation for surveys and 
resurveys of public lands for the fiscal year, as per annual surveying instructions, 
was $14,000. By letter E, dated June 24, 1904, notice was given that an additional 
credit of $14,000 had been made. The total apportionment to this district was 
therefore $28,000. 

The following tabular statement shows the contracts entered into which are payable 
therefrom: 



No. 
no 
ill 

112 
113 



Date. 



Name of deputy. 



Description of surveys to be made. 



Estimated 
liability. 



Feb. 10 
Feb. 18 



Feb. 24 
Mar. 14 



Mar. 16 



Philip Contzen 

John F. Hesse 

Jno. A. Rockfellow. 
Fisher & Hesse 



Philip Contzen 



Apr. 18 



Chas. L. Campbel 
and Ivan Oakes. 



117 



May 28 



June 13 



.do, 



Wm. B. Alexander. 



The survey of the west boundary of T. 10 S. , R. 26 E. , 
and the survey of the west and south boundaries 
and the subdivisional lines in T. 9 S., R. 26 E. 

The completion of the survey of the north boun- 
dary west from the corner of sees. 4, 5, 32, and 
33, and the survey of the west boundary and sub- 
divisional lines of T. 10 N., R. 6 W. 

The survev of the north and east boundaries and 
the subd'i visional lines of T. 23 S., R. 28 E. 

The completion of the survey of the east boundary 
and the survey of the remaining subdivisional 
lines, south of sees. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18 of T. 15 
N.,R.6E. 

The survey of the north, west, and south bounda- 
ries of T. 22 S., R. 17 E., and the west and frac- 
tional south boundaries of T. 23 S., R. 17 E., the 
fractional west boundary of T. 24 S., R. 17 E., the 
fractional east and north boundaries of T. 24 S., 
R. 18 E., and the subdivisional lines in Tps. 22, 
23, and 24 S., R. 17 E., and T. 24 S., R. 18 E., not 
within the boundaries of the San Rafael de la 
Zanza private land grant and the survey of the 
north and west boundaries and subdivisional 
lines of T. 18 S., R. 16 E. 

The survey of 1 mile of the east boundary of T. 7 
N., R. 10 E., the survey of the east boundary of 
Tps. 8, 9, 10, and 11 N., R. 10 E., the east bound- 
ary of T. 10 N, R. 11 E.. the completion of the 
survey of the east boundary of T. UN., R. 11 E., 
the west boundary of T. 10 N.. R. 10 E., the north 
and south boundaries of T. 10 N., Rs. 10 and 11 
E., the east boundary of T. 12 N.. R. 10 E., and 
the subdivisional lines of Tps. 10 and 11 N., R. 11 
E., Tps. 10 and 12 N., R. 10 E. 

Supplemental instructions provide for survey of 
the north boundary of T. 11 N., E. 11 E.; west 
boundary of T. 1U N., R. 11 E., and the subdi- 
visional "lines of T. 1V S N., R. 11 E. 

The survey of the north and east boundaries of 
T. 10 S., Rs. 15 and 16 E., the south 3 miles of the 
west boundary of T. 9 S., R. 15 E., the west 
boundary of T. 9 S., R. 16 E., and the subdivi- 
sional lines of the south halves of T. 9 S., Rs. 15 
and 16 E., and the north halves of T. 10 S., Rs. 
15 and 16 E., or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to include any settler residing thereon. 

a Special instructions. 



$600. 00 
500. 00 



500. 00 
700. 00 



2,400.00 



4, 300. 00 



550. 00 



2, 000. 00 



336 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



No, 



Date. 



Name of deputy. 



Description of surveys to be made. 



Estimated 
liability. 



118 



(a) 



119 



120 



121 



June 11 



June 14 



June 17 



...do.. 



...do... 



John A. Rockfellow . 



John F. Hesse 



John M. Ingalls. 



J.J.Fisher. 



John F. Hesse 



The south boundary and not to exceed the survey 
of 18 sections of T. 18 S., R. 19 E., that may be 
necessarv to properlv include the agricultural 
claims of Mrs. L. S. Trask, F. L. Trask, and H. 
K. Street, situate therein. 

The east boundary and the subdivisional lines 
necessary to properly embrace the south 24 sec- 
tions of T. 30 N., R. 4 E., or so much of this por- 
tion of the township south of the Grand Canyon 
as will be necessary to include the claims of P. 
D. Berry and John Hance, situate therein, but 
not to exceed the survey of 24 sections of this 
township. 

The third guide meridian east through Tps. 5, 6, 7, 
and 8 N., the second standard parallel north 
through Rs. 12, 13, 14, and 15 E., the north bound- 
aries of T. 6 N., Rs. 13, 14, and 15 E., and the 
west and east boundaries of Tps. 7 and 8 N., R. 
14 E., and the north boundaries of T. 7 N., Rs. 14 
and 15 E., together with all subdivisional lines 
of Tps. 7 and 8 N., Rs. 14 and 15 E. 

The second standard parallel north through Rs. 10 
and 11 E., the west boundaries of Tps. 8 and 9 N., 
R. 10 E., the south boundaries of T. 8 N., Rs. 10 
and 11 E., the east boundaries of Tps. 8 and 9 N., 
R. 11 E. , and the subdivisional lines of Tps. 8 and 
9 N., Rs. 10 and 11 E. 

The east 3 miles of the north boundary of T. 1 N., 
R. 30 E., the east boundaries of Tps.l, 2, 3, and 4N., 
R. 31 E., the east! miles of the north boundary 
of T.3N., R. 31 E., the north and west bounda- 
ries of Tps. 1 and 2 N., R. 31 E., the fractional 
north boundary of T. 3 N., R. 32 E., or so much 
thereof, together with the subdivisional lines of 
Tps. 1, 2, 3, and 4 N., R. 31 E., T. 1 N., R. 30 E., 
and Tps. 3 and 4 N., R. 32 E., that may be abso- 
lutely necessary to include the agricultural and 
grazing lands lying along or within the canyon 
of the Blue River, running through said town- 
ships. 



$650. 00 



).00 



5, 000. 00 



5, 000. 00 



4,800.00 



a Special instructions. 



SPECIAL DEPOSITS BY RAILROAD COMPANIES, UNDER ACT OF CONGRESS APPROVED 

FEBRUARY 27, 1899. 

During the fiscal year deposits have been made by the Santa Fe Pacific Railroad 
Company, as follows: 

For field work $692. 00 

For examination in the field, and advertising 110. 00 

For office work and stationery 40. 00 

Total deposit 842. 00 

The following contract was entered into, payable from the above fund, as follows: 



No. 


Date. 


Name of deputy. Description of surveys to be made. 


Estimated 
liability. 


109 


1903 
Dec. 11.. 


John F. Hesse The survey of all lines necessary for the completion 

of the survey of the east boundary of T. 31 N., 
R. 2 E., and the survey of the remaining sub- 
divisional line north of sees. 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, and 
30, so far as the rim of the Grand Canyon. 


$692.00 



SPECIAL DEPOSITS BY INDIVIDUALS. 

Under sections 2401, 2402, and 2403, as amended by the act of August 20, 1894, the 
following deposits were made: 

For field work $1, 852. 00 

For examination in the field 175. 00 

For office work and stationery 145. 00 

Total deposit 2, 172. 00 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 337 

Contracts have been entered into, payable from the above fund, as follows: 



No. Date. 


Name of deputy. 


Description of surveys to be made. 


Estimated 
liabilities. 


(«) 
114 


1903 
Dec. 26 

1904 
Mar. 15 


John F. Hesse 

Philip Contzen 


The survey of the remaining unsurveved lines of 
sec. 23, f . 13 N., K. 3 W., or so much of the lines 
as may be absolutely necessary to properly lo- 
cate Government Springs, purported to be 
located in said sec. 23 of the above township and 
range. 

The survey of the east, north, south, and west 
boundaries, and subdivisional lines of T. 4 S., 
R. 17 E., Gila and Salt River meridian, lands 
presumably containing coal. 


$100.00 
1, 350. 00 



a Special instructions. 

On January 18, 1904, an additional deposit of $1,500 was made by the Santa Fe 
Pacific Railroad Company for office work and stationery in connection with surveys 
in the San Francisco Forest Reserve, Arizona. This additional deposit was required 
on account of the inadequacy of the original amount deposited by the said company 
for the same purpose. 

The following tabular statement shows the surveys approved during the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1904: 



No 



(a) 



90 



( 6 ) 



Date. 



1901. 
May 23 

July 13 



1902. 
Feb. 20 



1901. 
Dec. 16 



1902. 
July 26 



June 30 



June 30 



Aug. 1 
Aug. 19 



Name of deputy. 



John Nash. 
J. A. Barry 



.do 



Philip Contzen 



.do 



F. B. Jacobs . 



Caudle & Caudle 



Description of work. 



do 

do 



East and north boundaries of T. 5 S., 

R. 30 E., and subdivisions. 
Exteriors and subdivisions of T. 1 N., 

Rs. 23 and 24 W., Tps. 1 and 2 S., Rs. 

23 and 24 W. 



North and west boundaries of T. 3 S., 
R. 23 W., and a portion of the Gila 
and Salt River base line, through Rs. 
23 and 24 W. 

Sixth standard parallel north through 
R. 8 E.; eighth standard parallel 
north through Rs. 9. 10, 11, and 12 E.; 
second guide meridian east through 
townships from 25 to 32 N., inclusive; 
third guide meridian E. through T. 
32 N., all exteriors and subdivisions 
of Tps. 31 and 32 N., Rs. 11 and 12 E. 
and Tps. 32 and 33 N., Rs.ll and 12 E. 



The survevof the sixth standard par- 
allel north through R. 9 E. 

North and east boundaries and subdi- 
visions of Tps. 22. 23, 24, and 25 N., 
R. 9 E., except sixth standard paral- 
lel north through R. 9 E. 

Exteriors and subdivisions of T. 25 N., 
Rs. 3 and 4 E.; T. 24 N., R. 4 E.; T. 
21 N., R. 9 E.; and all lines necessary 
to complete survey of fractional T. 
21 N., R. 8 E.; west boundary and 
south half of east boundarv of sec. 
33, T. 21 N., R. 5 E., and east and 
west boundaries of sec. 4 of T. 20 
N., R. 5E. 

All resurveys and retracements neces- 
sary to execute above. 

Resurvey of sixth standard parallel 
north through R. 4 E. and retrace- 
ment through R. 3 E. 



Remarks. 



Survey accepted. 

Surveys accepted ex- 
cept Tps. 1 S. and 1 
N., R. 24 W., which 
surveys deputy has 
been ordered to cor- 
rect. 



Surveys suspended by 
Department letter E, 
dated Dec. 28, 1903. 
The survey of sixth 
standard parallel 
north through Rs. 
8 and 9 E., and sec- 
ond guide meridian 
east through T. 25 N. 
accepted by Depart- 
ment letter E, dated 
Jan. 21, 1904. 



Surveys accepted. 



Surveys under con- 
tract No. 97, ap- 
proved by your 
office, except as to 
Tps. 20 and 21 N., R. 
5 E., which returns 
are transmitted to 
the General Land 
Office for approval. 



Supplemental special instructions. 



l> Special instructions. 



8970—04- 



-22 



338 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



No. 


Date. 


Name of deputy. 


Description of work. 


Remarks. 


98 


1902. 
June 30 


J. A. Lamport 


East boundary of Tps. 23 and 24 N., 
R. 8 E., north and west boundaries 
of sec. 6 of T. 21 N., R. 8 E., east 
half of north boundary of sec. 1 of 
T. 21 N., R. 7 E., south boundary of 
T. 24 N., R. 8 E., and subdivisions of 
Tps. 23, 24, and 25 N., R. 8 E., and 
completion of subdivisions of T. 23 
N., R. 7 E., line between sees. 1 and 
3, T. 21 N., R. 7 E., line between 
sees. 2 and 3 of T. 21 N., R. 6 E., line 
between sees. 25 and 36 of T. 22 N., 
R. 7E. 


Surveys accepted. 


(a) 


Aug. 2 


do 


Fractional south boundary of T. 23 N., 
R. 7 E., and all resurveys and retrace- 
ments necessary to complete all 
above surveys. 




99 


June 30 


Andrew Barry, F. B. 
Jacobs, coinpass- 
man. 


The south and west boundaries, T. 19 
N., R. 5 E., the east half of the north 
boundary, the south half of west 
boundary, and south boundary of 
T 19 N., R. 4 E., and subdiyisional 
lines of T. 19 N., Rs. 4 and 5 E. 


Do. 


(«) 


Aug. 4 


do 


All resurveys and retracements neces- 
sary to execute the above. 




101 


June 30 


J. B. Girand and P. 


That* portion of the resurvey of the 


These surveys, which 






W. Natimer. 


fourth standard parallel north from 
the one-quarter section corner along 
the south boundary sec. 32, T. 17 N., 
R. 6 E., to the corner T. 17 N., Rs. 7 
and 8 E., and closing lines thereon. 


were suspended by 
Department letter E, 
dated May 26, 1903, 
have been accepted. 


102 


....do... 


W. O. Secor 


The south boundary of T. 19 N., Rs. 2 
and 3 E., 1 mile of the north bound- 


All surveys under 
contract, except T. 












ary of T. 19 N., R. 6 E., 3i miles of 


20 N., R. 6 E., which 








the west boundary and 1 mile of the 


hasbeentransmitted 








south boundary t. 18 N., R. 6 E., 2 


to Washington, have 








miles of north boundary T. 17 N., 


been approved by 








R. 5 E., 2J miles of the east bound- 


your office. 








ary of T. 17 N., R.6 E., the comple- 










tion of the subdivisions of T. 20 N., R. 










4 E., the line between sees. 24 and 










25, T. 20 N., R. 6 E., the completion 










of the subdiyisional lines of T. 19 N., 










Rs. 2, 3, and 6 E., T. 18 N., R. 6 E., 










T. 17 N., Rs. 5 and 6 E. 




(">) 


Aug. 5 


do 


The completion of range line between 








Rs. 2 and 3 E., T. 19 N. 




(a) 


Aug. 6 


do 


All resurveys and retracements neces- 






sary to execute the above. 




103 


Sept. 27 


J. F. Hesse 


The survey of the south and a portion 


Contract approved by 
Department letter E 






of the north boundary of T. 18 N., 








R. IE., retracement of the Gila and 


dated June 30, 1904. 








Salt River meridian, through T. 18 










N., subdivisions of T. 18 N., R. 1 E., 










and all necessary retracements and 










resurveys in connection therewith. 




104 


Nov. 15 
1903. 


Philip Contzen 


The north and east boundaries, Tps. 13 
and 14 S., R. 11 E., north and west 
boundaries Tps. 13 and 14 S., R. 10 E., 
subdivisions Tps. 13 and 14 S., Rs. 10 
and 11 E., and resurveys in connec- 
tion therewith. 


Survey accepted, but 
plats not ordered 
riled. 


109 


Dec. 11 


J.F.Hesse 


The completion of the east boundary 


Survey approved. 








of T. 31 N., R. 2 E., and the remain- 








ing subdivisional lines, north of sees. 










25 to 30, inclusive, so far as the rim 










of the Grand Canyon. 





a Special instructions. 



b Supplemental special instructions. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 339 

The following tabular statement shows surveys not closed June 30, 1904, for con- 
tracts awarded prior to June 30, 1903: 



No. 



Date. 



Name of deputy, 



Description of work. 



Remarks. 



56 



(a) 



81 



84 



Apr. 15 



1899. 
June 24 



Nov. 1 



1901. 
May 17 



May 23 



July 13 



1902. 
Feb. 20 



1901. 
Oct. 19 



Dec. 9 



1902. 
Feb. 20 



1901. 
Dec. 16 



C. E. Perkins. 



A. T. Col ton. 



.do 



John Nash 



F.B.Jacobs. 



J.A.Barry 



.do 



John Nash 



A.B. Mader. 



.do 



Philip Contzen 



1902. 
July 26 



1903 
Feb. 26 



.do 



A. T. Colton . 



Subdivisions of that portion of T. 10 
N., R. 20 E., lying north of north 
boundary of White Mountain Indian 
Reservation and lines for closing 
public surveys in T. 9 N., Rs. 20, 21, 
22, and 25 E., and T. 10 N., Rs. 18, 19, 
and 21 E., Arizona. 



North, east, and west boundaries and 
subdivisions of T. 7 N., R. 10 E.; re- 
survey of the north boundary White 
Mountain Indian Reservation with- 
in T. 9 N., Rs. 21, 22, 24, and 25 E., T. 
10 N., Rs. 18, 19, 20, and 21, and T. 11 
N., R. 18 E., Arizona. 

Resurvey that portion of White Moun- 
tain Indian Reservation through T. 
8 N., Rs. 22, 23, and 24 E., and T. 9 N., 
R. 20 E., also westward through Rs. 
17, 16, and 15 E. to northwest corner 
of reservation. 

Fractional west, east, and south 
boundaries and subdivisions of T. 8 
S., R.24E. 



East, south, and west boundaries and 
subdivisions of T. 1 S., R. 13 E.; resur- 
vev of the Gila and Salt River base 
line through R. 13 E. 



Exterior and subdivisions of T. 1 N., 
Rs. 23 and 24 W. ; Tps. 1 and 2 S., Rs. 
23 and 24 W. 



West and north boundaries of T. 3 S., 
R. 23 W. ; a portion of the Gila and 
Salt River base line through Rs. 23 
and 24 W. 

South boundaries and subdivisions of 
fractional T. 9 S., R. 32 E. 



South boundaries and subdivisions T. 
16 N., R. 5 W., the fourth standard 
parallel north through R. 5 W. 

Resurvey of the west boundaries of T. 
16 N., R.4 W. 

The sixth standard parallel north 
through R. 8 E.; the eighth standard 
parallel north through Rs. 9, 10, 11, 
and 12 E.; the second guide meridian 
east through Tps. 25 to 32 N., inclu- 
sive; the third guide meridian east 
through T. 32 N.; all exterior and 
subdivisional lines of Tps. 31 and 32 
N., Rs. 11 and 12 E.; Tps. 32 and 33 
N., R. 10 E. 

The sixth standard parallel north 
through R. 9 E. 



Office work awaiting 
action of Commis- 
sioner on returns of 
White Mountain In- 
dian Reservation by 
Deputy Colton, un- 
der contract No. 56. 
Colton's corrective 
notes not yet filed. 

SurveyT.7N.,R.10E., 
accepted; balance of 
contract canceled 
and authority for is- 
suance of new con- 
tract given this 
office. 



Notes filed. Survey 
suspended by exam- 
iner. Deputy or- 
dered to field to cor- 
rect. 

All surveys under con- 
tract accepted, ex- 
cept T. 1 S., R. 13 E. 
Bondsmen called 
upon to designate a 
compassman for ex- 
ecution of survey of 
T.1S..R.13E. 

Surveys accepted, ex- 
cepting Tps. 1 S. and 
1 N.,R. 24 W., which 
surveys deputy has 
been ordered to cor- 
rect. 



Awaiting instruction 
from your office pur- 
suant to advice from 
field examiner as to 
unacceptable condi- 
tion of said surveys. 

Office work in prog- 
ress. 



a Special instructions. 



Connection of United States location 
monuments and surveyed mining 
claims in T. 1 N., R. 15 E., with lines 
of the public survey. 

b Supplemental special instructions 



Do. 



The sixth standard 
parallel north 
through Rs. 8 and 9 
E. , and second guide 
meridian east 
through T. 25 N. are 
accepted. Corrected 
notes for remaining 
surveys on file in this 
office. 



Notes returned to the 
deputy for correc- 
tions. 



340 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



No. 


Date. 


Name of deputy. 


Description of work. 


Remarks. 


94 


1902 
June 2 


H. F. Robinson 


Exterior and subdivisions to complete 
survey of T. 2 N., Rs. 3 and 4 E. 


Office work in progress 
awaitingcorrections 
by deputy. 

Surveys approved by 


97 


June 30 


Caudle & Caudle 


Exterior and subdivisions of T. 25 N., 








Rs. 3 and 4 E., T. 24 N., R. 4 E., T. 21 


your office, except 








N., R. 9 E., and all lines necessary 


as to Tps. 20 and 21 








to complete survey of fractional T. 


N.,R.5E., which re- 








21 N., R. 8 E.; west boundary and 


turns have been 








south half of east boundary of sec. 


transmitted for your 








33, T. 21 N., R. 5 E., and east and 


approval. 








west boundaries of sec. 4 of T. 20 N., 










R. 5E. 




(a) 


Aug. 1 


do 


All resurveys and retracements neces- 
sary to execute above. 




(a) 


Aug. 19 


do 


Resurvey of sixth standard parallel 
north through R. 4 E. and retrace- 
ment through R. 3 E. 




100 


June 30 


H. B. Maxson 


West boundary T. 18 N., Rs. 4 and 5 E.; 
north and east boundaries T. 18 N. , R. 
11 E.; north and west boundaries T. 

17 N.,R.4E„ and subdivisions of T. 

18 N., Rs. 4, 5, and 11 E. and T. 17 N., 
R. 4E. 


Bondsmen called up- 
on to designate a 
compassman to ex- 
ecute surveys. 


(a) 


July 29 


do 


All resurveys and retracements neces- 










sary to execute the above. 




102 


June 30 


W. O. Secor 


The south boundary of T. 19 N., Rs. 2 


Surveys accepted ex- 
cepting as to T. 20 








and 3 E.; 1 mile of the north bound- 








ary of T. 19 N., R. 6 E.; 3i miles of 


N., R. 6 E., which 








the west boundarv, and 1 mile of the 


has been trans- 








south boundary, T. 18 N., R. 6 E.; 2 


mitted for your ap- 








miles of north boundary, T. 17 N., R. 


proval. 








5 E.; 2i miles of the east boundarv 










of T. 17 N., R. 6 E.; the completion 










of the subdivisions, T. 20 N., R. 4 E.; 










the line between sees. 24 and 25. T. 










20 N., R. 6 E.; the completion of the 










aubdivisional lines of T. 19 N., Rs. 2, 










3, and6E.,T. 18N..R. 6E.; T. 17 N., 










Rs. 5 and 6 E. 




(*>) 


Aug. 5 


do 


The completion of range line between 
Rs. 2 and 3E,T. 19 N. 








( a ) 


Aug. 6 


do 


All resurveys and retracements neces- 










sary to execute the above. 




105 


Nov. 29 


Philip Contzen 


Survey of connecting lines and so 


San Rafael de la Zanja 
grant approved. 








much of the boundary lines of the 








San Rafael de la Zanja and the San 


Remaining portion 








Jose de Sonoita private land claims 


of contract transmit- 








as is in Santa Cruz County, Ariz., and 


ted to your office 








confirmed by United States Court of 


and awaiting your 




1903 
Feb. 24 




Private Land Claims. 


approval. 


(a) 


do 


Resurvey of sec. lines closing on San 










Jose de Sonoita private land grant. 




106 


Apr. 16 


S. E. Day 


The south boundary of T. 27 N., R. 27 


Deputy ordered to re- 
execute the con- 






E.; south, east, ami west boundaries, 








and subdivisions of T. 27 N., R. 26 E. 


tract. 



« Special instructions. b Supplemental special instructions. 

GENERAL FIELD WORK. 

Mileage and acreage embraced in surveys approved during the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1904: 

M. c. L. 

Base, standard or guide meridians 83 44 56 

Township lines 295 77 14 

Meander lines 13 7 98 

Subdivisional and connecting lines 1, 270 76 51 

Total 1, 663 46 19 

Total acreage of lands, 461, 934. 33. 

Returns of surveys under 22 contracts or special instructions were filed during the 
fiscal year. 

Returns of surveys under 11 contracts or special instructions have been worked up 
during the fiscal year. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL L^ND OFFICE. 341 

Returns of surveys under 9 contracts or special instructions have been partially 
worked up during the fiscal year. 

The following plats and tracings have been prepared during the fiscal year just 
ended: 50 township plats in triplicate, 25 township exterior diagrams in duplicate, 
8 plats of private-land grants, 3 tracings for the department, 35 tracings for deputies, 
etc., 10 tracings or plats for special agents, and 32 plats for the field examiner, aggre- 
gating 288 plats or tracings. 

Transcript of field notes prepared, pages 1,476. 

Descriptive sheets of 43 townships have been prepared. 

Three reports of surveys of private-land grants have been prepared. 

MINERAL DIVISION. 

Number of deputy mineral surveyors commissioned during the year 11 

Mineral surveys ordered during the fiscal year just ended 134 

The locations embraced in above orders were as follows: 451 lode claims, 5 placer 
claims, 4 mill-site claims, making a total of 460 claims. 

Survey orders that were amended during the year, 42, embracing 154 loads, 1 pla- 
cer, and 5 mill sites. 

Mineral surveys approved during the year just ending, 151. 

The locations embraced in the approved surveys w T ere as follows: 557 lodes, 18 
placers, 35 mill sites, making a total of 610 claims. 

In connection with the surveys that have been approved during the year there 
were prepared 622 plats showing 2,228 locations. It was also necessary to transcribe 
approximately 3,000 pages of field notes, affidavits, location notices, certificates of 
approval, etc. 

When I assumed the duties of this office I found that the mineral department was 
about six months in arrears in its work, a condition which had obtained for some 
years past, and which caused a great amount of dissatisfaction among the applicants 
for mineral surveys. I have therefore made a special effort to bring this work as 
near up to date as practicable, so that now I can report that such surveys are 
approved within thirty to forty days after the returns are filed in this office. 

In addition to the above there have never been any district mining sheets prepared 
for this office, and this work, as well as the segregation sheets showing the lot areas 
in township surveys resulting from mineral surveys, is being brought up to date as 
fast as possible. 

There have been prepared so far 83 district mining sheets, embracing 2,054 surveyed 
claims. This work is of a difficult and uncertain nature, owing to the fact that most 
of the mining districts are situate in the mountainous districts on unsurveyed land, 
and I have not been able to secure authority to have the various mineral monuments 
connected w T ith each other. I respectfully recommend that a special appropriation 
be asked for for this purpose. 

Statement of accounts with the appropriations for the service of the office of United States 
surveyor-general for Arizona. 

A. — SALARIES SURVEYOR-GENERAL AND CLERKS. 

Appropriations $7, 800. 00 

Paid salary surveyor-general $2, 000. 00 

Paid clerks 5, 536. 72 

Balance refunded to United States June 30, 1904 263. 28 

7,800.00 

B. — CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

Appropriation $1, 000. 00 

Paid rent $381. 67 

Paid incidentals 585. 32 

Retained by General Land Office for freight 15. 52 

Balance refunded to United States June 30, 1904 17. 49 

1,000.00 

Statement of accounts of moneys deposited by individuals for the survey of public lands. 

C — OFFICE WORK AND STATIONERY — PUBLIC LANDS. 

Amount deposited during the year $145. 00 

Amount expended during the year $24. 00 

Balance to credit of office June 30, 1904 121. 00 

145. 00 



342 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



D. — OFFICE WORK AND STATIONERY — RAILROAD SURVEYS. 

July 1, 1903, balance to credit of office $1, 196. 91 

Amount deposited during the year 1, 540. 00 



Amount paid clerks and for stationery $1, 690. 25 

Amount refunded to railroad companies 598. 70 

Balance to credit of office June 30, 1904 447. 96 



2, 736. 91 



2, 736. 91 



E. — OFFICE WORK AND STATIONERY — MINING CLAIMS. 



Balance to credit of office July 1, 1903 $35, 573. 99 

Deposits during the year: 

First quarter $3, 415. 00 

Second quarter 5, 260. 00 

Third quarter 2, 355. 00 

Fourth quarter 3, 820. 00 

Total 14,850.00 



Disbursements during the year: 

First quarter $1, 673. 50 

Second quarter 3, 973. 47 

Third quarter 3, 094. 55 

Fourth quarter 3,239.06 



50, 423. 99 



Total 11,980.58 



Balance to credit of office June 30, 1904 

Correspondence of office. 



38, 443. 41 





Received. 


Dispatched. 


Department letters 


470 
2,312 


649 


Miscellaneous letters 


2,898 






Total 


2,782 


3,547 





Very respectfully , i Frank S. Ingalls, 

United States Surveyor-General of Arizona. 
The Commissioner of the General Land Office, 

Washington, D. C. 



KEPOKT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 343 



REPORT OF THE SURVEYOR-GENERAL OF CALIFORNIA. 



Office of U. S. Surveyor-General for the District of California, 

San Francisco, July 1, 1904- 
Sir: In compliance with instructions contained in circular letter E, dated April 21, 
1904, I have the honor to transmit herewith my annual report, in duplicate, of the 
surveying operations in this district for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904. 

During the year there have been received and properly recorded and indexed the 
following, viz: 

Miscellaneous letters 2, 494 

An increase over last year of 155. 

Department letters 352 

Applications for — 

Survey of mining claims 158 

Survey of agricultural lands 25 

Number of settlers applying 41 

Appointments as United States deputy mineral surveyors 28 

There have been issued as follows: 

Miscellaneous letters 2, 888 

An increase over last year of 140. 

Department letters 499 

An increase over last year of 111. 

Instructions for mining surveys 156 

Amended orders for mining surveys 22 

Orders for amended surveys 2 

Orders for reports on mining claims 13 

Contracts awarded 10 

Aggregate liability of contracts and special instructions $9, 577. 30 

Of this amount $76.50 is payable from special deposits and $9,500.80 from the 
appropriation for public lands. 

Special deposits have been made as follows: 

Mineral surveys $10, 260. 00 

Township surveys (including O. W. and S. and field examination) 681. 50 

Total > 10, 841. 50 

Appended hereto is a list of United States deputy mineral surveyors who have 
qualified, showing dates of appointment and bond; also a list of all contracts and 
special instructions awarded. 

List of appointments and reappointments, United States deputy mineral surveyors. 



Name. 


Date of 
appointment. 


Bond. 


Wirt R. Macmurdo 


July 6,1903 
July 22,1903 
Aug. 13,1903 
Aug. 20,1903 
Aug. 25,1903 
Sept. 1,1903 
Sept. 17, 1903 
July 23,1903 
Sept. 28, 1903 
Sept. 29,1903 
Sept. 28, 1903 


July 6, 1903 


William S. Coulter 


Aug. 3, 1903 


John J . Goldsworth y 


Aug. 18,1903 


Arthur Hauraan 


Aug. 20,1903 


Edward K. Dupont 


Aug. 25,1903 


John A. Brown 


Sept. 14,1903 


Warren V. Clark 


Sept. 17, 1903 
Sept. 28, 1903 
Sept. 30, 1903 


Henrv J . Jory 


Alfred B. Summers 


Alfred Baltzell 


Oct. 3, 1903 


Warren E. Murray 


Oct. 19,1903 



344 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



List of appointments and reappointments, United States deputy mineral surveyors — Cont'd. 



Name. 



Date of 
appointment. 



Bond. 



Henry Lahiff 

Frank E. Herrick 

Henry C. Schmidt 

Charles W. Garside 

Harvey J. Sarter 

Joseph D. Cox 

Thomas L. Darby 

Harold C. Cloudman... 

Edward Dexter 

Orville H. Packer 

Frederick S. Schmidt . . 

WillH. Earl 

Mason W. Bnfnngton . . 

Paul E. Lepoids 

George J. C. Donaldson 
Porter P. Wheaton 



Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Dec. 
Mar. 
Oct. 
Feb. 
Apr. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Apr. 



13, 1903 
23, 1903 

9. 1903 

12. 1903 

23. 1904 
18, 1904 
12, 1904 

1. 1904 

28. 1903 

21. 1904 

10. 1903 
8, 1904 

22. 1904 
21,1904 
16,1904 

1,1904 



Oct. 17, 
Nov. 23, 
Dec. 16, 
Dec. 18, 
Feb. 17, 
Feb. 18, 
Feb. 25, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 1, 
Mar. 21, 
Feb. 29, 
Do. 
Apr. 22, 
Apr. 4, 
Mav 4, 
Apr. 13, 



1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 

1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 



CONTRACTS AWARDED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1904. 

Contract No. 221, dated August 5, 1903: Completion of public surveys in T. 13 N., 
R. 8 W., Mount Diablo meridian, as well as necessary resurveys and retracements 
connected therewith. Liability, $436.50, payable from appropriation for surveys and 
resurveys of public lands for fiscal year ending June 30, 1904. David F. Mclntire, 
deputy surveyor. 

Contract No. 222, dated August 14, 1903: Section 35, T. 3 N., R. 12 W., San Ber- 
nardino meridian (necessary resurveys and retracements). Liability, $387, payable 
from appropriation for fiscal year ending June 30, 1904. W. A. Sickler, deputy 
surveyor. 

Contract No. 223, dated August 29, 1903: T. 5 S., R. 20 E., Mount Diablo meridian 
(completion of surveys in township) . Liability, $367.45, payable from appropriation 
year ending June 30, 1904. J. M. Doyle, deputy surveyor. This contract was not 
signed nor the bond executed; Mr. Doyle was released and survey readvertised. 

Contract No. 224, dated October 26, 1903: T. 17 S., R. 2 E.,'T. 19 S., R. 1 E., 
Mount Diablo meridian (completion of public surveys in township). Liability, 
$624.85, payable from appropriation year ending June 30, 1904. Lou G. Hare, 
deputy surveyor. 

Contract No. 225, dated November 7, 1903: T. 8 N., R. 30 W., San Bernardino 
meridian (completion of public surveys in township). Liability, $1,629, payable 
from appropriation year ending June 30, 1904. Austin F. Parsons, deputy surveyor. 

Contract No. 226, dated November 21, 1903: Buena Vista rancho, resurveys and 
retracements of lines and corners necessary to locate the boundaries of the same as 
surveyed by J. C. Hays, deputy surveyor, and to give connections of those bounda- 
ries with public lands and lines of the rancho as patented. Liability, $440, appropria- 
tion for year ending June 30, 1904. W. A. Sickler, deputv surveyor. 

Contract No. 227, dated March 22, 1904: T. 5 S., R. 20 E., Mount Diablo meridian 
(completion of public surveys in township). Liability, $366, payable from appropria- 
tion for surveys and resurveys, etc. W. A. Sickler, deputv survevor. 

Contract No. 228, dated April 22, 1904: T. 13 N., R. 9 E., Mount Diablo meridian, 
sections 31, 32, 33, and 34, resurveys and retracements necessary to complete new 
work (the new work being provided for. under special instructions in lieu of a con- 
tract). Liability, $367, payable from appropriation. William Burton, deputy sur- 
veyor. 

Contract No. 229, dated June 7, 1904: T. 2 N., R. 13 W., San Bernardino meridian, 
completion of public surveys in township and necessary resurveys and retracements 
in connection therewith. Liability, $b00, payable from appropriation. Clinton 
Gurnee, deputy surveyor. 

Contract No. 230, dated June 4, 1904. T. 4 N., R. 10 W., San Bernardino meridian, 
sections 11 and 12, completion of public surveys in sections and necessary resurveys 
and retracements connected therewith. Liability, $200, payable from appropriation. 
William W. Allen, deputy surveyor. 

The following contracts were awarded during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1903, 
but owing to delay in filing the bonds the liabilities were made payable from the 
appropriation for surveys and resurveys for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904: 

Contract No. 218, dated May 23, 1903: T. 1 N., Rs. 2, 3, and 4 E.; T. 2 N., R. 3 
E., San Bernardino meridian, necessary resurveys and retracements to complete sur- 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 345 

veys in township. Liability, $696, payable from appropriation for surveys and resur- 
veys. Legrand Friel, deputy surveyor. 

Contract No. 219, dated Mav 26, 1903: T. 13 S., Rs. 13, 14, and 15 E.;T. 14 S., Rs. 
13, 14, and 15 E. ; T. 15 S., Rs. 13, 14, and 15 E.; T. 16 S., Rs. 13, 14, 15, 17 S., 15 
and 16 E., San Bernardino meridian, resurvey of exterior lines of townships. Lia- 
bility, $1,709, payable from appropriation for surveys and resurveys of public lands. 
Amzi A. Henderson, deputy surveyor. 

Contract No. 220, dated June 3, 1903: T. 5 S., R. 4 E., Humboldt meridian, com- 
pletion of public surveys in township, as well as resurveys and retracements neces- 
sary to complete said surveys. Liability, $780, payable from appropriation for sur- 
veys and resurveys. Frank A. McKee, deputy surveyor. 

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS IN LIEU OF CONTRACTS. 

To David F. Mclntire, deputy surveyor, dated October 23, 1903: Survey of claim of 
William C. Randolph in Tps. 12 and 13 N., R. 10 W., Mount Diablo meridian, and 
necessary resurveys and retracements. Liability, $132, payable from appropriation 
for surveys and resurveys of public lands, year ending June 30, 1904. 

To Charles A. Robinson, deputy surveyor, dated August 19, 1903: Providing for 
survey of east boundary of Tps. 7 and 8 S., R. 5 E., San Bernardino meridian. Lia- 
bility, $276, payable from special deposits by Southern Pacific Railroad Company 
(already included in original estimate for deposits of last fiscal year). 

To George W. Pearson, deputy surveyor, dated August 19, 1903: Providing for 
delimitation of west boundary of Tps. 7 and 8 S., R. 6 E., San Bernardino meridian, 
from contract No. 196, of October 2, 1902. 

To Legrand Friel, deputy surveyor, dated March 16, 1904: Special supplemental 
instructions for subdivisions in T. 1 N., R. 4 E., additional to instructions under con- 
tract Nos. 217 and 218. 

To W. A. Sickler, deputy surveyor, dated March 19, 1904: Providing for survey of 
claim of Alexis Lemouton in sections 24 and 25, T. 4 N., R. 8 W., San Bernardino 
meridian. Liability, $280. payable from appropriation for surveys and resurveys of 
public lands. 

To Charles W. Garside, deputy surveyor, dated March 31, 1904: Appointing him 
compassman to complete surveys and resurveys provided for in J. F. Abbott's con- 
tract, Nos. 200 and 201, October 8, 1902. 

To Ernest A. Zoellin, deputy surveyor, dated April 14, 1904: Providing for surveys 
of sees. 30 and 31, T. 44 N., Ji. 6 W., Mount Diablo meridian. Liability $172, pay- 
able from appropriation for survej^s and resurvevs of public lands year ending June 
30, 1904. 

To William Burton, deputy surveyor, dated April 22, 1904: Providing for new work 
necessary to complete public surveys in sees. 31, 32, 33, and 34, T. 13 N., R. 9 E., 
Mount Diablo meridian. Liability $60, payable from special deposits by Central 
Pacific Railroad Company, per certificate No. 32, dated March 8, 1904. 

To Solomon H. Finley, deputy surveyor, dated June 7, 1904: Providing for survey 
of tract of land in sees. 1 and 2, T. 7 S., R. 10 W., San Bernardino meridian. Lia- 
bility $16.50, payable from special deposit by Joseph Ferguson, per certificate of 
deposit No. 4006, dated May 3, 1904. 

To Solomon H. Finley, deputy surveyor, dated June 7, 1904: Providing for neces- 
sary resurveys and retracements in connection with new work in T. 7 S., R. 10 W., 
San Bernardino meridian, provided for in special instructions of even date. Liability 
$18.50, payable from the appropriation for surveys and resurveys of public lands for 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1904. 

Number of contracts awarded during current fiscal year 10 

Number of special instructions issued in lieu of contracts 10 

The decrease in number of contracts is accounted for by the fact that eight of the 
applications for survey which were submitted to the Department during the present 
fiscal year have been suspended, waiting for an officer to be detailed by the Depart- 
ment to examine the bona fides of alleged settlers. These surveys, if embraced in 
awarded contracts, would amount, at special maximum rates, to $6,087.50, in addition 
to the liabilities as stated. 

Number of applications for survey 25 

Number of applicants 41 

Surveys approved by surveyor-general 21 

The extent and character of surveys approved in the year ending June 30, 1904, 
are as follows: 



346 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 347 

Work of drafting office for the year ending June 30, 1904- 





Township maps. 


Mineral lands, quartz and 
placer claims. 


Sundries. 






Exteriors. 


Subdivisions. 


/3 


Month and year. 


"3 

c 
'5b 

■B 

o 


03 
J 

« 

<ft< 

P 


o 


a 

03 
P 


OQ 

'5b 

o 


"3 

a 

[So 

o 


03 

a 

OS 

• 03 

P 


as 

"So 

03 


02 
S- 
03 

02 

O 


.2 

■al 

C 03 

•2 So 
o 

03 
CO 


be 

'3 

H 


a, 

o3 

a 

S 


O 03 

03 

ail 

c ^ 
££ 


03 

O 
03 

"3 

o 

£ 


O c 

a °s 

u >■ 

a 

o 

H 


1903. 
July 








1 

2 
2 
3 

4 
2 

3 
3 

13 
5 
3 
2 


4 
2 
4 
1 
....... 

3 
4 

1 
4 
6 
8 


17 
13 
17 
14 
4 
15 

4 
6 

10 

11 

10 

8 


17 
14 
17 
14 
4 
15 

4 
7 
10 
11 
10 
9 


17 
12 
17 
14 
4 
15 

4 

7 
9 
11 
9 

8 


57 
51 
37 
14 
4 
15 

4 

6 

9 

11 

8 
8 


3 
20 
34 
45 
39 
45 

48 
13 
57 

4 
14 

2 


1 




3 
19 

6 

8 
17 

4 

2 


4 
4 
5 
4 
4 
5 

"4" 

7 
10 
10 


124 




4 
1 


1 


4 
3 


146 


September 






143 






117 




i 


4 

2 

1 
1 
3 
2 
...... 


2 

3 

13 
9 
4 
2 
1 






87 








121 


1904. 


i 

4 
3 
1 
1 

1 






77 








68 








5 
25 

3 
11 


136 








99 








76 




1 


1 


62 






Total 


17 


16 


41 


43 


40 


129 


132 


127 


224 


324 


2 


1 


103 


57 


1,256 



SPANISH ARCHIVES. 

The year just completed has been a very busy one, and much valuable work has 
been accomplished. 

Notwithstanding the time taken up by visitors and others consulting these archives, 
the task of indexing the bound volumes of manuscripts has gone on steadily. 

From volume 117 to 138, inclusive, 22 volumes, an average of 2 volumes a month, 
containing a total of 18,041 pages, have been condensed into 622 closely- written 
pages of English index ; and this laborious task is fully appreciated by those consult- 
ing these records whose knowledge of Spanish is not. sufficient to enable them to 
understand the original manuscripts with their quaint and obsolete spelling, and, 
often, almost obliterated writing. 

The most notable among the contents of these volumes are: The visits of Russian, 
French, and English scientific expeditions; of George Vancouver, Puget, and other 
navigators; the Russian and English Commercial Company; Lord Cochrane and 
the insurgents of North and South America; the cultivation of hemp; forest fires; 
the census; meterological observations; the war of independence; trouble caused by 
English and American whalers and smugglers; laws against foreign shipping; with- 
drawal of the artillery corps and its replacement by militia; treatment of the Indians, 
mission escort; military reports, etc. 

The number of visitors reached 158, and may be divided into three classes, as 
follows: 

First. Lawyers, to examine original land grants, the principal of which were land 
claims No. 193, E. Molino; No. 541, Baulinas; No. 404, Alamito; No. 156, Jacinto; No. 
609, Canada de los Pinos; No. 4, San Antonio Rancho; No. 405, La Balsa Chica; No. 
609, E. Carmelo; No. 104, Saucelito; No. 528, Jesus Maria Rancho, etc. 

Second. Authors in search of material for historical compilations, notably the 
Franciscan clergy, who are compiling a history of their order in upper California. 

Third. Magazine and newspaper writers in search of themes for articles, of which 
the following have appeared in print: 

The Vigilance Committee at Los Angeles in 1838; Frauds on the Old Spanish and 
Mexican Land Grants; The First Divorce Case, Casilda Sepulveda v. Antonia Teodoro 
Trujillo; An International Romance, Rezanoff and Concepcion Arguello; The First 
Elopement, Josefa Carrillo with Capt. Henry D. Fitch; An Adept Smuggler; Abel 
Stearns, etc. 

The above show not only the utility of the archives to the public, but also the tax 
on the time of their keeper. 

Very respectfully, W. S. Graham, 

United States Surveyor- General of California. 

The Commissioner of the General Land Office, 

Washington, D. C. 



348 KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



REPORT OF THE SURVEYOR-GENERAL OF COLORADO. 



Office of the United States Surveyor-General, 

Denver, Colo., July 1, 1904. 
Sir: In accordance with instructions in your circular letter "E" dated April 21, 
1904, I have the honor to submit in duplicate the following annual report of the 
surveying operations in this district for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904: 

LAND DIVISION. 

Acres of agricultural land surveyed and accepted by General Land Office. Ill, 915 

Miles of lines surveyed and accepted by General Land Office 459 

Plats made of exterior and subdivisional surveys 61 

Irregular supplemental diagrams made at request of General Land Office. 20 

Irregular supplemental diagrams made at request of local land offices 20 

Tracings of official plats furnished special agents General Land Office ... 15 

Diagrams made to accompany special instructions to deputies 42 

Diagrams made for use of examiners of surveys 20 

Original segregation diagrams of surveyed sections, showing mineral sur- 
veys and fractional lottings made during the year in conformity with 
paragraph 37 on page 30, General Land Office Mining Laws Circular, 

approved July 26, 1901 78 

Amended 86 

Segregation diagrams of such sections made on small scale and transmit- 
ted to General Land Office 164 

Segregation diagram tracings of such sections made and transmitted to 

local land offices 164 

Total number of sections of surveved lands affected bv mineral surveys 

in this district ' * 1, 652 

Original segregation diagrams of such sections made to date 1, 134 

Contracts entered into for survey of public lands, payable from annual 

appropriation 14 

Special instructions prepared ,in quadruplicate and issued to contracting 

deputies 14 

Special deposits by Union Pacific Land Company during current fiscal 
year for survev of public lands, heretofore executed, as follows: For 
field work, $29*,983.60; for office work, $4,995.72 $34, 979. 32 

A new general index of all surveys in the land division, containing 456 pages, has 
been made during the year. 

STATEMENT OF SURVEYS UNDER CONTRACTS NOT CLOSED AT DATE OF LAST ANNUAL 

REPORT. 

Benj. F. Clark, deputy surveyor, contract No. 814, dated February 14, 1901, for 
balance of survey of 1 township. 

E. R. Warren, deputy surveyor, contract No. 815, dated March 19, 1901, for sur- 
vey of part of 2 townships. 

Benj. F. Clark, deputy surveyor, special instructions dated September 25, 1900, 
for extension survey in 1 township. 

Leonard Cutshaw, deputy surveyor, contract No. 818, dated January 8, 1902, for 
survey of 12 townships. 

B. F. Bailey, deputy surveyor, contract No. 821, dated June 11, 1902, for survey 
of 1 township. 

W. H. Wiggles worth, deputy surveyor, contract No. 822, dated August 1, 1902, 
for resurvey of part of one township and metes and bounds survey of agricultural 
claims. 

B. F. Clark, deputy surveyor, contract No. 823, dated December 8, 1902, for sur- 
vey of 1 township. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 349 

Wm. H. Lea, deputy suryeyor, contract No. 825, dated May 28, 1903, for survey 
of 1 township. 

A. E. Sprague, deputy surveyor, special instructions dated August 2, 1902, for 
extension survey in 1 township. 

Frank V. Alkire, deputy surveyor, contract No. 824, dated February 28, 1903, 
for survey of portions of 2 townships, under special deposit system. 

Statement of contracts entered into with deputy surveyors for the survey of public lands in 
Colorado, during the fiscal year ending June SO, 1904, payable from the annual appro- 
priation for that year. 



No. 


Date of 
contract. 


Name of deputy. 


Character of work. 


Estimated 
liability. 


(") 


Sept. 28, 1903 
Oct. 28, 1903 
May 18, 1904 
Mav 19, 1904 
June 22, 1904 
June 23, 1904 

do 

June 27, 1904 
June 23, 1904 

do 

June 25, 1904 

do 

do 

do 




Fractional T. 2 N.,R. 79i W .. 


( b ) 
$220. 00 


8'?6 




T. 7 S., R. 83 W 


827 




T. 32N.,R. 2 W .. 


434 00 


(«) 

8*>8 


F. I. Huntington 

Wm.H. Clark 


Sec. 1, T. 2 S., R. 79 W 


36.00 
5, 600. 00 
5 000.00 


8?9 


Benj. F. Clark 

James M. Clark 

Wm. S. Taylor 

C. C. Schrontz 

Alonzo H. Adams 

Albion K. Vickery 

Wm. C. O'Brien .. 

Chas. S. Booth 

Le Roy E. Young 




830 


do 


5, 000. 00 
5, 000. 00 


831 


do 


83'> 


do 


5, 000. 00 
5, 000. 00 
5, 000. 00 


833 


do 


834 


do 


835 


do 


5, 000. 00 
5, 000. 00 
4, 400. 00 


836 


do 


837 


do 







a Special instructions. b Examiner of surveys. 

Surveys accepted by General Land Office during fiscal year ending June 30, 1904. 



No. 


Date. 


Deputy. 


Township 
and range. 


Meridian. 


Distance. 


Area. 


Account 
allowed. 


814 
818 

(«) 
(a) 
(a) 


Feb. 14, 1901 
Jan. 8, 1902 

Sept. 25, 1900 
Aug. 2, 1902 
Sept. 28, 1903 


B. F. Clark 

L. Cutshaw 

B. F. Clark 

A. E. Sprague 

E. L. Faison, jr.. 


47N.,13W. 
49to51N., 
17 to 20 W. 
1N.,104W. 

4N..73W. 
2N.,79£W. 


New Mexico.. 
do 

Sixth 

do 

do 


M. C. L. 

60 62 38 
361 36 62 

11 93 45 
11 00 10 
13 63 68 


Acres. 
23, 277. 38 
82, 112. 48 

2, 408. 96 

3, 199. 84 

916. 19 


$424. 54 
2, 762. 08 

70.00 
75.00 





a Special instructions. 

Statement of contracts under which deputy surveyors have been granted an extension of time 
in which to complete surveys and make returns. 



No. 


Date. 


Deputy. 


Character of survey. 


Estimated 
liability. 


822 
8?4 


Aug. 1, 1902 
Feb. 28, 1903 


W. H. Wigglesworth . . 
F. V. Alkire 


Exteriors and subdivisions and metes and 

bounds of agricultural claims. 
Exteriors and subdivisions under "Special 

deposit." 


$425. 00 
340. 00 









Surveys completed and approved, by the surveyor-general, not yet accepted by the General 

Land Office. 



No. 


Date. 


Deputy. 


Character of survey. 


Accounts 
submitted. 


815 


Mar. 18, 1901 
June 11, 1902 
Dec. 8, 1902 
May 28, 1903 


E. R. Warren 




$600. 00 


8?1 


B. F. Bailey 


do ... 


420. 05 


8'?3 


B. F.Clark 


do ... 


531.13 


825 


Wm. H. Lea 


do 


249. 34 











350 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Contract No. 822, dated August 1, 1902, Wm. H. Wigglesworth, deputy surveyor, 
resurvey of portion of T. 35 N., R. 11 W., and metes and bounds survey of agricul- 
tural claims, has been completed in the field, and the plats and transcripts are now 
being prepared in this office. 

MINERAL DIVISION. 

Statement of official orders issued during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904. 



Nature of work. 


Number. 


Lodes. 


Placers. 


Mill 

sites. 


Orders from original surveys, 1903: 

July 


62 
80 
65 
65 
62 
47 

46 
34 
41 
24 
29 
38 


137 
161 
153 
129 
152 
113 

135 
57 
71 
56 
64 
83 


8 
2 
7 
9 
4 
1 

4 
3 
6 
2 
4 
5 


3 








4 


October 


1 


November 


3 


December 


7 


Orders for original surveys, 1901: 


3 


February 




March 


3 


April 








June 








Total 


593 
35 


1,311 


55 


31 














Total 


628 


1,311 


55 


31 






RECAPITULATION. 


628 
4 
4 


































636 
















July 


24 
39 
47 
102 
67 
70 

52 
59 
55 

48 
20 

27 


36 
123 
102 
263 
157 
145 

112 
155 
149 

99 
124 

98 


1 
3 

10 
5 
9 
4 

5 

7 
2 
6 
3 

2 






2 


September 


2 




7 




8 




2 


Original surveys approved, 1904: 


5 


February 


9 


March 


1 


April 


4 




1 


June 








Total 


610 
83 


1,563 
175 


57 
3 


41 










Total 


693 


1,738 


60 


41 






Reports on placers and certificates of expenditure approved . . . 

RECAPITULATION. 


60 

610 
83 
60 






































Total 


753 

















Original surveys before the Office June 30, 1904- 





Number. 


Locations. 




44 

18 


121 




38 






Total 


62 
75 


159 


Orders issued and surveys not filed 


146 







RERORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 351 

Amended surveys before the Office June 30, 1904. 

Awaiting action of claimants 31 

Cases in Office under examination 6 

Connected sheets and mineral jrtats. 

Old connected sheets 1, 691 

New connected sheets constructed 19 

Old connected sheets reproduced 17 

Mineral plats made 2, 968 

Field notes, reports, and affidavits prepared 825 

Letters. 

General Land Office letters received 520 

Miscellaneous letters received 4, 200 

General Land Office letters written 730 

Miscellaneous letters written 2, 500 

Deputy mineral surveyors. 
Number in good standing 137 

STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 

Salaries surveyor-general and clerks. 

Received from appropriation $13, 500. 00 

Paid surveyor-general 2, 000. 00 

Paid clerks 11, 499. 76 

Balance refunded, as per certificate of deposit dated June 30, 1904, issued 

by the First National Bank of Denver, Colo .24 

13, 500. 00 
Contingent expenses. 

Received from appropriation $3, 550. 00 

Received from Leadville land office for 100 sheets drawing paper 13. 00 

Paid for office rent 1, 200. 00 

Paid to messenger 720. 00 

Paid for incidentals 1, 595. 14 

Balance refunded, as per certificate of deposit, No. 5173, dated June 30, 

1904, issued by the First National Bank of Denver, Colo 47. 86 

3, 563. 00 
Deposits by individuals for office work on survey of mineral claims. 

Balance in United States Treasury July 1, 1903 $19, 569. 67 

Deposits during fiscal year: 

July, 1903 $4, 250. 00 

August, 1903 5, 975. 00 

September, 1903 3, 710. 00 

October, 1903 3, 620. 00 

November, 1903 4, 740. 00 

December, 1903 J 2,860.00 

January, 1904 3, 995. 00 

February, 1904 1, 950. 00 

March, 1904 2, 135. 00 

April, 1904 1, 660. 00 

May, 1904 1, 860. 00 

June, 1904 2, 805. 00 

39,560.00 

Total 59,129.67 



352 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

Drafts from United States Treasury. 

July 20, 1903 $15,000.00 

October 29, 1903 10,000.00 

February 2, 1904 12, 000. 00 

April 19, 1904 11,000.00 

$48, 000. 00 

July 1, 1904, balance in United States Treasury 11, 129. 67 

Special deposits office account. 
July 1, 1903: 

Balance in First National Bank, Denver, Colo $1, 958. 92 

Drafts from United States Treasurer, as above 48, 000. 00 

$49, 958. 92 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid clerks and incidentals quarter ending — 

September 30, 1903 12, 195. 50 

December 31, 1903 12,874.24 

March 31, 1904 11,826.58 

June 30, 1904 10, 309. 64 

47,205.96 

July 1, 1904: 

Balance in First National Bank, Denver, Colo 2, 752. 96 

Balance in United States Treasury 11, 129. 67 

Balance in First National Bank, Denver, Colo 2, 752. 96 



Total balance to credit of Office 13,882.63 

Respectfully submitted. 

John F. Vivian, United States Surveyor- General of Colorado. 
The Commissioner of the General Land Office, 

Washington, D. C. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 353 



REPORT OF THE SURVEYOR-GENERAL OF FLORIDA. 



Office of United States Surveyor-General, 

Tallahassee, Fla., July 1, 1904. 
Sir: In compliance with instructions contained in your circular letter E of April 
21, 1904, I have the honor to transmit herewith, in duplicate, my report of survey- 
ing operations in the district of Florida for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904. 

applications for surveys. 

Applications for surveys have been made as follows: 

February 8, 1904, application by Mr. Nicholas Armeda, for survey of an island in 
Estero Bay, in sec. 11, T. 47 S., R. 24 E.; approved by the Department May 28, 
1904; special instructions submitted for examination June 3, 1904; approved June 9, 
1904; sent to Deputy Joseph F. Shands June 14, 1904. 

February 8, 1904, application by Mr. Jerome Walker, for survey of an island in 
the Caloosahatchie River, in sec. 33, T. 43 S. , R. 25 E. Owing to lack of care on the 
part of the applicant in responding to call for necessary information, the papers in 
this case are not yet complete. 

February 16, 1904, application of Mr. William W. Kitchell for the survey of an island 
in the Caloosahatchie River, in sec. 33, T. 45 S., R. 23 E., was renewed (original 
application filed October 11, 1899). Approved by the Department May 28, 1904; 
special instructions submitted for examination June 3, 1904; approved June 9, 1904; 
sent to Deputy Robert B. Leak June 14, 1904. 

March 5, 1904, application by Messrs. Bushnell & Nelson for the survey of four 
islands in Lake Tsala Apopka, in sees. 14 and 15, T. 20 S., R. 20 E. Instructions as 
to procedure sent them March 7, 1904. Nothing further has been heard. 

March 5, 1904, application by Mr. W. N. Brown for the survey of an island in 
Charlotte Harbor, in sec. 34, T. 42 S., R. 21 E. Instructions as to procedure sent 
March 7, 1904. Nothing further has been heard. 

March 24, 1904, application by Mr. G. R. Jones for the survey of ''Garden Key" 
in Pine Island Sound, in sees. 24 and 25, T. 44 S., R. 22 E. Instructions as to pro- 
cedure sent March 25, 1904. Nothing further has been heard. 

The application of J. C. Pettersen for the survey of an island in Pensacola Bay, 
filed June 19, 1903, was opposed by the Brent Lumber Company, occupying the 
island, and testimony filed by both parties at interest. The evidence submitted was 
so conflicting that the Department was unable to reach a decision, and applicant was 
informed that he must apply for a hearing if he desired to push the application fur- 
ther. This action was taken by him on June 14, 1904, and hearing ordered for 10 
o'clock a. m. June 30, 1904, before F. W. Marsh, clerk United States circuit court, 
Pensacola, Fla. Final hearing (examination of papers by the United States surveyor- 
general) at 10 o'clock a. m. July 5, 1904. 

plats prepared. 

Plats prepared for Copt. Francis R. Skunk, Engineer Corps, U. S. Army. — T. 18 S., R. 
28, E.; T. 19 S.,R. 28 E.; T. 18 S., R. 30 E.; T. 26 S., R. 31 E.; T. 25 S., R. 32 E.; 
T. 26 S., R. 32 E.; T. 20 S., R. 33 E.; T. 18 S., R. 34 E.; T. 20 S., R. 34 E.; T. 21 S., 
R. 34 E.; T. 23 S., R. 34 E.; T. 19 S., R. 35 E.; T. 29 S., R. 35 E.; T. 27S.,R. 36 E.; 
T. 31 S., R. 38 E.; T. 33 S., R. 39 E. 

Plat prepared for Special Agent Fred. Hoisington. — T. 17 S., R. 16 E. 

Plat prepared for register United States land office at Gainesville, Fla. — Sec. 4, T. IN., 
R. 7 W. 

Fifteen plats prepared in connection with returns of surveys by Deputy J. T. 
Hancock, jr., under his contract No. 11, about the northern end of Lake Okeechobee. 

Plats prepared in connection with special instructions. — T. 47 S., R. 24 E., in triplicate; 
part of T. 45 S., R. 23 E., in triplicate; diagram illustrating proposed subdivision of 
T. 40 S., R. 26 E., in triplicate. 

8970—04 23 



354 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 

FIELD NOTES SUPPLIED GOVEENMENT AGENTS. 

July 9, 1903, transcript of field notes of survey of sections 3 and 4, T. 8 S., R. 30 E., 
sent Special Agent Antoine Paul. 

December 5, 1903, transcript of field notes of survey of south boundary of T. 14 S., 
R. 13 E. , sent Special Agent Antoine Paul. 

February 24, 1904, transcript of field notes of survey of 120 miles of Government 
lines sent to Special Agent E. D. Stanford. 

CONTRACTS. 

Under date of August 1, 1903, Contract No. 12 was entered into with Joel A. Barber 
for the subdivision of T. 40 S., R. 26 E. Estimated liability, $500. 

No other contract has been entered into during the year, but special instructions 
have issued as follows, the formality of a contract being deemed unnecessary: 

June 3, 1904, instructions to Joseph F. Shands for survey of island in Estero Bav, 
in sec. 11, T. 47 S., R. 24 E. Estimated liability, $25. 

June 3, 1904, instructions to Robert B. Leak for survey of island in mouth of 
Caloosahatchie River, in sec. 33, T. 45 S., R. 23 E. Estimated liability, $35. 

RETURNS OF SURVEYS. 

Under date of September 29, 1903, the returns of survey about the northern end 
of Lake Okeechobee, executed by Deputy J. T. Hancock, jr.,- under his contract No. 
11, were transmitted to Washington for approval. 

SWAMP-LAND SELECTIONS. 

Lists of swamp-land selections by the State of Florida have been sent up recom- 
mended for approval as follows: 



July 6, 1903 

Jul v 29, 1903 

Jul v 30. 1903 

January 21, 1904. 
March 19. 1904. . . 
May 2, 1904 



List No. 


Acres. 


106 


39.44 


107 


1, 300. 05 


108 


117.00 


109 


39. 89 


110 


767.92 


111 


1, 606. 43 



RECOMMENDED FOR REJECTION. 

L T nder date of August 24, 1903, the State of Florida filed a swamp-land list aggre- 
gating 9,584.76 acres, which was recommended for rejection; an appeal was taken 
and the tracts examined by a special agent of the Department, in whose report it 
was shown that 1,606.43 acres of the 9,584.76 acres claimed could be classed as swamp. 
Approved list No. Ill embraces these tracts. 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

Departmental letters received 82 

Miscellaneous letters received 370 

452 

Departmental letters written 144 

Miscellaneous letters written 497 

641 

APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 

Appropriations for salaries $3, 000 

Expenditures on account of salaries 3, 000 

Contingent appropriation 500 

Expenditures on contingent account $480. 02 

Balance covered into Treasury 19. 98 

500 

Respectfully submitted. 

Edmund C. Weeks, 
United States Surveyor- General of Florida. 
The Commissioner of the General Land Office. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 355 



REPORT OF THE SURVEYOR-GENERAL OF IDAHO. 



Office of United States Surveyor-General, 

Boise City, June 30, 1904. 

Sir: In compliance with your circular letter E, dated April 21, 1904, I have the 
honor to submit, in duplicate, the annual report of surveying operations in the district 
of Idaho for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904, with tabular statements as follows: 

Exhibit A 1. — Statement of contracts and special instructions (in lieu of contract) 
awarded during fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 

Exhibit A 2. — Statement of special instructions (in lieu of contract) awarded, pay- 
able from special deposits by individuals, for fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 

Exhibit A 3. — Statement of contracts awarded, payable from continuing appro- 
priation account Northern Pacific Railway, for fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 

Exhibit B. — Statement showing status of public land surveys under contracts and 
special instructions (in lieu of contract) for fiscal year ending June 30, 1904. 

Exhibit C. — Detailed statement of performance of work in the field and mileage of 
approved surveys executed. 

Exhibit D. — Statement of accounts. 

Idaho is settling up more rapidly than any other State. Especially is this true of 
the six large interior counties. Large areas of the State are in no way connected 
with the public survey, and even though sustaining substantial settlements, appli- 
cations for survey can not receive consideration when not in the progress of the 
work. Parallels and auxiliary meridians should be properly extended over all these 
areas in order that subdivisional surveys could be made to better meet the needs of 
settlement. It would also be of great benefit to the miner as well. Mineral monu- 
ments could be connected with these surveys, thereby giving a definite location to 
each mining district and claim, and the necessity for many voluminous segregation 
plats would thus be obviated. 

In view of the lack of bids offered for fractional townships included in late lists 
calling for proposals to execute public surveys, it would seem that it is neither good 
practice from a professional point of view nor economical in the long run to the Gov- 
ernment to ask for the survey of a part of a township, except to complete the survey 
of same. Whenever the completion of the survey of any township has been ordered 
the cost of retracement, resurveys, and reestablishment of defective corners has 
always exceeded the cost of completely sectionizing the township in the first instance. 
Moreover, such small tracts can only be contracted for at the highest rates allowable. 
There are many fractional townships in the State at the present time for which no 
responsible deputy will accept even the maximum rates for the work that is to be 
done, and it then devolves upon those desiring the survey to make up the difference, 
which is contrary to law, and is accepted with risk by the deputy executing the work. 
Very respectfully, 

Ernest G. Eagleson, 
United States Surveyor- General of Idaho. 

The Commissioner of the General Land Office, 

Washington, D. C. 



356 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



A 1. — Statement showing contracts awarded and special instructions (in lieu of contract) 
issued, payable from the apportionment of $32 ,000 from appropriation by act of Congress 
approved March 3, 1903, for surveys and resurveys of public lands for the fiscal year end- 
ing June 30, 1904. 



Contract. 



No. Date. 



246 



251 



252 



253 



254 



255 



256 



257 



1903. 
Nov. 10 



1904. 
June 9 



June 11 



do 



...-.do... 



June 15 



June 24 



June 27 



Name of deputy, 



George W. Fenley 



Ernest P. Rands and 
Harold A. Rands. 



Wm. J. Rafferty 



Oscar Sonnenkalb 
a n d W alter G . 
Turley. 



William Alley and 
David B. Wicker- 
sham. 



George W. Fenley 



Alfred L. Geddes. 



Albert Oliver. 



Description of surveys. 



All of the meander, section, and 
connection lines necessary to com- 
plete the survey of such parts of 
the following townships as are 
strictlv adapted to agriculture: 
T. 1 N., R. 5 W.; T. 1 S., R. 5 W.; 
T. 10 N., R. 3 W.; T. 3 S., R. IE.; 
T. 11 S., R. I E., and T. 2 N., R. 
4E. 

All of the meander, section, and 
connection lines necessary to com- 
plete the survey of such'parts of 
the following townships as are 
strictlv adapted to agriculture: 
T. 48N..R. 2 W.; T.49N., R.3W.; 
T. 42N.,R. 4W.; T. 52 N., R. 5 W.; 
T. 56 N., R. 1 W.; T. 65N., R. 2 W. 

All of the standard, meander, town- 
ship exterior, section, and con- 
nection lines necessary to com- 
plete the survey of such parts of 
the following townships as are 
strictlv adapted to agriculture; 
Group 1— T. 50 N., R. 3 W.: T. 51 
N., R.3 W.; Group 2— T. 11 S., R.4 
E; T. 13 S.. R.5E.; E.|T, 12S..R. 
4 E.; E. i T. 3 S., R. 20 E., and N. | 
T. I S., R. 20 E. 

All of the meander, township ex- 
terior, section, and connection 
lines necessary to complete the 
survey of such parts of the follow- 
ing townships as are strictly adapt- 
ed to agriculture: T. 30 N., R. 4 
E.; T. 32 N., R. 4 E.; T. 33 N., R. 
4 E.; T. 34 E., R. 4 E.; T. 34 N., R. 
3E. 

All of the standard, meander, town- 
ship exterior, section and connec- 
tion lines necessary to complete 
the survey of such parts of the fol- 
lowing townships as are strictly 
adapted to agriculture. Group 1— 
T. 2 N., R. 6 E.; T. 2 N., R. 10 E.; 
T. 3 N., R. 10 E. Group 2— T. 14 
N., R.4 E.; T. 20 N., R. 4 W.; T. 
21 N., R. 3 W. 

All of the section and connection 
lines necessarv to complete the 
survey of T. 7 S., R. 5 W.; T. 4 S., 
R. 6 W.; part of T. 9 N., R. 3 E., 
west of North Fork of Pavette 
River; T. 49 N., R. 2 E.; T. 50 N., 
R. 2E. 

All of the meander, township ex- 
terior, section, and connection 
lines necessary to complete the 
survey of the following town- 
ships: T. 24 N., R. 1 E.; T. 25 N., 
R. 1 E.; T. 24 N., R. 1 W.; T. 25 
N., R. 1 W.; T. 26 N., R. 1 W.; T. 
27 N., R. 1 W.; T. 28 N., Rl W. 

All of the standard, meridian, me- 
ander, township exterior, section, 
and connection lines necessary to 
complete the survey of the follow- 
ing townships: T. 22 N., R. 1 W.; 
T. 23 N., R. 1 W. ; T, 29 N., R. 4 E. 



Liability. 



$3, 200 



3,260 



3,415 



2, 760 



7, 520 



,870 



5,650 



500 



Approved 
by Commis- 
sioner. 



Dec. 2, 1903 



June 29,1904 



June 28, 1904 



June 24, 1904 



June 25, 1904 



June 29,1904 



Do. 



Do. 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS. 



1903 




July 


8 


Aug. 


4 


Apr. 


16 



Oscar Sonnenkalb 

Harold A. Rands 

George W. Fenley 



T. 53 N., R. 6 W. 
Sees. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 
T. 1 S , R. 6 W . . 



T. 44N.,R. 1 E. 



$100 
105 
126 



July 28,1903 
Aug. 22, 1903 
Apr. 30,1903 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 357 



A 2. — Statement showing special instructions (in lieu of contract) issued for survey of 
public lands, payable from special deposits by individuals under the provisions of section 
2401, United States Revised Statutes, and acts amendatory thereof 



Date. 


Name of deputy. 


Description of surveys. 


Liability. 


Approved by 

General 
Land Office. 


1903. 
July 20 

Sept. 21 
Nov. 20 


George C. Campbell . . 

John M. Woodburn. . . 
Jos. A. Clark 


1 

Completion of survey of fractional T. 48 
N., R. 5 W. 
ISurvev of sees. 1, 12, and 13, T. 5 N., R. 
J 38 E. 


$92 
120 


Aug. 8,1903 

/Oct. 14,1903 
\Dec. 11,1903 




Total 


212 











A 3. — Statement showing contracts awarded, payable from continuing appropriation account 
Northern Pacific Railway, by act of Congress approved March 2, 1895, for surveys and 
resurveys of public lands for fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 



Contract. 


Name of deputy. 


Description of surveys. 


Liability. 


Approved 
by Commis- 
sioner. 


No. 


Date. 


247 
248 


1904. 
Apr. 16 

May 26 


Homer D. Angell and 
Clyde W. Riddell. 

Geo. Ray Campbell 
and W. A. Burt 
Campbell. 

Total 


All of the section and connection 
lines neccssarv to complete the 
survey of T. 44* N., R. 2 E. 

The east boundary line and all the 
sections and meander lines neces- 
sarv to complete the survey of T. 
4:; N., R. 3 E. 


$1,050 

876 


May 14,1904 
June 24, 1904 




1,926 













B. — Statement showing status of public land surveys under contracts and special instructions 
in lieu of contracts for fiscal year ending June SO, 1904. 



Contract. 


Name of deputy. 


Status of work in office. 


Trans- 
mitted to 
General 
Land 
Office. 


Remarks. 


No. 


Date. 


997 


1901. 
Dec. 26 

....do... 

1903. 
Jan. 28 

....do... 


Edson D. Briggs 






Notes filed May 13, 1904. 


998 


Approved Sept, 2, 1903.. 


1903. 
Sept. 2 




?,3R 


Herman D. Gradon & 

James H. Robb. 
Harold A. Rands 




936 


do 




Notes filed June 30, 1904. 


?37 


....do... 


Geo. C. Campbell 


do 




238 
?39 


Mar. 28 
....do... 


Oscar Sonnenkalb 

Edson D. Briggs 


Approved Feb. 20, 1904. . 


1904. 
Feb. 20 


Extension of time. 


?40 


....do... 


A. L. Rinearson 






Partial notes filed, exten- 


?41 


....do... 

....do... 
....do... 

June 18 
....do... 

Nov. 10 


A.N. Kimmel and F.D. 
Maxwell. 

R. C. Canrield 


do 




sion of time to Aug. 30, 
1904. 
Partial notes filed, exten- 


242 


do 




sion of time to Dec. 1, 
1904. 


243 


Emery Oliver and 
Henry V. Klippel. 

Geo. R. Campbell 

Jos. W . Waldron 

Geo. W. Fenley 


do 






244 
MR 


Approved Mar. 15, 1904. . 


Mar. 15 


Partial notes filed. Ex- 


v>46 


do 




tension of time to Nov. 
1, 1904. 
Notes tiled June 13, 1904. 











358 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



B. — Statement showing status of public land surveys under contracts and special instructions 
in lieu of contracts for fiscal year ending June 30, 1904 — Continued. 

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS. 



Date. 


Name of deputy. 


Status of work in office. 


Trans- 
mitted to 
General 
Land 
Office. 


Remarks. 


1903. 
July 8 


Oscar Sonnenkalb 


Approved Feb 20, 1904.. 
Approved Mar. 4, 1904. . . 


1904. 
Feb. 20 
Mar. 4 




1904. 
Apr. 16 

1903. 
July 20 

June 22 

Aug. 4 
Sept. 21 

Nov. 20 




Notes fifed June 17, 1904. 


Geo. C. Campbell 






Declines work bv letter, 


A. N. Kimmel and F. D. 
Maxwell. 






June 11, 1904. 
Notes not filed. 

Notes filed June 13, 1904. 








Additional resurveys neces- 
sary. 


Jos. A. Clark 

















C. — Detailed statement of performance of work in the field — Mileage of approved surveys 

executed. 



No. 


Name of deputy, 


Meridian 
lines. 


Standard 

lines. 


Township 
lines. 


Section 
lines. 


Meander 
lines. 


Connec- 
tions. 


997 




M. C. L. 


m. a l. 


m. c. l. 

35 4 69 

37 77 65 

30 8 73 
17 71 9 

65 66 67 
43 73 68 


m. a l. 

155 6 21 
213 55 4 

252 6 4 
179 73 11 

263 8 44 
15 66 28 


M. C. L. 

21 77 40 

7 23 67 


M. C. L. 
31 88 


998 




23 67 28 




72 11 


235 


Herman D.Gradon and 


16 2 38 
3 

'3i"*3""31 


1 4 80 


238 
243 


Oscar Sonnenkalb 

Emery Oliver and 

Henry V. Klippel 

George R. Campbell 

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS. 


2 2 99 

6 

48 44 


10 72 83 


1 77 20 
10 


?44 




37 42 




18 14 


28 1 










74 42 


4 48 9 


16 19 




Total 












79 70 71 


50 5 69 


231 56 93 


1,084 23 21 


40 32 4 


6 27 61 









ACCOUNTS. 

D. — Salaries of surveyor-general and clerks payable from appropriation for fiscal year 

ending June 30, 1904. 

Appropriation Ill, 000. 00 

Paid surveyor-general $2, 000. 00 

Paid clerks 8, 928. 72 

Balance refunded into Treasury 71. 28 

11,000.00 11,000.00 

Account of contingent expenses. 

Appropriation $1, 500. 00 

Paid rent, light, and fuel 1 $518. 00 

Paid messenger 400. 00 

Paid account of incidentals 544. 41 

Paid freight charges retained in Treasury 37. 04 

Balance refunded into Treasury .55 

1,500.00 1,500.00 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 859 

Special deposits for office work — Mineral surveys. 

Balance available July 1, 1903 $9, 271. 11 

Deposits 9,070.00 

Paid clerks $6,420.50 

Paid incidentals 564. 33 

Balance available July 1, 1904 11, 356. 28 

18,341.11 18,341.11 
E. — Summary of letters, documents, plats, field notes, and other papers. 

Letters to Commissioner of General Land Office 525 

Letters to local land offices 130 

Letters to deputy surveyors 874 

Letters to individuals 1, 675 

Official telegrams 6 

Transcripts, field notes, mineral surveys (2,452 pages) 69 

Transcripts, field notes, agricultural surveys ( 3,482 pages) 54 

Transcripts for deputies in field (392 pages) 27 

Transcripts, United States mineral monuments ( 12 pages) 3 

Mineral plats - 279 

Agricultural plats 238 

Location monument plats 6 

Segregation plats 89 

Plats for deputies 38 

Contract diagrams for General Land Office 16 

Diagrams for examiners 37 

Miscellaneous tracings 23 

Number mineral connection sheets made 29 

Number of descriptive lists made 84 

Accounts of deputies, in triplicate 9 

Orders issued mineral surveys (314 locations) 90 

Amended orders issued ( 6 locations ) 3 

Mineral surveys, approved (204 locations) 73 

Location notices copied 628 

Contracts awarded ( in quadruplicate) 10 

Special instructions in lieu of contract 3 

Special instructions in quadruplicate ( 228 pages ) 23 

Pages property list 36 

Deputy mineral surveyors, July 1, 1 903 83 

New deputy mineral surveyors commissioned during fiscal year 1904 7 

Commissions renewed 5 

Commissions expired during fiscal year 19 

Deputy mineral surveyors in good standing June 30, 1904 76 

Vouchers in duplicate 331 

Abstracts in triplicate 48 

Accounts current 46 



360 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF GENERAL LAND OFFICE. 



REPORT OF THE SURVEYOR-GENERAL OE LOUISIANA. 



Office of the United States Surveyor-General, 

New Orleans, La., July 1, 1904. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith, in duplicate, my annual report for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1904, prepared in accordance with instructions contained 
in your circular letter dated April 21, 1904, Division E, the same being accompanied 
with the following statements, viz: 

A. — Estimate of funds to be appropriated for the surveying service in the district 
of Louisiana for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1906. 

B. — Estimate of funds to be appropriated for the compensation of the surveyor- 
general and his clerks in the district of